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Articles Tagged Realignment 

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A look at why contraction is not a legitimate option for Major League Baseball.

For those that haven’t followed baseball’s history outside the diamond, White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf could well be defined as one of baseball’s hardliners. While neither he nor Bud Selig would admit it, the two were greatly responsible for driving former commissioner Fay Vincent, Selig’s predecessor, out of office.

Reinsdorf has been a hardliner on other issues as well. He’s a key sounding board on labor issues and has often chimed in on paring the league down via contraction. Whether this was in 2002 when the league owned the Montreal Expos or now, when the difficulty of new stadium construction comes along, Reinsdorf has hit on the “C” word.

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The first part of a roundtable discussion about how teams in the NL Central will fare in the 2012 season.

PECOTA Team Projections
​Record: 74-88
Team WARP: 20.2
Team TAv: .253
Runs Scored: 685
Runs Allowed: 756
Team FRAA: 1.1







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July 13, 2011 9:00 am

On the Beat: Straight from the Commissioner

3

John Perrotto

Bud Selig hands down answers from on high at the All-Star Game, while Derek Jeter's absence becomes a story.

PHOENIX—It is usually difficult to characterize Derek Jeter as a sympathetic figure.

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With realignment in the news again, revisit our staff's thoughts about an earlier proposal to redistribute the teams.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Realignment proposals have been floating around for some time, as evidenced by the following discussion, which originally ran as a "Prospectus Roundtable" on March 20, 2000.

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August 17, 2004 12:00 am

From the Desk of Vex Peters

0

Jim Baker

Note: As we've mentioned in the past, every so often, we lay our hands on a document that was probably not intended for public consumption. We are not at liberty to say how it is we come by these things because we do not wish to compromise our conduit thereto. Suffice it to say, we will continue to make these available to you as long as we can continue to "come by" them. Here is the latest of these intercepted internal missives.

To: Realignment Planning Committee
From: Vex Peters, Steering Chairman, MLB
Date: August 16, 2004
RE: Operation Save-the-Game

People, have you looked at the standings? Are you happy about this? A month ago, we had our army of shills in the broadcast booths claiming there were 23 teams in the hunt for a playoff berth. What's that number down to now, people? Thirteen? We've got four divisions completely out of hand. We've got two wild card races that are tight but how long can we count on that? Either one or both could go s***sville in two weeks' time.




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May 7, 2004 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Webgate

0

Joe Sheehan

I got more than a few e-mails yesterday about Webgate, MLB's plan to, as put by most people, desecrate the bases with a promotional graphic for the upcoming Spider-Man 2 movie. It's a moo point--"Friends" tribute--now, as MLB has backed away from the logoed bases in the face of overwhelming fan and media backlash. During the day that the plan was in place, I couldn't get worked up about it, in the same way that I couldn't get worked up about the ads that appeared on uniforms during the season-opening series in Japan. While I know that some people consider these things to be an affront, as well as an aesthetic nightmare, I consider neither to be the case. Certainly uniform and base ads are less intrusive in person than ballpark signage or between-innings advertising blasted at 110 decibels. For those watching at home, ads superimposed on the backstop on every pitch are clearly a greater incursion on the experience. If MLB could mine one more revenue source without detracting from the game--and six-by-six painted squares certainly pale in comparison to the profile of the other marketing messages being conveyed--then more power to them.

During the day that the plan was in place, I couldn't get worked up about it, in the same way that I couldn't get worked up about the ads that appeared on uniforms during the season-opening series in Japan. While I know that some people consider these things to be an affront, as well as an aesthetic nightmare, I consider neither to be the case. Certainly uniform and base ads are less intrusive in person than ballpark signage or between-innings advertising blasted at 110 decibels. For those watching at home, ads superimposed on the backstop on every pitch are clearly a greater incursion on the experience. If MLB could mine one more revenue source without detracting from the game--and six-by-six painted squares certainly pale in comparison to the profile of the other marketing messages being conveyed--then more power to them.

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Curt Schilling is never at a loss for words, and unlike a lot of athletes (and actors and other Famous People™) who like to sound off to the media, he often has something of substance to say. Last week was no different, when ESPN.com posted a 2,400-word essay by the Diamondbacks' hurler, focusing on the impending labor war and the economic structure of the game. As you might expect, Schilling raised some valid points and some not-so-valid ones, and probably gave the players their first bit of good PR for the upcoming skirmish.

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The BP crew discusses the implications of a rumored plan to redistribute baseball's teams.

About two weeks ago, the story broke that Major League Baseball was contemplating another round of realignment for the 2001 season. While the plan floated is subject to change, the primary adjustments would lead to a four-division, no-wild-card National League, and a three-division, wild-card American League. The two most recent expansion teams would switch leagues, and teams would be aligned in a time-zone-friendly manner.

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