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04-28

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TDGX Transactions: Week 5
by
J.J. Jansons

04-14

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5

Banjo Hitter: Jon Singleton, Suited Connector
by
Aaron Gleeman

04-06

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30

The Stash List: 2017 First Edition
by
Greg Wellemeyer

04-05

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11

Dynasty Dynamics: Six (Slightly) Delayed Gratification Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

04-05

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4

TDGX Transactions: Amateur Draft
by
J.J. Jansons

03-24

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4

Banjo Hitter: Sticking at Shortstop
by
Aaron Gleeman

03-23

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0

Looking Back on Tomorrow: Atlanta Braves
by
Mike Gianella

03-22

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8

Five to Watch: American League Post-Hype Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

03-21

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6

Five to Watch: National League Prospects
by
Greg Wellemeyer

03-21

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Rubbing Mud: Lift Yourself Up By Your Launch Angle
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-20

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24

Five to Watch: American League Prospects
by
George Bissell

03-15

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26

Dynasty Dynamics: The Next 112
by
Ben Carsley

03-10

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1

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 9-10
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-09

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5

Get to Know: Relief Pitcher Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

03-09

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2

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 7-8
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-09

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2

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Relief Pitchers on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

03-08

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2

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 5-6
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-08

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1

Guarding The Lines: A Prospect Guy's Guide To The WBC
by
Jarrett Seidler

03-07

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4

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 3-4
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-06

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6

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: 2017 Rounds 1-2
by
BP Fantasy Staff

03-02

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4

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Starting Pitchers on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

02-28

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12

Get to Know: Starting Pitcher Prospects for 2018 and Beyond
by
Ben Carsley

02-27

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14

Get to Know: Starting Pitcher Prospects for 2017
by
Ben Carsley

02-17

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8

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Outfielders on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

02-15

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7

Get to Know: Outfield Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

02-13

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8

2017 Prospects: The Top 101 Prospects, Sliced and Diced
by
Rob McQuown

02-13

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2017 Prospects: PECOTA Takes on The 101
by
Wilson Karaman

02-13

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69

2017 Prospects: The Top 101 Prospects of 2017
by
Jeffrey Paternostro and BP Prospect Staff

02-10

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2

Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: Javier Baez vs. Dansby Swanson
by
Greg Wellemeyer

02-09

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2

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Shortstops on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

02-09

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2

Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: Franklin Barreto vs. Gleyber Torres
by
Mark Barry

02-08

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4

Get to Know: Shortstop Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

02-02

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Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Third Basemen on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

02-01

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5

Get to Know: Third Base Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

01-27

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Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: Ian Happ vs. Raul Mondesi
by
Greg Wellemeyer

01-26

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1

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Second Baseman on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

01-25

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9

Get to Know: Second Base Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

01-20

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2

Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: A.J. Reed vs. Dan Vogelbach
by
George Bissell

01-19

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5

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: First Basemen on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

01-19

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5

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: The Top 50 First Basemen
by
Bret Sayre

01-18

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10

Get to Know: First Base Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

01-13

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1

Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: Francisco Mejia vs. Chance Sisco
by
Greg Wellemeyer

01-12

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3

Dynasty League Positional Rankings Continued: Catchers on the Ocean Floor
by
Wilson Karaman

01-11

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1

Get to Know: Catcher Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

10-12

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2

Minor League Update: AFL Games of October 11th
by
Mauricio Rubio

09-29

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0

Fantasy Freestyle: Five Short-Season Hitters to Watch
by
Wilson Karaman

09-19

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0

Minor League Update: Games of September 16-18
by
Christopher Crawford

09-16

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Minor League Update: Games of Thursday, September 15th
by
Mark Anderson

09-15

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Minor League Update: Games of Wednesday, September 14th
by
Christopher Crawford

09-14

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Minor League Update: Games of Tuesday, September 13th
by
Wilson Karaman

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April 28, 2017 6:00 am

TDGX Transactions: Week 5

0

J.J. Jansons

Injuries can pinch available slots for minor-league prospects, presenting owners with a dilemma.

The Dynasty Guru Experts League is a 20-team (40-man roster) 5x5 rotisserie dynasty league founded by BP managing editor Bret Sayre in 2014. It is intended to satisfy the deep-league needs of all, down to just the right amount of Alexi Amarista. We roster 23 starters (C/1B/2B/3B/SS/MI/CI, along with two additional utility hitters, five outfielders and nine pitchers). We also roster seven bench slots and have 10 spots designated for minor leaguers, although a quick scan of the league finds that most teams utilize a majority of their bench spots for additional prospects. That means that there are an additional 100-120 prospects that are rostered above the 200 spots reserved for them.

These write-ups are intended to pair nicely with Mike Gianella’s Expert FAAB Review, as we will look at each week’s TDGX free-agent acquisitions, as well as include thoughts on every major trade that occurs during the season. The yearly budget for free-agent transactions is $100, with $0 bids allowed for major leaguers and prospects.

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Maybe teams should be being even more aggressive signing prospects to long-term contracts.

Jon Singleton signed a long-term contract with the Astros before he’d even played a major-league game, inking a five-year, $10 million deal one day ahead of his June 3, 2014 debut. At the time Singleton was a 22-year-old consensus top prospect, cracking both the Baseball Prospectus and Baseball America top-100 lists in four consecutive seasons. Other prominent prospects—including Astros organization-mate George Springer—had turned down similar pre-debut offers, and some critics believed that Singleton was signing away his future too cheaply.

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April 6, 2017 6:00 am

The Stash List: 2017 First Edition

30

Greg Wellemeyer

Fantasy prospects who were hiding in plain sight all along!

Half-a-week’s worth of major-league games are behind us. What better time to speculate wildly about the arrival of the game’s top prospects, to parse medical reports (and teams’ misdirection regarding those reports), and to hypothesize irresponsibly about who is on the brink of a closing gig. It’s the return of the Stash List!

In case you’re not familiar from years past, here are the four types of players eligible for inclusion:

  • Minor leaguers: anyone currently in the minors.
  • Major leaguers on the DL: anyone currently on the disabled list who is owned in fewer than 25 percent of ESPN leagues. The restriction is there to exclude obvious players like Steven Matz.
  • Closers-in-waiting: any reliever who is not actively getting saves and is owned in fewer than 25 percent of ESPN leagues. This excludes pitchers who are in committees, and setup men who are widely owned, such as Nate Jones for example.
  • Others-in-waiting: any other player who is not currently active in the role that would net him the most fantasy value. This includes pitchers who are in line for a rotation spot but are not currently there, and position players who are not receiving regular playing time. This excludes players like Javy Baez who would surely benefit from a full-time role, but who already receive enough playing time to be relevant in all leagues.

And with that out of the way, let’s get on with the list:

1. Julio Urias (LHP)—Los Angeles Dodgers

The prevailing line of thought a few weeks ago was that Urias would head to extended spring training when camp broke. Instead, the Dodgers optioned him to High-A. He isn’t expected to pitch there and will instead open his season at Triple-A Oklahoma City at a time to be determined. Urias missed a couple of weeks in mid-March with strep throat and hasn’t yet thrown three innings in an outing. Expect him to come down with strep throat another time or two in the coming weeks as he attempts to accomplish the dual goals of stretching out away from the majors and saving his arm for October 2021.

2. Yoan Moncada (2B)—Chicago White Sox

The top fantasy prospect in the game will start at Triple-A Charlotte, and Tyler Saladino isn’t going to stand in his way for long. I do have concerns about Moncada’s swing-and-miss denting his near-term value, especially given his lack of experience at the upper levels. His game-changing speed and power on contact balance that risk with a potentially substantial reward.

3. Jorge Soler (OF)—Kansas City Royals

Soler is eligible to come off the 10-day disabled list on April 9, but will require more time than that since he hasn’t swung a bat since Feb. 26. Given his injury history and the fact that oblique injuries can linger and/or recur, it’s fair to be concerned. Soler will be the Royals’ everyday right fielder as soon as he’s ready to come back. At just 25 years old, he still has a tremendous amount of untapped potential and the Royals are hoping regular playing time will draw it out.

4. Michael Conforto (OF)—New York Mets

Thanks to a .300/.323/.500 triple-slash this spring and a Juan Lagares injury, Conforto made the Mets’ Opening Day roster, even if nobody told the Citi Field PA guy. Unfortunately, there’s nowhere for him to play, which is a bit of a problem in a game where scoring is based on accumulation of statistics.

5. Collin McHugh (RHP)—Houston Astros

Tools are fun and all, but responsible stashing includes taking value wherever your league mates give it to you. McHugh’s ERA and WHIP have worsened in both of the two years since his out-of-nowhere 2014 breakout, which I suppose is driving his way-too-low 16 percent ownership rate. He’ll strike out a shade less than one batter per inning and should win double digits. That’s back-end value even if the ratios don’t correct, and I think they will. McHugh is slated to pitch Opening Day in Triple-A as he works his way back from dead arm this spring. That his arm perished is no surprise considering his extraordinary breaking ball usage.

6. Jose Berrios (RHP)—Minnesota Twins

Berrios was atrocious in the big leagues last season, yes. You don’t hear much about the 2.51 ERA, 0.99 WHIP, and 10.1 strikeouts per nine he tallied in 111.1 Triple-A innings, though. Maybe Berrios’ 2016 season is evidence that demonstrates the gulf between Triple-A and the majors, or maybe we just shouldn’t weight a 58.1 inning sample so heavily. If he can correct the rumored pitch tipping and throw a first pitch strike more often than 55.2 percent of the time – 29th lowest among 328 pitchers that threw at least 50 innings – I like his chances at a useful fantasy season. Berrios didn’t pitch much this spring because he represented Puerto Rico in the World Baseball Classic. It wouldn’t surprise me to see him in Minnesota as soon as he can get in the requisite reps in Rochester.

7. Reynaldo Lopez (RHP)—Chicago White Sox

8. Lucas Giolito (RHP)—Chicago White Sox

I still like Giolito more as a long-term option because of the upside. This ordering reflects my opinion that Reynaldo will be up first in 2017. At 23 years old, Lopez is hardly a finished product, but we have a better idea of what he can be since his stuff is in tact and his development is forward-moving. Giolito, on the other hand, enters a hugely important developmental year seeking to settle on some consistent mechanics and recover fastball velocity that went missing last season. The White Sox have no incentive whatsoever to rush Giolito through that process, or to make him attempt it against major-league hitters.

9. Martin Prado (3B)—Miami Marlins

Prado was the 18th-most valuable third baseman in 2016 according to ESPN’s player rater. If he hits in the top third of a top-heavy Marlins offense again, the counting stats should be there to complement his usually excellent batting average. Prado currently is on the 10-day disabled list but has been cleared to resume baseball activities.

10. Wilson Ramos (C)—Tampa Bay Rays

11. Tom Murphy (C)—Colorado Rockies

12. Devin Mesoraco (C)—Cincinnati Reds

Unless you own one of a small handful of options, you should be buying lottery tickets at the catcher position. Can I interest you in one that’s disabled? Ramos hit the 60-day version and won’t return until June at the earliest. It’s been three weeks since Murphy fractured his forearm on Anthony Rizzo’s bat. The recovery period was quoted as 4-6 weeks at the time, so it shouldn’t be too long before he’s back on the field. How often is an open question, given the Rockies’ apparent affinity for Tony Wolters. Mesoraco will begin 2017 in Double-A and Reds manager Bryan Price suggested he’d have to catch back-to-back nine-inning games before being activated. I acknowledge that these are all dubious investments for both injury and performance-related reasons, but catcher is such a wasteland that all three are worth an aggressive placement on this list.

13. Austin Meadows (OF)—Pittsburgh Pirates

Have you heard that the Pirates tried to trade Andrew McCutchen this offseason and might attempt to do so again depending on how he and the team play? If and when that happens, Meadows will be an immediate five-category contributor. He impressed this spring, hitting .333/.423/.556 in an extended look while all three of the Pirates’ starting outfielders played in the WBC.

14. Jose De Leon (RHP)—Tampa Bay Rays

De Leon will open on the minor-league disabled list with “forearm muscle discomfort,” whatever that is. Non-medically speaking, it is an issue for a pitcher who hasn’t yet thrown 120 innings in any of his three full professional seasons. The Rays, as usual, have incredible starting depth in the major leagues and upper levels of the minors. De Leon is at risk of moving down or off this list if he doesn’t return to action quickly, and in full form.

15. Blake Swihart (C)—Boston Red Sox

It wouldn’t be real Stash List without a Blake Swihart appearance.

16. Bradley Zimmer (OF)—Cleveland Indians

Man alive I’m ready for the minor league season to begin so I can begin quoting you small-sample minor-league stats instead of small-sample spring-training stats. Alas, it hasn’t, so allow me to tell you that Zimmer raked to the tune of a .358/.424/.660 line with three bombs and four steals this spring. More importantly, he only struck out 13 times in 58 plate appearances, a potential sign of progress after he struck out 171 times in 130 Double-A and Triple-A games a season ago. If Zimmer can carry the spring trend into the regular season, he’ll be up before long. Even with a healthy Michael Brantley, the Indians are giving outfield at-bats to the likes of Abraham Almonte and Austin Jackson.

17. A.J. Reed (1B)—Houston Astros

18. Joey Gallo (3B)—Texas Rangers

19. Pedro Alvarez (1B)—Baltimore Orioles

20. Dan Vogelbach (1B)—Seattle Mariners

Reed is the Berrios of hitters, a highly regarded prospect whose disastrous major league stint in 2016 overshadowed a dominant Triple-A performance. I like him the best of this group of mashers by a comfortable margin, but there’s nowhere for him to play in Houston presently. A five-year, $50-million contract says that Gurriel gets a long leash, though I’m not a believer in the 33-year-old Cuban as a first-division regular. Gallo is up with the big club while Adrian Beltre’s calf heals. He gave us the full Gallo in the season’s first two games, walking once, striking out four times, and hitting a baseball approximately 794 feet. That Pedro Alvarez had to take a minor-league deal on a team with, like, seven Pedro Alvarezes already on the roster seemed like a market overcorrection to me. The path to playing time is impossibly cloudy. His ability to destroy righties is not. I like players with strange dimensions as much as the next guy, and I like prospects who are proximate to the bigs. That’s about all I’ll say about Vogelbach, lest I anger the entire rest of the fantasy staff.

21. Archie Bradley (RHP)—Arizona Diamondbacks

Hooooo boy, I know we’re not supposed to overreact to one appearance, but did you see Bradley in relief on Tuesday night? That beard is glorious. Oh, and the stuff was too. Seven of the 10 outs Bradley recorded were by way of strikeout, and he had his heater up to 99. The bullpen is probably the right place for him, but don’t count him out as a starter just yet.

22. J.P. Crawford (SS)—Philadelphia Phillies

I’m not convinced that Crawford has an impactful fantasy profile. I am convinced that Freddy Galvis isn’t going to keep us from finding out before the summer heat settles in.

23. JaCoby Jones (OF)—Detroit Tigers

24. Aaron Altherr (OF)—Philadelphia Phillies

I like both of Jones and Altherr as power-speed options with potential for expanded roles in the near future. Jones’ path is clearer, as all he has to do is outperform Tyler Collins and Mikie Mahtook to earn the bulk of the center field reps going forward. Altherr, whose work with Matt Stairs led to a big spring, has a tougher road. He’ll have to displace one of Howie Kendrick or Michael Saunders, well-paid veterans brought in this winter. Ultimately, it makes far more sense for a rebuilding Philly club to see what they have in the younger, controllable Altherr. It just might take some patience while they arrive at that conclusion.

25. Roman Quinn (OF)—Philadelphia Phillies

If it’s difficult to find time for a guy already on the major-league roster, it’s even harder to figure how Quinn gets enough at-bats to matter. He has impact speed if a spot opens up. Until then, he’ll be in Triple-A trying not to get hurt.

Honorable Mention: Jorge Alfaro, Tyler Beede, Cody Bellinger, Carter Capps, Matt Duffy, Delino DeShields, Dilson Herrera, Ketel Marte, Francis Martes, Jesse Winker

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April 5, 2017 6:00 am

Dynasty Dynamics: Six (Slightly) Delayed Gratification Prospects

11

Ben Carsley

Fantasy help might be on the way soon in the form of top prospects who didn't quite make the big leagues out of spring training.

So it’s the first week of the season, and that promising rookie you snagged thinking he’d win a job in spring training is back in the minors. It happens to all of us. Veterans beat out rookies for jobs. Teams want to manipulate service clocks. Prospects look terrible in meaningless spring games. Injuries pop up. The reasons go on and on.

The good news? Not every prospect who fails to make his big-league club on Opening Day will be subject to a half-season or more of MiLB action. Here are six recently demoted top-101 guys I’m fairly confident you’ll be able to use in advance of the Super Two deadline in mid-June or, at the very least, near that benchmark. They’re sort of in order of how likely I think it is they reach the Majors soonish. Sort of. Enjoy.

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April 5, 2017 6:00 am

TDGX Transactions: Amateur Draft

4

J.J. Jansons

Twenty fantasy baseball experts from around the internet compete in a deep rotisserie-style dynasty league. Get tips from the best by taking a look at this periodic analysis of their transactions.

Welcome to the first edition of this year’s TDGX Transactions. I’ll be taking the torch from the world’s foremost expert on leaping relievers, George Bissell, who did an admirable job of recapping transactions. He also had the first pick in this year’s draft, which you’ll find plenty of thoughts on below.

For those not already acquainted with The Dynasty Guru Experts League, it is a 20-team (40-man roster), 5x5 rotisserie dynasty league founded by Baseball Prospectus managing editor Bret Sayre back in 2014. It is intended to satisfy the deep-league needs of all, right down to just the right amount of Alexi Amarista. We roster 23 starters: C/1B/2B/3B/SS/MI/CI, along with two additional utility hitters, five outfielders and nine pitchers. We also roster seven bench slots and have 10 spots designated for minor leaguers, although a quick scan of the league finds that most teams utilize a majority of their bench spots for additional prospects. That means there are an additional 100-120 prospects that are rostered above the 200 spots reserved for them.

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How many top-ranked shortstop prospects actually go on to play shortstop in the majors?

Last weekend the Twins announced that their top prospect Nick Gordon, the fifth overall pick in the 2014 draft, would cease playing exclusively shortstop and begin spending some time at second base as well. Positional versatility is not a bad thing, but Gordon’s draft stock was based on the belief that he was a shortstop, period, so the fact that there’s uncertainty about his ability to stick there before he even got to Double-A is discouraging. As a rail-thin 21-year-old with a poor walk rate and just five home runs in 293 games as a pro, Gordon will likely need to have significant defensive value to be a big-league asset.

Gordon’s older brother, Dee Gordon, was also a top prospect as a shortstop who later moved to second base. Dee, who cracked BP’s top 101 prospects list in 2010 and 2011, remained a shortstop long enough to log 147 major-league starts there in 2011-2013, but then shifted to second base full time in 2014 and hasn’t played shortstop since. When talk of little brother Nick possibly moving off shortstop got louder a couple weeks ago, Dee spoke up, telling Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press: “I’m not their front office, but my brother is a shortstop and it’s going to be tough for him to play second.”

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The cavalry is coming.

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March 22, 2017 6:00 am

Five to Watch: American League Post-Hype Prospects

8

Ben Carsley

The prospect shine might have worn off these players, but they're still worthy of your attention in fantasy formats.

I don’t know if you’ve ever heard this before, but prospects will break your heart. Most of them don’t pan out. Many of them fall off the face of the earth all together. And nearly all of them, even the ones who do turn out the way you dreamed, don’t do so right away.

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March 21, 2017 6:00 am

Five to Watch: National League Prospects

6

Greg Wellemeyer

Identifying a handful of senior-circuit prospects who are worthy of your attention.

Bret Sayre and Ben Carsley gave you their top 100 dynasty prospects a couple weeks ago and Carsley dropped 112 more names on you last week. As is my wont, I’m wading into still deeper waters to cover five guys that missed those lists. Applicability depends on league size, of course, but there should be a little something for everyone here, including re-drafters.

Eliezer Alvarez, 2B, St. Louis Cardinals

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Reds prospect Zach Vincej explains how he changed his hitting approach through tinkering and ignoring cliches.

Late last May, Zach Vincej’s career was on life support. He’d turned 25 years old a few weeks earlier and was playing for the Reds’ Double-A affiliate in Pensacola—or, worse and more accurately, not playing for them.

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March 20, 2017 6:00 am

Five to Watch: American League Prospects

24

George Bissell

A look at a handful of minor-leaguers who are worthy of your attention.

We’re less than two weeks away from Opening Day and fantasy baseball draft season is in full swing. It’s time to get excited. The primary focus of this article is to highlight American League prospects that are on the cusp of making a significant fantasy impact in the major leagues this upcoming season.

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March 15, 2017 6:00 am

Dynasty Dynamics: The Next 112

26

Ben Carsley

Why stop at 101 prospects when you can rank 213?

101 is an arbitrary number. Every year, the Baseball Prospectus Fantasy Team puts out a top-101 prospects list, and then Bret Sayre and I follow suit with top-101 dynasty prospect lists of our own. It’s a slight deviation on the industry-standard “top-100” you see around the web, but the truth is it often makes little sense to stop (or to extend to) a nice round number.

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