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Articles Tagged Prospects Will Break Your Heart 

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02-07

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7

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: What Could Go Wrong in 2012: Cleveland Indians
by
Jason Parks

08-04

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32

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Left Field
by
Jason Parks

02-02

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26

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: What Could Go Wrong with the Royals' Top Five?
by
Jason Parks

08-29

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2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-31

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18

Transaction Analysis: The All-A Edition
by
Christina Kahrl

04-12

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0

Transaction of the Day: Roster Reviews of the Easts
by
Christina Kahrl

04-11

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0

BP Kings Update
by
Ben Murphy

08-18

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0

Transaction Analysis: August 15-17
by
Christina Kahrl

07-27

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0

Transaction Analysis: July 25-26, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

07-22

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0

Transaction Analysis: July 17-21, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

02-15

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0

Transaction Analysis: National League, December 15, 2005-February 11, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

12-14

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0

Transaction Analysis: December 7-13
by
Christina Kahrl

07-21

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Transaction Analysis: July 14-19, 2005
by
Christina Kahrl

08-24

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Transaction Analysis: August 17-23, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

05-26

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Prospectus Q&A: Charlie Zink
by
Chaim Bloom

03-31

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Prospectus Q&A: Fred Claire
by
Jonah Keri

03-30

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0

Transaction Analysis: March 25-28, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

01-16

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Transaction Analysis: The Wests
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-25

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Transaction Analysis: August 25-September 21
by
Christina Kahrl

06-07

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Transaction Analysis: May 27-June 5, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

02-25

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0

Prospectus Q&A
by
Jonah Keri

07-19

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Transaction Analysis: June 25-July 14, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

05-09

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0

Prospectus Feature: How Sure is a "Can't Miss" Pitching Prospect?
by
Paul Covert

05-09

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0

How Sure Is A "Sure Thing"?
by
Paul Covert

04-12

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0

Touring the Minors
by
Keith Scherer

01-09

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0

An Early End to Spring
by
Rany Jazayerli

01-09

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0

An Early End to Spring
by
Rany Jazayerli

04-12

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0

Projected 1999 American League Standings
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-31

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Projected 1998 American League Standings
by
Baseball Prospectus

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Things you didn't know about Francisco Lindor: he can fly, heal the sick, and turn rocks into seven-layer cake.

Prospect #1: SS Francisco Lindor
Background with Player: My eyes; industry sources.
Who: Selected eighth overall in the 2011 draft, Lindor had enough heat on his name after pre-draft workouts that some in the industry thought Seattle would pop the young Puerto Rican with the second-overall pick. I’ve seen a lot of quality up-the-middle talent since I started down this prospect evaluation road, and rarely will a 17-year-old (now 18) shortstop showcase the type of skills to make you feel confident in their future major-league success. After watching Lindor in the Fall Instructional League, I have very little doubt that he will develop into a very good major leaguer, one that can play a premium defensive position while providing above-average offensive production. At the plate, Lindor can track balls from release point to target like a ten-year veteran, showing advanced recognition skills and an approach that should put him in favorable hitting environments. His hands and hips work very well, showing fluidity when they fire, and bringing his bat head into the zone quickly and efficiently. He shows contact ability and he drives through the ball with excellent extension; it’s easy to project a plus hit tool and at least solid-average power at maturity. In the field, Lindor is as precocious and instinctual as positional prince Jurickson Profar, showing easy actions, a very strong arm, and a preternatural feel for his craft. I’m slobbering all over Lindor without apology. I put a note in his locker after class. I hope he checks the box marked “yes.”

What Could Go Wrong in 2012: Lindor was a young high school draftee, turning 18-years-old after the 2011 season had already ended, so that youth will ride sidesaddle in the developmental process, both as a positive and negative. The downside to youth is inexperience, and all the praise that Lindor receives for this tools and his polish can’t change the reality of his limited existence. It’s likely that Lindor moves to full-season ball at some point in 2012, and the jump will represent the biggest challenge so far in Lindor’s brief career. Development is about failure and adjustment, and given the level of competition Lindor is likely to face, I think he could initially struggle, at least until he makes the necessary adjustments. This is a player that needs to see sharp breaking balls, that needs to see above-average velocity, that needs to face sequences and situations that you just can’t simulate with the same intensity on a practice field. Failure can be a good thing for young players, even if the exposure to failure is short-lived, as it most likely will be in the case of Lindor. I think he has a chance to be a star, and to be honest, I think he makes the necessary adjustments very quickly and emerges as a top tier prospect in the game before the year is out.



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Though left field may be where players head when they can't play anywhere else on the diamond, there are still some solid prospects at the position.

By the time my phone stopped ringing, and the text messages stopped being texted, and the e-mail stopped finding my inbox, I was left with over 100 outfield prospects with a vote of scout approval listed in my notes. That’s a sprawling canvas to work with, and the opinions were so varied that I needed to alter my approach to this article. So far in this sprawling prospect series, I’ve made every effort to narrow the positional class, usually starting with the “Leader of the Pack (Present),” continuing to the “Leader of the Pack (Future),” followed by the high-ceiling talents, the middle-tier talents, the sleepers, and finally the head-scratcher of the group, leaving a tally of 10-15 players, all of whom have legitimacy in their class. But the talent pool in left field is abstract, as it’s a position that is usually occupied with the deficient spoils of other positions, (center field, second base, etc.), and that opens the queue to a wide range of talent. That puts the onus of positional projection on those I asked, and those opinions were too varied to follow the established construct. So for this specific section of the Positional Primacy series, we have to take another road home.

Here’s my idea: Instead of trying to fit the collection of talent into the established tiers [read: those cute little aforementioned tiers], let’s just make it simple and present the prospects in two categories: “High-Ceiling Division” and “Not-Quite-the-Ceiling-of-the-‘High-Ceiling-Division’-but-Still-Packs-a-Prospect-Punch Division.” Let’s offer up the material in scouting snapshots rather than full-length scouting essays, and let’s free ourselves from the burden of listing every middle-tier prospect at the position, which would keep me here for the rest of my life, writing reports on players like Angelo Songco or Jake Smolinski, and basically drinking myself to death to dull the pain in my fingers. I had to make some choices.

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As talented as the Royals system's top prospects are, nobody's perfect, are they?

Falling in love with prospects is like dating someone because of their physical beauty. At first, you are blinded by the fact that you are involved with someone who is attractive, because, let’s face it, ours is a superficial society, and waking up next to David Beckham or Megan Fox is more appealing than waking up next to Clint Howard or Roseanne Barr. It's a little like having a system headlined by Eric Hosmer and Mike Montgomery being obviously more appealing than a system headlined by Mark Rogers and Cody Scarpetta.

But as the relationship advances, you might get to witness the weaknesses of your new dream partner consume their strengths. In the end you could still be left with a good-looking uniform, but it's draped on a prospect who ultimately failed to live up to the ceiling their initial attractiveness suggested was possible. Once you see the light, you promise yourself that you will no longer fall for a face... except that then you once again start looking for pretty faces, and the cycle repeats itself. Eventually, the aesthetic beauty that tickles your fancy actualizes into the complete package, and the world rejoices at your good fortune.

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A comprehensive recap of a big day for FIELDf/x.

I have seen the future, and its name is FIELDf/x. OK, so we kind of knew that. But today, FIELDf/x started to seem a lot more real, and even more exciting than I’d imagined. You may have noticed that BP had a man on the scene at Sportvision’s PITCHf/x summit whose liveblog was actually live. So why am I doing this, when Colin already did? Well, for one thing, Colin arrived fashionably late, and I was all over those first 14 minutes that he missed. For another, his computer died before a lot of the fun started. And for still another (this is a third reason, now), I thought it might be fun to do a Simmons-style quasi-liveblog (written live, published later) that would free me from worries about frequent updates, and allow me to write at length. Most likely that length turned out to be a good deal longer than anyone has any interest in reading, but if you’re determined to catch up on the day’s intriguing events without sitting through eight hours of archived video, you’re welcome to peruse what lies below. If you’d like to follow along, here’s an agenda, and here’s where you should be able to find downloadable presentations in the near future.

Here we are in sunny California, home of the cutest girls in the world, if the Beach Boys are to be believed (I gather there’s also a more recent chart-topper that expresses a similar view). Okay, so by “we,” I mean the attendees at the 3rd (annual?) Sportvision PITCHf/x summit, held at the Westin San Francisco in—you guessed it—San Francisco. I, on the other hand, am watching from the other end of the continent, via a webcast that dubiously claims to be “hi-res,” despite being blurry enough to make deciphering text an adventure (I guess “hi-res” is relative, in the sense that there are even lower resolutions at which it could’ve been streamed). And sure, maybe the Beach Boys weren’t thinking of this particular gathering when they extolled the virtues of California’s beach bunnies. But never mind that—it’s a beautiful Saturday afternoon here in New York, and how better to spend it than to watch a video of some fellow nerds talk about baseball in a dark room some 3,000 miles away? Well, to describe the experience at the same time, of course. Let’s get this quasi-liveblog started.

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March 31, 2009 8:32 pm

Transaction Analysis: The All-A Edition

18

Christina Kahrl

The American League's moves plus Atlanta's dealings.

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Christina finally catches up and reviews the rosters in the two divisions that always seem to get the most attention.

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April 11, 2007 12:00 am

BP Kings Update

0

Ben Murphy

Everything you wanted to know about the BP Kings Charity Scoresheet Draft.

Peter Gammons' unfortunate incident focused the spotlight on cerebral aneurysms, but my connection is more personal. My mother had a cerebral aneurysm rupture way back in 1977 and was fortunate to survive.

Draft Strategy: Be strong at scarce positions offensively, avoided the dreaded Pitcher-AAA as always, and work on building a better bullpen to compensate for the lack of early starting pitchers. I sort of strayed from that strategy by taking John Lackey relatively early, and I might have a problem at second base if Jose Lopez doesn't pan out. I wanted to build a good core under the age of 30, and I did a fairly decent job of that. One of my harder decisions was my first one--Grady Sizemore vs. Joe Mauer. The consensus seems to be that I went the wrong with Sizemore--the consensus could be right, but I get the idea that three years from now Mauer won't be catching as often, to preserve his knees. Maybe that's too far forward to look, but at the same token, I see Sizemore as basically being risk-free.

I participated in the Mock Draft in the Scoresheet newsgroup, and because of that I expected the draft to be a little more prospect-heavy early-on. With the notable exception of Nate Silver, it wasn't, which suits me fine. I'm happy to have Brignac and Adam Miller among my top prospects.


King Kaufman & Rob Granickback to top
Charity: Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health
Draft Strategy: Our only real strategy was to get big bats with the first few picks, then turn to pitching. Other than that, we basically reacted to the draft. We had the third pick, and in a league with an obvious top three, that made things easy. The one who's left is your guy, and that was Joe Mauer, whom we were happy to have. When Vernon Wells fell, we felt, to us at No. 22, we had our theme for the early part of the draft: Young, studly up-the-middle guys.


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The Red Sox acquire two players from within their division, Guamanian John Hattig gets called up to the majors, and the Braves are messing around with the back end of their rotation.

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Today Christina sorts out Ben Broussard's exodus from Cleveland, the new Yankee catcher, and what Dayton Moore's second bit of dealmaking bodes for the future in Kansas City.

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July 22, 2006 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: July 17-21, 2006

0

Christina Kahrl

The Diamondbacks get younger and better, the Red Sox get bad rotation news, and the Blue Jays get rid of a headache.

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Today Christina wraps up the offseason transactions by focusing on the National League.

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December 14, 2005 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: December 7-13

0

Christina Kahrl

Christina catches up with all the moves from last week's Winter Meetings.

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