CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Vote in the Internet Baseball Awards for a chance at a free copy of Dollar Sign on the Muscle
Voting ends in 17 days

Articles Tagged Positional Scarcity 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives
No Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 6, 2008 12:00 am

Transaction of the Day: Infield Issues Out West

0

Christina Kahrl

The Rockies and Dodgers have their own issues, their own advantages, and their own solutions for the holes created by injuries in their infields.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

With the college season well underway, it's time to start evaluating the 2008 draft crop, which looks to be a little light on top-shelf talent.

Every year's draft coverage begins the same way. You start making the calls, and the nearly-universal reaction is, "Really, it's already time for this?" The answer is yes, as while the major league season has only kind-of-sort-of begun and minor league Opening Day is still nearly a week away, the 2008 draft is creeping up on us, with many of the top college players only offering up 8-10 more looks for teams getting ready to spend millions on this year's amateur talent pool.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 19, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten Pack, 3/19/07

0

Kevin Goldstein

The top prospect in this year's draft both impresses and disturbs scouts with a 137-pitch performance.

The Indians selected Aubrey with the 11th overall pick in the 2003 draft. He not only had one of the sweetest swings in the college class that year, but also the stats to back it up, batting .420/.505/.733 in his final year at Tulane. His ascension to the big leagues was expected to be quick, but a series of injuries got in the way. While his career batting line as a pro is an impressive .311/.391/.509, he's also played in a grand total of 42 games over the past two years, with a back problem that some believe could be chronic limiting him to a total of 65 plate appearances all of last year. He showed up healthy this spring, and went 4-for-16 in eight games before getting reassigned to minor league camp for an expected Opening Day assignment to Double-A Akron. One problem--in his last big league game, he strained a hamstring and hasn't played since. In less than a month, Aubrey turns 25, and after missing two years of development time, the clock is ticking on the depressing transition from 'what could be' to 'what could have been.'

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

February 10, 2007 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Seven Simple Rules...

0

Matthew Kleine

Fantasy February rolls along with general guidelines for the first wave of mock drafts.

1. You can't win your league championship in the first two rounds, but you can certainly lose it.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 6, 2006 12:00 am

Future Shock: 2006 Draft Notebook, Part Two

0

Kevin Goldstein

After looking at the college class yesterday, Kevin turns to those players eligible for the draft from the high school ranks.

Much like the college class, the 2006 high school class is rich with pitching, light on bats, and filled with players who entered the year highly-regarded, but have disappointed thus far. While it's still early in the high school season, many teams are still looking for that out-of-nowhere player who suddenly gains momentum and works his way into the early rounds. "There's always one of those guys," said one team executive. "But based on this crop, I'm not sure he exists." Just the small number of top-flight positional players from the high school ranks has been the biggest disappointment. "This high school class, when it comes to hitters, is the thinnest I've ever seen," added a scouting director. "It's worse than 2000, and that's saying something."

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

August 29, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Changing of the Guard

0

Erik Siegrist

It may be time to throw out those old guidelines about positional production.

Looking at the bigger picture though, if Cabrera does indeed become a full-time 3B in 2006 it will be part of a larger talent flow that has made the hot corner arguably the most productive position on the infield. Alex Rodriguez's switch, David Wright's emergence, and the development of Aramis Ramirez and Morgan Ensberg have all contributed to the ascension of third base to the top of the fantasy food chain.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards. The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings. Hitters: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (Avg/OBP/SLG/RARP/VORP) Pitchers: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (ERA, IP, SNWAR or ARP, VORP)

Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards.

The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 24, 2004 12:00 am

Prospectus Roundtable: Top 50 Prospects, Part IV

0

Baseball Prospectus

Let's compare J.J. Hardy and Bobby Crosby: Player Age EqBA/EqOBP/EqSLG Hardy 20 .240/.316/.380 Crosby 23 .273/.356/.490 Adjusted for park and league context, Crosby's numbers were much, much better. How to balance that against the age differential? I think the question becomes: How likely is it that Hardy will post a line of .273/.356/.490 or equivalent by the time that he's 23? It's possible, certainly, and it's also possible that he'll post a line even better than that. But I don't think that it's *probable*. That's a lot of improvement to make. PECOTA would put the possibility at somewhere around 25%, I'd think, and I think that's enough to render Crosby the stronger prospect.

Baseball Prospectus Top 40 Prospects Roundtables:
2003 Part II
2003 Part I
2001


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Before delving into those harrowing inhabitants of the Baseball Prospectus statistics page like VORP, RARP, EqA or any other acronym that sounds like a debutante sneezing or something uttered on Castle Wolfenstein circa 1986, it's worth asking: What's wrong with those comfy traditional offensive measures like RBI, batting average and runs scored? This Baseball Prospectus Basics column is going to address that question and, ideally, demonstrate why the traditional cabal of offensive baseball statistics tell only a piece of the story. Later, someone smarter (but shockingly less handsome) than I will take you on a tour of the more advanced and instructive metrics like the aforementioned VORP, RARP and EqA. For now, though, we'll keep our focus on why we need those things in the first place.

This Baseball Prospectus Basics column is going to address that question and, ideally, demonstrate why the traditional cabal of offensive baseball statistics tell only a piece of the story. Later, someone smarter (but shockingly less handsome) than I will take you on a tour of the more advanced and instructive metrics like the aforementioned VORP, RARP and EqA. For now, though, we'll keep our focus on why we need those things in the first place.

Read the full article...

No Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>