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Articles Tagged Player Age 

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02-15

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18

Fantasy Freestyle: Mike Trout and Regression Obsession
by
Mike Gianella

07-03

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8

BP Unfiltered: Check Your Facts, or Twitter Will Check Them for You
by
Ben Lindbergh

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

01-19

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

01-16

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All-Stars, Part II
by
Jay Jaffe

01-02

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Outfielders, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

10-31

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Weighty Matter
by
Jay Jaffe

10-14

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39

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part Two
by
Rany Jazayerli

10-13

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57

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part One
by
Rany Jazayerli

08-22

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3

Resident Fantasy Genius: Is Prospect Potential Realized?
by
Derek Carty

07-13

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48

The Lineup Card: Cult Favorites: 18 Non-Star Ballplayers Who Should be Better Remembered
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-19

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14

Overthinking It: The Over/Under-30 All-Stars
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-15

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Scott Boras Factor: Reality or Hype?
by
Vince Gennaro

01-04

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7

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: The Right Fielders
by
Jay Jaffe

10-14

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20

Spinning Yarn: The Glavine Line
by
Mike Fast

07-22

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6

Changing Speeds: Cold Fusion
by
Ken Funck

06-28

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12

Top 10 Week: General Manager Candidates
by
Will Carroll

05-17

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32

Ahead in the Count: The Cost of OPP
by
Matt Swartz

04-27

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83

Ahead in the Count: Ryan Howard and the New MORP
by
Matt Swartz

03-11

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18

Contractual Matters: AL East
by
Jeff Euston

02-15

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31

Baseball Therapy: That Peak Age Thing, Part 1
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-13

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77

Prospectus Hit and Run: 10 Men Out
by
Jay Jaffe

01-11

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125

How Do Baseball Players Age?
by
J.C. Bradbury

05-31

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43

Prospectus Idol Entry: Fantasy Focus: Trade Market
by
Jeff Euston

03-26

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22

Lies, Damned Lies: Stress Tests
by
Nate Silver

08-22

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: The Ultimate Fantasy Draft (Part 2)
by
Nate Silver

08-21

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: The Ultimate Fantasy Draft
by
Nate Silver

05-15

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0

Prospectus Today: McCann versus Martin
by
Joe Sheehan

04-22

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0

Stupid Lawyer Tricks
by
Derek Jacques

04-18

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Adding Birthdays
by
Nate Silver

04-13

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

04-05

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: Dodgers and Nationals
by
Rany Jazayerli

11-08

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Schrodinger's Bat: The Biggest Booms and Busts?
by
Dan Fox

09-20

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2

Lies, Damned Lies: The Best Player in Baseball, Part One
by
Nate Silver

08-29

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Future Shock: Positional Rankings--Center Field
by
Kevin Goldstein

08-22

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Future Shock: Positional Rankings - Corner Outfield
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-06

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The Big Picture: Graying Offenses
by
David Pinto

06-01

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Prospectus Today: The Once and Future Superstar Shortstops
by
Joe Sheehan

04-19

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0

The Foreigners
by
Mike Plugh

04-10

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0

Impact Talent in Japan
by
Mike Plugh

04-05

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: In the Arms of an Angel
by
Dan Fox

03-11

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Prospectus Q&A: Pete Palmer
by
David Laurila

02-15

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Age Before Beauty
by
Dan Fox

02-01

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes on Prospects, Introduction
by
Nate Silver

10-16

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0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

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Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

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February 15, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Mike Trout and Regression Obsession

18

Mike Gianella

No matter how hard you try to discredit Trout, he stacks up as an elite fantasy option in 2013.

Like many fantasy players, I spend little if any time during the season worrying about what a player will earn the following year. Even in keeper formats, I don’t invest a significant amount of time trying to figure out future earnings.

While I didn’t have an exact dollar value assigned to Mike Trout for 2013 back in October, I assumed that I’d have him ranked first or second in AL-only formats and first, second, or third in mixed formats. Besides Ryan Braun and Miguel Cabrera, there were few players who seemed capable of putting up big enough fantasy numbers to come close to Trout.

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A Detroit Tigers pitcher corrects a Detroit Tigers writer on Twitter, because this is the world we live in.

The Tigers are going through a bit of a bullpen crisis, and late Monday night, Detroit News​ columnist Lynn Henning took to Twitter to speculate that the team might have to make a 40-man move to bring in a fresh arm. According to Henning, the most likely guy to go looks like right-hander Thad Weber, who pitched four innings for the Tigers in April but has otherwise spent the last couple seasons allowing a whole lot of homers for Triple-A Toledo.

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February 22, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview

28

Derek Carty and Michael Jong

Roundtable discussion of the pressing questions facing the NL East teams as we approach the start of the season

1) After a disappointing sophomore campaign, what can we expect of Jason Heyward going forward?
MJ:
Jason Heyward had an injury-riddled sophomore season in Atlanta, but there is a lot to like about his chances at a rebound campaign in 2012. His offensive line was deflated by a .260 BABIP, but his peripherals were once again stellar. His 11.6 percent walk rate represented a regression from 2010 but cannot be considered poor, and his .162 ISO likewise dropped from the previous year but did not experience a precipitous fall.


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Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author Roger Abrams.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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January 16, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All-Stars, Part II

22

Jay Jaffe

Who makes the Hall of Fame cut when faced against the Keltner Test and JAWS?

On Friday, I unveiled the catcher and infielders on what I'm calling the Keltner All-Stars, the best eligible player at each position outside the Hall of Fame. The name comes from former Indians third baseman Ken Keltner, who inspired Bill James' Keltner Test, a set of 15 questions that can be used to frame a player’s Hall of Fame case. The basis of my choices isn't that test. Instead, I'm using JAWS.

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Bernie Williams burned it up with the Yankees during his career, but did the Puerto Rican do enough to blaze a trail to the Hall?

Before Derek Jeter, there was Bernie Williams. As the Yankees emerged from a barren stretch of 13 seasons without a trip to the playoffs from 1982-1994, and a particularly abysmal stretch of four straight losing seasons from 1989-1992, their young switch-hitting center fielder stood as a symbol for the franchise's resurgence. For too long, the Yankees had drafted poorly, traded away what homegrown talent they produced for veterans, and signed pricey free agents to fill the gaps as part of George Steinbrenner's eternal win-now directive. But with Steinbrenner banned by commissioner Fay Vincent and the Yankees' day-to-day baseball operations in the hands of Gene Michael, promising youngsters were allowed to develop unimpeded.

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October 31, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Weighty Matter

10

Jay Jaffe

As CC Sabathia's opt-out date ticks nearer, we look at some of his potential free-agent comparables from the past.

The stroke of midnight on Monday is the deadline for Yankees ace CC Sabathia to opt out of the final four years of the seven-year, $161 million deal he signed in December 2008, and the word on the street, via SI.com's Jon Heyman, is that he will do so. While a thrilling World Series played out in Texas and St. Louis, the New York City tabloids were been busy picturing Sabathia in a Red Sox uniform, particularly on the heels of the news that John Lackey will miss the 2012 season due to Tommy John surgery. The Yankees are said to have prepared a pre-emptive pitch; according to the New York Post's George King III, "The Yankees are believed to be OK with a five- or six-year deal for an obvious raise over his current $23 million a year. Yet seven or eight years is something they want to avoid because of age, workload, and Sabathia gaining weight across the second half of last season."

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In part two, Rany examines just how important age is for a draft pick.

Yesterday’s column made the claim that small differences in age among high school hitters can have a dramatic impact on their return as draft picks. Today, I intend to prove that claim.

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One of BP's co-founders returns to reveal an important amateur draft inefficiency.

Everyone missed on Mike Trout. Don’t get me wrong: Trout was a well-regarded player headed into the 2009 draft, a certain first-round talent. But he wasn’t—yet—a phenom. Everyone liked Trout; it’s just that no one loved him. Baseball America ranked him as the 22nd-best player in the draft. No one doubted his athleticism or his work ethic; a lot of people doubted the level of competition he faced as a high school player from rural New Jersey. The Angels drafted him with the 25th pick overall, and they’ll tell you today that they knew he was destined to be a special player. What they won’t tell you is that they had back-to-back picks at #24 and #25, and they announced Randal Grichuk’s name first.

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August 22, 2011 9:00 am

Resident Fantasy Genius: Is Prospect Potential Realized?

3

Derek Carty

Checking in on whether a player with high pedigree has a better major-league career than a non-prospect.

Potential is a funny thing. The team that manages to grab the most players who outperform expectations often wins fantasy leagues. Every spring we hear about breakout candidates and which players stand the best chance of outperforming their projections. Often, these breakout candidates are selected based on their tools and their pedigree—their potential. While this kind of subjective and scouting data is very important, few people outside of Major League Baseball have a database with scouting reports on enough players dating back as far as we’d need to run a study to examine what these things actually tell us—not to mention all of the complications that would go into such a study. But there is one freely available tool that I thought might make for an interesting study: Baseball America’s archive of their Top 100 prospect lists dating back to 1990.

Today, I wanted to run a study using this archive as a proxy for pedigree to see how much pedigree matters for players who have already made it to the majors. Once a player is in the majors, does his pedigree make him more likely to break out?

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In the first in a new series of weekly lists, the BP team compiles its nominees for most under-appreciated ballplayers of their times.

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May 19, 2011 9:00 am

Overthinking It: The Over/Under-30 All-Stars

14

Ben Lindbergh

Jose Bautista is poised to trump his first seven seasons in one glorious campaign. What other players have done almost all their damage on only one side of age 30?

If you’ve been paying any attention to current athletic events, you know that Jose Bautista has been busy making the rest of baseball look bad. The 30-year-old slugger is hitting .370/.516/.849, leading the majors in home runs, walks, and runs scored, and serenading himself in the shower with the refrain to Jay-Z’s “30 Something”: “30’s the new 20, I’m so hot still.” (Yes, Bautista prefers the “clean” version.) As Hova notes elsewhere on that track, 30 is “young enough to know the right car to buy, yet grown enough not to put rims on it.” That’s not the kind of old-player skill we generally associate with athletes—it’s more of an old-playa skill, probably—but baseball players do compensate for their declining physical talents by adopting more refined approaches as they leave their third decades behind.

Of course, there comes a point at which no amount of experience and savvy can help a player catch up with a fastball, which is why places on the 25-man roster aren’t lifetime appointments. Bautista’s offensive outburst has been compared to the early-century output of Barry Bonds. Bautista’s recent production is more out of character with his previously established performance level than Bonds’ was, but one of the factors that made Bonds’ record-busting performance so improbable was that it came as he entered his late 30s, typically a time when players retain only a fraction of their former glory. At 30, Bautista is hardly over the hill, but he is a few years past the age at which most players peak.

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