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Articles Tagged Pitching Mechanics 

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09-12

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2

Raising Aces: Angelic Arms
by
Doug Thorburn

07-11

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2

Raising Aces: Breakout Breakdown: Corey Kluber and Garrett Richards
by
Doug Thorburn

07-09

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1

Pitcher Profile: Jake Arrieta
by
Harry Pavlidis

06-27

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4

Raising Aces: Houston, We Have Lift-Off
by
Doug Thorburn

06-20

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6

Raising Aces: A Tale of Two Aces
by
Doug Thorburn

07-26

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1

Raising Aces: There and Back Again
by
Doug Thorburn

06-21

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9

Raising Aces: The Cain Madness and a Troubled Helix
by
Doug Thorburn

05-24

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3

Raising Aces: Splitting the Platoon: Lefty-Phobic Pitchers
by
Doug Thorburn

04-24

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3

Raising Aces: Now Pitching, Bryce Harper
by
Doug Thorburn

04-19

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5

Raising Aces: Trending: National Grade
by
Doug Thorburn

03-29

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13

Raising Aces: Against the Grain
by
Doug Thorburn

04-12

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3

Raising Aces: Dissecting Darvish
by
Doug Thorburn

02-22

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28

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Derek Carty and Michael Jong

12-15

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6

The BP Wayback Machine: PECOTA Takes on Pitching Prospects and Left-Handed Pitchers
by
Nate Silver

03-29

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller
by
David Laurila

10-28

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9

Overthinking It: Ex-Pitching Coach Managers
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-04

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
David Laurila

03-30

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16

Long Tossing
by
Gary Armida

12-20

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Don Wakamatsu
by
David Laurila

05-03

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Ross Grimsley
by
David Laurila

02-06

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5

Prospectus Q&A: Chris Hayes, Part One
by
Rany Jazayerli

10-05

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Paul Byrd
by
David Laurila

10-01

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0

Player Profile: Francisco Rodriguez
by
Marc Normandin, Eric Seidman and Will Carroll

05-18

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Josh Outman
by
David Laurila

02-24

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Doug Thorburn
by
David Laurila

01-27

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Prospectus Q&A: Mike Pagliarulo
by
David Laurila

10-31

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0

Future Shock: Orioles Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

04-20

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes On Right-handed Pitching Prospects
by
Nate Silver

04-12

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes on Pitching Prospects and Left-Handed Pitchers
by
Nate Silver

07-20

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Tom House
by
Jason Grady

03-16

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Future Shock: Taking a Step Back, Part Three
by
Kevin Goldstein

03-03

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Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes on Prospects, Part Four
by
Nate Silver

02-21

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: Top 50 Prospects - Pitchers
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-24

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Prospectus Q&A: Tom House, Part II
by
Jonah Keri

04-08

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Prospectus Q&A: Carlos Gomez
by
Jay Jaffe

02-23

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Prospectus Roundtable: Top 50 Prospects, Part III
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-26

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Prospectus Q&A: Dr. Glenn Fleisig, Part II
by
Jonah Keri

01-23

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Prospectus Q&A: Dr. Glenn Fleisig, Part I
by
Jonah Keri

02-26

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0

The Injury Nexus
by
Nate Silver and Will Carroll

02-17

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Prospectus Q&A: Rick Peterson
by
Jonah Keri

08-08

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0

Prospectus Q&A
by
Stuart Shea

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February 22, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2012 Preseason Preview

28

Derek Carty and Michael Jong

Roundtable discussion of the pressing questions facing the NL East teams as we approach the start of the season

1) After a disappointing sophomore campaign, what can we expect of Jason Heyward going forward?
MJ:
Jason Heyward had an injury-riddled sophomore season in Atlanta, but there is a lot to like about his chances at a rebound campaign in 2012. His offensive line was deflated by a .260 BABIP, but his peripherals were once again stellar. His 11.6 percent walk rate represented a regression from 2010 but cannot be considered poor, and his .162 ISO likewise dropped from the previous year but did not experience a precipitous fall.


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In the wake of the Matt Moore extension, revisit Nate's discussion of the perils of counting on pitching prospects and his remarks on the most promising southpaws.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Last week, the Rays signed young lefty Matt Moore to an extension that should prove to be team-friendly if he stays healthy, but as Nate discussed in an article which originally ran as a "Lies, Damned Lies" column on April 12, 2007, it's never safe to assume that a young pitcher's arm will remain intact.


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March 29, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Andrew Miller

3

David Laurila

The former top prospect discusses his rocky road in the majors, how he has overhauled his pitching mechanics, and his mental approach to the game.

Andrew Miller is an enigma getting another chance. Just how many more he’ll get, or needs, remains to be seen, but it is notable that the flame-throwing southpaw is only 25. Given all he has been through, you’d be excused for thinking he is older.

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October 28, 2010 8:00 am

Overthinking It: Ex-Pitching Coach Managers

9

Ben Lindbergh

Few pitching coaches ever get the opportunity to become major-league skippers.

The Blue Jays unquestionably chose wisely when they named Jay Jaffe GM, but the jury remains out on their signing of Red Sox pitching coach John Farrell to a three-year managerial contract. That’s not to say that Farrell doesn’t seem qualified; on the contrary, the newly minted manager’s resume makes for an impressive read. Farrell spent all or part of eight seasons pitching in the majors—giving him the apparently all-important cultural acclimation to major-league clubhouses that other first-time managers have lacked—before serving as the Indians’ player development director for five years, an experience which, at least in theory, should have imparted the rapport with rookies and appreciation for the bigger picture that some field generals lack.

More recently, he returned to the dugout, earning his first—but, his new employers hope, not his last—World Series ring in his inaugural season as Boston’s pitching coach. In three subsequent seasons spent in that capacity, he presided over the development of Jon Lester and Clay Buchholz, which made him an attractive candidate to oversee Toronto’s talented young rotation. In addition to his work experience, Farrell is well regarded on a personal level throughout the game, and considered media-savvy (a quality that should serve him well in the, um, bustling Canadian baseball media market), which earned him some serious buzz as a managerial candidate well before the Blue Jays’ extended hiring process got underway.

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A conversation about analysis and the game with the former skipper and present-day talking head.

Buck Showalter is in many ways an old-school baseball man, but that doesn’t mean the former Yankees, Diamondbacks, and Rangers skipper doesn‘t value data -- or that he hasn’t for more than three decades. He unmistakably understands the mechanics of the game. Currently an analyst for ESPN, Showalter offered his thoughts on a variety of subjects, including how the game has (and hasn’t) changed, why Paul O’Neill could hit southpaws, why switch-sliders make good switch-hitters, and what makes the Twins the Twins.

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March 30, 2010 4:14 am

Long Tossing

16

Gary Armida

Proponents saying throwing at long distances builds pitchers' arm strength and increases velocity.

Major League Baseball is more or less a standardized industry. Everything a player does can be quantified in some manner. Since the dawning of the information age, teams have trended toward statistical analysis as it gives more definite, calculated answers rather than general feelings that can often lead to overvaluing a player. Unfortunately, that precision hasn’t translated to on-field performance, as gut instincts still rule when it comes to pitcher conditioning. For pitchers, those gut instincts have led to an epidemic of pitching-related injuries. According to statistics compiled and confirmed by Baseball Prospectus' Will Carroll, Major League Baseball has spent more than $500 million in salary on injured pitchers the last two seasons. It is apparent that the majority of teams are just following the herd rather than researching methods to keep pitchers healthy. The result of this lack of exploration has led to the epidemic that Carroll describes.

Allan Jaeger, of Jaeger Sports, believes he has the program that can save pitchers from injury while increasing their velocity. Jaeger’s program is rooted in a traditional baseball exercise, long tossing. Since the early days of baseball, players have been long tossing. Most performed long tossing because they believed it strengthened their arm. Jaeger agrees. "If muscles are inactive for a long enough period of time, or aren't used close to their desired capacities, the life is taken out of them. When muscles are given proper blood flow, oxygen, and range of motion, they are free to work at their optimum capacity. A good long-toss program is the key to giving life to a pitcher’s arm."

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The Mariners' skipper on his relationship with GM Jack Zduriencik, the expectations on his club for 2010, and the acquisitions of Cliff Lee and Chone Figgins.

There are some loud tremors emanating from the Pacific Northwest this offseason, and nobody feels and hears them more than Don Wakamatsu. The Mariners skipper isn't quite quaking with excitement, but with the recent acquisitions of Chone Figgins and Cliff Lee, there is clearly an extra bounce to his step. There may also be an elevated heart rate, as Mount Rainier-sized expectations are already beginning to cascade down upon a team that won 85 games in Wakamatsu's first year at the helm. The 46-year-old skipper talked to Baseball Prospectus via phone-a conversation briefly interrupted by a call from GM Jack Zduriencik-to discuss the season that was, and the future of what clearly seems to be an organization moving in the right direction.

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May 3, 2009 2:15 pm

Prospectus Q&A: Ross Grimsley

3

David Laurila

A successful pitching coach in the Giants organization talks about coaching, catching, and the prospects he's working with.

The San Francisco Giants possess some of the best young pitching in the game, both at the big-league level and down on the farm, and one of the reasons has been the work of Ross Grimsley. Now in his eleventh season in the organization, Grimsley has helped to develop a multitude of young hurlers since joining the coaching ranks a quarter-century ago, most recently receiving plaudits for his influence on one of the top pitching prospects in the game, Madison Bumgarner. A crafty left-hander during his playing days, Grimsley logged 124 wins over 11 big-league seasons, including 18 with the Orioles in 1974, and 20 with the Expos in 1978. Currently the pitching coach at Double-A Connecticut, Grimsley talked about his time in the game, both on the mound and as a teacher.

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A conversation with that rarest of cats in the minor leagues, the inked Wildcat from Northwestern.

Chris Hayes has emerged from the humblest of baseball backgrounds to the doorstep of the major leagues. A walk-on at Northwestern University, Hayes worked his way up to the team's closer his senior year. Following graduation he spent a year in the independent leagues before signing with the Kansas City Royals as an undrafted free agent in 2006.

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October 5, 2008 11:50 am

Prospectus Q&A: Paul Byrd

1

David Laurila

The veteran hurler on setting up the pieces, controlling what you can, and employing the wisdom of others.

Paul Byrd knows his craft. Seen by many as a future pitching coach, the veteran right-hander has become a student of the game over his 13 big-league seasons, adding more than a fair share of guile to his repertoire as he has aged. Acquired by the Red Sox from Cleveland in August, the 37-year-old Byrd has pitched for seven teams overall and has a lifetime record of 108-93, with a 4.38 ERA in 338 games. On the season, Byrd is 11-12 with a 4.60 ERA. David spoke with him after his last regular-season start.

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October 1, 2008 5:47 pm

Player Profile: Francisco Rodriguez

0

Marc Normandin, Eric Seidman and Will Carroll

With the saves record set, will he repeat his 2002 heroics in the postseason? And will his arm eventually fall off, or won't it?

Francisco Rodriguez has easily been one of the top closers in baseball since he was handed the full-time job back in 2005, and before that he was one of the game's top relievers, period. This is why it's no surprise that he's at the center of the discussions as to why the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim were able to win 100 games this year-but was 2008, the year he set the record for most saves in a season, the best year of his career, or should we be worried that this isn't the same K-Rod we watched grow up in front of us on national television?

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The Phillies pitching prospect has endured a lot of changes the past few years, including a completely rebuilt delivery and a move to the bullpen.

As far as highly-regarded pitching prospects go, Josh Outman isn't particularly unique, but he used to be. Philadelphia's pick in the 10th round of the 2005 draft, the 23-year-old left-hander features a conventional pitching motion that has been completely retooled from the unorthodox and biomechanically-structured delivery he grew up with. David talked to Outman about his old motion, and what the change to a more traditional pitching style has meant to his career.

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