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07-01

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4

Baseball Therapy: Do Some Pitches Do More Damage Than Others?
by
Russell A. Carleton

07-01

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1

Moonshot: Survival of the Fittest: Pitchers
by
Robert Arthur

05-30

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3

Working the Count: The Five-Day Pitcher Injury Zone
by
Noah Woodward

05-28

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13

The Lineup Card: 13 Pitcher Injuries We Wish We Could Undo
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-22

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 455: Stan Conte on What We Need to Know About Pitcher Injuries
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

05-15

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3

Overthinking It: Have Tommy John Surgery, Sign Long-Term Contract?
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-18

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6

Five to Watch: National League Prospects
by
Bret Sayre

08-06

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13

Baseball Therapy: Prioritizing the Pitcher's Health
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-09

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 199: Pitchers Putting on Sunscreen/The Astros and Clubhouse Chemistry
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-21

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5

BP Unfiltered: Tommy Hanson, Shaun Marcum, and Causes for Concern
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-01

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3

Pitcher Profile: New Arms of the Week, First Edition
by
Harry Pavlidis

02-18

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23

Baseball Therapy: What Really Predicts Pitcher Injuries?
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-28

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25

Baseball Therapy: Fact or Fiction: The Verducci Effect
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-23

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 124: A World Without Easily Injured Pitchers/Hitter BABIP, and Whether Mike Trout Was Lucky/What We Think About Booing
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-18

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3

A Little Relief
by
Jonah Birenbaum

01-02

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 110: Players with Criminal Pasts/How Much Do Pitcher Hitting, Fielding, and Baserunning Matter?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-05

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5

Raising Aces: For Those About to Watch (We Salute You)
by
Doug Thorburn

09-27

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7

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 51: What the Rockies Knew About Ubaldo/The Eternal Torii Hunter/Declining Dan Haren
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-11

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13

Pebble Hunting: How Pitchers React to Home Runs
by
Sam Miller

06-29

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3

The Stats Go Marching In: Should Pitchers Change Their Between-Innings Routine?
by
Max Marchi

06-29

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9

Prospectus Q&A: Pitcher Workloads and Innings Limits: Two Industry Perspectives
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-04

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11

Future Shock Blog: Draft Day Dream Crushing
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-31

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7

On the Beat: Fireballer in the Hole
by
John Perrotto

04-23

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Bartolo Colon and the Comeback Kids
by
Jay Jaffe

03-12

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12

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Rotation Rumble
by
Jay Jaffe

03-07

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43

Prospectus Hit and Run: Inspecting the Spectrum, Part IV: The Designated Hitter Question
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Pitching to the Score
by
Greg Spira

11-22

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30

Spinning Yarn: How Does Quality of Contact Relate to BABIP?
by
Mike Fast

11-16

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41

Spinning Yarn: Who Controls How Hard the Ball is Hit?
by
Mike Fast

10-31

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: A Weighty Matter
by
Jay Jaffe

05-24

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 1
by
Tom Tango

03-17

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15

The BP Wayback Machine: How Much Control Do Hurlers Have?
by
Voros McCracken

02-25

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Are You Experienced?
by
Jay Jaffe

02-16

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59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

01-27

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21

Ahead in the Count: Testing SIERA
by
Matt Swartz

01-17

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0

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching
by
Matt Swartz

12-15

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27

Ahead in the Count: Ground-ballers: Better than You Think
by
Matt Swartz

11-11

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7

Spinning Yarn: Pitcher Release Points
by
Mike Fast

10-26

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8

Spinning Yarn: Interpreting Pitch Classifications
by
Mike Fast

10-14

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20

Spinning Yarn: The Glavine Line
by
Mike Fast

08-10

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32

Checking the Numbers: '90s Nine, Meet the '00s Ten
by
Eric Seidman

05-28

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1

Ahead in the Count: Hometown Discounts
by
Matt Swartz

03-30

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16

Long Tossing
by
Gary Armida

12-11

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9

Checking the Numbers: On the Swing
by
Eric Seidman

09-29

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9

Ahead in the Count: Pitcher BABIP by Count
by
Matt Swartz

09-18

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3

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part Two
by
Eric Seidman

09-10

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12

Changing Speeds: Situational Pitching
by
Ken Funck

08-28

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5

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part One
by
Eric Seidman

06-21

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25

Prospectus Idol Entry: Do You Hate Pitchers' Won-Loss Record? Blame Your Grandfather
by
Matthew Knight

05-24

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31

Prospectus Idol Entry: The Importance of Throwing First Pitch Strikes
by
Brian Oakchunas

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The final word on whether the popular theory holds water or is fatally flawed.

Last week, Sports Illustrated writer and Jason Parks man-crush Tom Verducci put out his annual column warning about a specific type of player: A young pitcher (25 or younger) who saw a significant increase in his workload in the previous season over the season before that (defined as an increase of at least 30 innings, including postseason and minor-league work). Verducci claims that this sort of pitcher is in danger of either a significant injury and/or a performance decline in 2013 because his 2012 was much busier than his 2011. It's a proposition that's become known as the Verducci Effect.

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Ben and Sam answer listener emails about pitcher injuries and pitching prospects, hitter BABIPs (specifically Mike Trout's), and whether they boo baseball players.



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January 18, 2013 5:00 am

A Little Relief

3

Jonah Birenbaum

Rafael Soriano is off the market, but there are still some potentially useful bullpen arms to be had.

Earlier this week, Jon Heyman tweeted a short list of free agent relievers who could be a reasonable fit for the back end of the Blue Jays’ bullpen. Whether you credit Heyman with clairvoyance or good contacts, it just so happened that one of the names conspicuously absent from that list was Rafael Soriano. Hours later, the 33-year-old right-hander became a member of the Washington Nationals, signing a two-year, $28-million deal with a vesting option for 2015.

In snapping up Soriano, the Nats removed the best available free agent reliever from the market, but they left an assortment of lower-tier options for teams still looking to bolster their bullpens. Ken Rosenthal later listed several teams still interested in picking up a reliever, identifying the Rays, Tigers, Mariners, Marlins, and Mets as potential suitors. Here are some of the options they can consider:

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Ben and Sam answer listener emails about how players with criminal pasts should be treated and how much pitchers' non-pitching skills matter.



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October 5, 2012 8:00 am

Raising Aces: For Those About to Watch (We Salute You)

5

Doug Thorburn

One pitcher per playoff team who makes a convincing case in favor of watching every pitch of post-season baseball.

This season may have lacked the dramatic flare of 2011’s frantic finish, but the stretch drive of 2012 has been thrilling in its own right, with division races coming down to the final day and one unlikely club making its only ascension to the top of its division at the most opportune time.  After a day of reflection, we are now staring at an unprecedented slate of play-in games to the postseason tournament, where a season's worth of hard work comes down to nine innings of play.

October can be bittersweet for many loyal fans whose teams fell short of the playoffs. Football will lure those whose residual frustration is too great to bear, while others will adopt a more successful team to support through the postseason. But some of our baseball-loving brethren will follow the action regardless of rooting interest, and to those fellow baseball junkies who cherish every last pitch of October baseball: I salute you. To enhance your enjoyment of the next few weeks, here's a list of 10 pitchers who'll be in action this October—one per playoff team—and what makes them worth watching.

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Ben and Sam discuss the decline of Ubaldo Jimenez and whether the Rockies saw it coming when they sent him to Cleveland, then talk about the Angels' off-season plans for Torii Hunter and Dan Haren.

Ben and Sam discuss the decline of Ubaldo Jimenez and whether the Rockies saw it coming when they sent him to Cleveland, then talk about the Angels' off-season plans for Torii Hunter and Dan Haren.

Episode 51: "What the Rockies Knew About Ubaldo/The Eternal Torii Hunter/Declining Dan Haren"

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July 11, 2012 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: How Pitchers React to Home Runs

13

Sam Miller

What do pitchers look like just after allowing one of the longest home runs of the season?

If we learned anything from the Home Run Derby, it's that people enjoy watching home runs go far. We didn't actually learn that from the Home Run Derby. We knew that all along! It is a pretty well-established thing about baseball. I suppose we could just as easily say if we learned anything from the Home Run Derby, it's that large physical bodies such as the earth create an attractive pull whereby things that are flung up in the air will be drawn back down, the distance of flight correlating to the force exerted on the object. If you knew nothing before the Home Run Derby, you learned about gravity, and you learned that people enjoy watching big home runs. This is an introductory paragraph, and it is complete.

There is one small subset of the population we might not expect would enjoy watching big home runs: the pitchers who allow those home runs. We might not expect them to enjoy watching big home runs, but maybe they do. Maybe they have perspective on the thing. Maybe they appreciate the aesthetics of a baseball soaring impossibly deep into the sky. Maybe they're fans, just like you. Maybe not. I honestly don't know. 

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Are pitchers less effective after taking a break between innings? And if so, should teams do anything about it?

When the third out is recorded, the pitcher goes back to the bench, puts on a jacket (or wraps a towel around his throwing arm), and sits on the bench for the other half of the inning. When his teammates are retired, he slowly trots back to the mound and delivers a handful of warm-up pitches, and he’s ready to go.

In one of my previous columns, I noticed that pitchers throw their fastballs slowest when there is nobody out and the bases are empty—in most of the cases, that’s at the beginning of the inning. One of the questions that came to my mind was whether they are a bit rusty after spending some time doing nothing on the bench.

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An expert on biomechanics and a team source talk about their approaches to evaluating and managing pitcher workloads.

For today's article on impervious and not-so-impervious pitchers, I got my David Laurila on, speaking to Glenn Fleisig of the American Sports Medicine Institute—whose name is almost always followed by the phrase, "the world's foremost authority on biomechanics"—and to a scouting executive from a major-league club (affectionately and frequently referred to in the article as "the executive"). Both had a lot to say, and not everything they said fit into the article. One of the things I failed to fit in was their extended perspectives on pitcher workloads and the efficacy of innings limits, so I'm rectifying that by posting both takes here. Dr. Fleisig comes first, followed by the team official.

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Take a deep breath before assuming your favorite team's pick today is a future star.

Unless you live under a rock, and no offense to those living under a rock, you know the draft takes places tonight. The draft creates a lot of excitement, but it's important to be realistic as well about the player that gets added to your favorite. Whomever your favorite team takes, it's not time to start inserting him into future lineups. The attrition rate for top picks has improved dramatically, yet remains brutal. So for a little dose of reality here are the top five hitters and pitchers for each slot. Of the 47 players taken in draft history, this is the cream of the crop, and it can be a bit of an eye-opener. A big note of thanks to Bradley Ankrom for doing the leg work here.

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Dusty Baker feels that Aroldis Chapman's best use right now is as Cincinnati's closer, and a conversation with Jesus Montero.

When Sparky Lyle strode from the bullpen the mound at Yankee Stadium during his days as a premier relief pitches in the mid- to late 1970s, organist Eddie Layton would play "Pomp and Circumstance." That probably wouldn't work as a ballpark song these days, but to hear Dusty Baker tell it, perhaps the traditional graduation accompaniment should be played on the sound system at Great American Ball Park when Reds reliever Aroldis Chapman takes the hill.

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April 23, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Bartolo Colon and the Comeback Kids

1

Jay Jaffe

Though recent trends might indicate otherwise, aged pitchers rarely return to form after year-long layoffs.

Sure, it came against an Angels lineup whose centerpiece, Albert Pujols, has yet to get untracked, but it was difficult not to be impressed with Bartolo Colon's eight shutout innings last Wednesday. For one thing, it marked the 38-year-old Oakland righty's second consecutive scoreless start; he had tossed seven scoreless against the Mariners on April 13. For another, he reeled off a streak of 38 consecutive strikes, running from the second pitch of the fifth inning through the seventh pitch of the eighth inning, a span that included balls in play; he allowed only a single and a double during that time. Pitch-by-pitch records only go back to 1988, so there's no definitive account of whether Colon set a record, but via the San Francisco Chronicle's Susan Slusser, the next-highest known total was 30 in a row by Tim Wakefield in 1998.

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