CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Pitchers Hitting 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

06-24

comment icon

0

BP Unfiltered: Bartolo on the Bases
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-24

comment icon

17

The Stats Go Marching In: Do Pitchers Forget How to Hit in the Minors?
by
Max Marchi

12-15

comment icon

6

The BP Wayback Machine: PECOTA Takes on Pitching Prospects and Left-Handed Pitchers
by
Nate Silver

11-22

comment icon

30

Spinning Yarn: How Does Quality of Contact Relate to BABIP?
by
Mike Fast

11-18

comment icon

15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Why Having a Quick Hook Helps
by
Mitchel Lichtman

09-30

comment icon

21

Baseball ProGUESTus: A New Take on Plate Discipline--Redefining the Zone
by
Matt Lentzner

08-17

comment icon

11

Spinning Yarn: Why are Batters Hit by Pitches?
by
Mike Fast

08-04

comment icon

8

The BP Wayback Machine: Beautiful Theories and Ugly Facts
by
Dan Fox

06-23

comment icon

17

Spitballing: Checks and Balances
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

06-22

comment icon

2

Clubhouse Confidential: Helping Their Own Cause
by
Marc Carig

06-15

comment icon

1

Fantasy Beat: The New Approach to Pitching
by
Jason Collette

04-28

comment icon

3

The BP Wayback Machine: The Myth of the Golden Age
by
Dan Fox

03-17

comment icon

15

The BP Wayback Machine: How Much Control Do Hurlers Have?
by
Voros McCracken

04-02

comment icon

11

Checking the Numbers: SHINO-myte!
by
Eric Seidman

08-28

comment icon

5

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part One
by
Eric Seidman

06-28

comment icon

1

Prospectus Q&A: Rudy Jaramillo
by
David Laurila

02-19

comment icon

18

Attack of the Finesse Pitchers
by
Eric Seidman

05-29

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: Evaluating Pitcher Hitting
by
Nate Silver

05-15

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: The Lost Generation?
by
Nate Silver

05-13

comment icon

0

Furcal En Fuego
by
Eric Seidman

02-24

comment icon

0

Prospectus Q&A: Doug Thorburn
by
David Laurila

08-30

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Tilting the Playing Field
by
Dan Fox

08-21

comment icon

0

Prospectus Matchups: Micah Owings
by
Jim Baker

08-16

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Putting the Pedal to the Metal
by
Dan Fox

07-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Hit List: Pinch-Hitter's Edition
by
Marc Normandin

04-12

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes on Pitching Prospects and Left-Handed Pitchers
by
Nate Silver

02-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Organizational Rankings
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-18

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Myth of the Golden Age
by
Dan Fox

11-30

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: A Second Look at First Contact
by
Dan Fox

10-16

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

comment icon

0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

comment icon

0

Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

09-19

comment icon

0

Prospectus Hit List: Week of September 19th
by
Jay Jaffe

08-29

comment icon

0

Prospectus Hit List: Week of August 28
by
Marc Normandin

08-22

comment icon

0

Prospectus Hit List: Week of August 20
by
Jay Jaffe

05-18

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Moral Hazards of the Hit Batsmen
by
Dan Fox

05-04

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Beautiful Theories and Ugly Facts
by
Dan Fox

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

Over a decade after their advent sent shockwaves through the sabermetric world, we gaze back to the dawn of defense-independent pitching statistics.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Now that BABIP has long since hit the mainstream, join us in flashing back to the day when Voros changed how we thought about pitching and defense, just over ten years after his landmark article originally ran on January 23, 2001.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 2, 2010 2:15 pm

Checking the Numbers: SHINO-myte!

11

Eric Seidman

Those who switch-hit in name only make up a rare cadre all their own.

A few weeks ago I found myself engrossed in a Tommy Bennett article on the Braves and stumbled upon his usage of the term SHINO when describing Melky Cabrera. The acronym stands for Switch-Hitter-In-Name-Only, and refers to some hitters with 'S' or 'Both' under the Bats column on their player pages, and specifically the ones who might want to think about changing that status. They certainly switch, but they don’t offer much in the way of hitting. The term tickled my fancy, in part due to the fact that I’ve had an article on switch-hitters in my to-do queue for over a year now that was set to focus on those who consistently struggled from one side of the plate. Though the title of that shelved article involved Bobby Kielty and not this term; as we’ll see, maybe Kielty should have been included in the title.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 28, 2009 2:00 pm

Checking the Numbers: Whiffing the Pitcher, Part One

5

Eric Seidman

Different hurlers have different capacities for pitcher-on-pitcher violence.

Cliff Lee has performed at an incredibly high level since joining the Phillies rotation last month, compiling a minuscule 0.68 ERA in 40 frames, effectively making Phans phorget that they were ever engaged in the Roy Halladay sweepstakes. Lee's junior circuit strikeout rates were generally of the good but not great variety, somewhere in the range of 6.1 and 6.8 per nine innings, yet his 39 whiffs while wearing red pinstripes has resulted in a fantastic rate. Switching to the National League tends to improve a pitcher's performance for a few reasons, but the most obvious of them involves the chance to face pitchers (Ed. Note: Phlailing?) as opposed to additional hitters with Papi Hafner Thome-level power. In his five Phillies starts, Lee has faced the opposing pitcher seven times, recording strikeouts on four different occasions. While the sample here is much too small to make any sort of definitive claim, the underlying idea that his strikeout total has been padded by opportunities to whiff the pitcher piqued my interest.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 28, 2009 11:36 am

Prospectus Q&A: Rudy Jaramillo

1

David Laurila

A conversation with one of the game's great masters on the art and practice of hitting.

When it comes to teaching hitting, few do it as well as Rudy Jaramillo. Currently in his 15th season with the Rangers-the longest tenure of all big-league hitting coaches-the 58-year-old native of Beeville, Texas is arguably the best in the business. Called "a Hall of Fame hitting coach" by Alex Rodriguez, and "the best there is" by Michael Young, Jaramillo is a member of both the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame and the Hispanic Heritage Baseball Museum Hall of Fame. Jaramillo recently sat down to talk about his favorite subject: the art and science of hitting a baseball

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 19, 2009 12:05 pm

Attack of the Finesse Pitchers

18

Eric Seidman

How do the guys who attack the zone with something less do something more with it than you might expect?

"Hitting is timing. Pitching is upsetting timing."-Warren Spahn

Prior to his July 10 meeting with the Phillies, Albert Pujols was sporting a gaudy .346/.467/.613 line with just 28 strikeouts in 334 plate appearances. The season's eventual MVP had been giving opposing pitchers fits, and it seemed unlikely that a pitcher with a 4.50 defense-neutral ERA and an average game score of 49 could do anything to change that. The Phillies, however, were counting on a starting pitcher with just those numbers in one Jamie Moyer, who was preparing to engage in another prototypical David vs. Goliath showdown with the game's best hitter, an imposing and muscle-bound 230-pounder standing no more than 60'6" away from a scrawny 46-year-old lefty with a fastball slower than Joe Sheehan's.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Projecting the value of the best-hitting pitchers, as well as the worst.

In the six years that I've generated PECOTA forecasts, I've never bothered to run hitting projections for pitchers. In fact, I've regarded pitcher hitting as something of a nuisance; I specifically screen out any pitchers so that they won't be selected as comparable players. This isn't an aesthetic judgment by any means-watching pitchers try (and fail) to hit is one of my favorite pastimes. But since even the pitchers who make 35 starts a year won't usually get more than 80 or 90 plate appearances, I've generally figured that it wasn't quite worth the trouble.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

May 15, 2008 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: The Lost Generation?

0

Nate Silver

Ease up there, Hemingway, we're talking about pitchers, and whether we're missing a few from the last couple of decades.

When we see the level of offense go up or down in baseball-and it has been down dramatically this season-we tend to attribute it to everything other than the players themselves. In any given downturn, it's the bats, or the baseballs, or the ballparks, or the drugs that the players are injecting themselves with. Or all of those things. But what if it isn't all about context? What if, when offense is up, it literally does mean that there aren't very many good pitchers?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

May 13, 2008 12:00 am

Furcal En Fuego

0

Eric Seidman

The shape of the blistering-hot performance of the Dodgers shortstop.

Past experience can generate expectations. Certainly, when they signed Rafael Furcal to a three-year, $39 million deal following the 2005 season, the Dodgers believed that the former Braves leadoff batter would provide a significant spark to their offense. He did not disappoint in 2006, finishing 14th in NL MVP voting. Last year, however, a nagging ankle injury suffered in spring training kept him out of action for the first couple of weeks as well as the final weeks of the season; it also hindered his production level during the 138 games in which he played. A player whose modus operandi involves speed playing with an ankle injury is not a good combination.

Similarly, when Joe Torre signed on to manage the team this offseason, he was fresh off of managing a shortstop that happened to be the longtime face of the most prominent franchise in sports. He may have known his new shortstop could produce at an all-star level even, after that rough 2007. Suffice it to say he could not possibly have had any idea Furcal would be this productive.

Read the full article...

An in-depth discussion about mechanics with the motion analysis coordinator and coach of the National Pitching Association.

Pitching is both an art and a science, and from youth leagues to the big leagues, so is the challenge of keeping pitchers healthy. The National Pitching Association (NPA) is on the cutting edge of research and instruction on all three fronts, and many of their concepts are shared in their forthcoming book, Arm Action, Arm Path, and the Perfect Pitch: a Science-Based Guide to Pitching Health and Performance. David talked to the NPA's motion analysis coordinator and coach, Doug Thorburn.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 30, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Tilting the Playing Field

0

Dan Fox

Returning to a subject from this past winter, Dan digs in to discuss the all-time greats.

"It is the best game because the players look like us. They are not seven feet tall, they don’t weigh 350 pounds, and they don’t bench-press 650. We can relate to them. We can see them—they’re not obscured by some hideous face mask, and they don’t play behind a wall of Plexiglas—we can touch them and we can feel them. I see Greg Maddux with his shirt off, with his concave chest and no discernible muscles, and I marvel: This is one of the six greatest pitchers in the history of the game? I see Tony Gwynn with his shirt off and I see a short, fat guy with the smallest hands I've ever seen on an athlete, and I wonder: 'This is the best hitter since Ted Williams?'...They are regular guys, at least most of them, who just happen to be really, really good at something that everyone else is not."
--Tim Kurkjian, from chapter one of Is This a Great Game, or What?: From A-Rod's Heart to Zim's Head--My 25 Years in Baseball


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 21, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Matchups: Micah Owings

0

Jim Baker

Inspired by current events, Jim recalls history's great two-way all-stars for a day.

On Saturday, Micah Owings of the Arizona Diamondbacks had one of the better hitting performances of the season, getting 11 total bases and driving in six runs. There will be better outings by players this year, but not a whole lot of them. Certainly, there won't be any by pitchers, the fraternity to which Owings belongs and one not picky about its members' skills with the lumber. In fact, Owings day with the stick is arguably one of the best ever by a pitcher. His outstanding hitting performance was coupled with a quality start, too, which brings up the question, how does this rate in terms of combined performance?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

What happens when pitching in a pinch? Do pitchers have something extra that they can put on the ball when they're in a jam?

"I think we just played the way we thought we should play. We swung it better, we had clutch hitting, we had clutch pitching. If you put all those things together you have a chance to win a few more games and be a little more exciting. That's what we are doing right now."
-White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen commenting after beating the Mariners 5-3 on August 10th


Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>