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Articles Tagged Pat Burrell 

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May 21, 2012 3:31 am

Out of Left Field: When You Can't Buy a Loss

8

Matthew Kory

Being on the edge of history in Philadelphia.

I spent 10 years living in Philadelphia. I moved there on a lark, intending to leave almost immediately, but every time I’d try, I’d fail. I got the first job I cared about there, did the dating thing, met my wife*, attended and graduated from graduate school, and had my children there, all in the city.

* Me: Hello, I’m Matt. Woman: Hello, I’m your wife.

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May 27, 2011 12:12 am

Fantasy Beat: The DH Conundrum

9

Jason Collette

Teams dish out the dough for players whose only task is to mash, but they don't always get a good return.

The designated hitter is one of those principles that seem to be a lot better in theory than in practice for most American League franchises. In theory, AL clubs can replace their feeble-hitting pitchers with a big, strong bat that will help the offense’s efficiency. But those big hitters are not always plentiful for some teams and not affordable for others. For every Edgar Martinez out there, a team ends up with Pat Burrell, as the only guarantee a designated hitter gives a team is the right to choose not to put the pitcher in the batting order.

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November 1, 2010 8:00 am

On the Beat: Dealing with the DH

3

John Perrotto

A slumping Pat Burrell makes finding an extra stick that much tougher for Bruce Bochy, along with other news and notes from around the major leagues.

ARLINGTON—If Bruce Bochy had made the lineup move during the regular season, no one would have batted an eye. It simply would have been a case of giving a slumping hitter a day off to regain his bearings.

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Thursday night, the Tampa Bay Rays defeated the Philadelphia Phillies to take the three-game interleague series two games to one. Rematches of the previous year's World Series combatants have been a fascinating byproduct of interleague play. Even more fascinating is the role Pat Burrell plays in this one.

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December 12, 2008 3:49 pm

Prospectus Today: Over-Correcting and Over-Spending

37

Joe Sheehan

The Phillies lurch even further to the left with their new pick for left field.

Pat Burrell at one year and $16 million, or Raul Ibanez for three years and $30 million? I'm pretty sure that there's a right answer to this question, and just as sure that the Phillies didn't land on it.

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Derek follows the Phillies' pursuit of the wild card as they try to shoot down the Rocket.

Voters indicated that the Astros game was appealing as much for the visiting team as for the living legend on the mound. Coming in, the Phillies are alive in the wild-card race, tied with the Giants and trailing the Padres by 2 1/2 games. Since they traded Bobby Abreu to the Yankees, the Phillies have posted a 25-17 record, Ryan Howard has hit 21 homers--one every other game--and driven in 51 runs. Since the All-Star break, Howard leads all batters with a 1320 OPS, head and shoulders above the next man on that leaderboard--Atlanta's Adam LaRoche, with an OPS of 1174. The Phillies have the top offense in the league by runs scored (773), are second in OBP (.344), and third in SLG (.445). They have hit the third-most home runs in the league (195), largely on the strength of Ryan Howard's 56 homers. Abreu or no Abreu, they're an offensive juggernaut.

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July 15, 2004 12:00 am

Burrell's Bounceback

0

Michael Rawdon

One thing about playing fantasy baseball: it forces you to ask--and answer--some questions you'd otherwise never think twice about. One of the ones a friend and I debated this past off-season was: Is Phillies outfielder Pat Burrell worth keeping for the 2004 season? For what it's worth, Baseball Prospectus 2004 had this to say about Burrell: "Burrell's batting average dropped 73 points from 2002 to 2003, the 42nd-largest drop in history for a player with 500 at-bats in both seasons. That's bad enough, but there's only one other player above him who, like him, didn't hit .300 before plummeting. What happened?" Thing is, batting average is one of the most volatile stats in baseball; when it spikes, we call it a "career year," and when it falls off a cliff we call it...well, a lot of things, not many of them printable. But take another look: While Burrell's batting average declined in 2003, his hitting peripherals--patience and power--remained very close to levels which he'd previously achieved...

For what it's worth, Baseball Prospectus 2004 had this to say about Burrell: "Burrell's batting average dropped 73 points from 2002 to 2003, the 42nd-largest drop in history for a player with 500 at-bats in both seasons. That's bad enough, but there's only one other player above him who, like him, didn't hit .300 before plummeting. What happened?"

Thing is, batting average is one of the most volatile stats in baseball; when it spikes, we call it a "career year," and when it falls off a cliff we call it...well, a lot of things, not many of them printable. But take another look: While Burrell's batting average declined in 2003, his hitting peripherals--patience and power--remained very close to levels which he'd previously achieved:

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The Diamondbacks hope Raul Mondesi can help their slumping offense. Angel Berroa deserves the Rookie of the Year award. Jose Mesa v. Pat Burrell, Phillies duel to the death. These and other news and notes out of Arizona, Kansas City, and Philadelphia in today's Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Snakes Offense Lacks Bite: Arizona fought through an injury apocalypse before coming to rest one game back of the Phillies in the NL Wild Card race at the All-Star break. Once they got their Shaq and Kobe back, Arizona was supposed to cruise to 90+ wins and a playoff birth. Instead, thanks to an offense that has provided only 2.7 runs per game in the second half, they went in the opposite direction and now sit at 59-54 after last night's second straight win over the Expos. After scoring more runs than any team in the National League last year, what has happened to Arizona's bats? Their offensive production at first base, second base, and right field has fallen off dramatically from last year:
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    April 17, 2003 12:00 am

    Prospectus Today: Hiding Your Weakness

    0

    Joe Sheehan

    The Phillies are 9-6, tied for first in the NL East. Even after a couple of low-scoring nights against the Marlins, they lead the world in runs scored. I mention that because this is going to seem like a strange time to pick on their offense. Bear with me. In my NL East preview, I wrote the following: "It is interesting to look at the Phillies' lineup and see just how many slots have major platoon issues. Jim Thome and Bobby Abreu routinely lose 150 to 300 points of slugging against lefties, while Polanco and Mike Lieberthal are everyday players in name only; neither hits right-handers well enough to justify his lineup spot or salary. The Phillies might get away with this during the regular season, but it's hard to envision them winning a short playoff series against a good manager, one willing to exploit these weaknesses." Here are the career platoon splits, through Tuesday, for the eight Phillies starters and their current center fielder. They're listed in the most common order in which they've appeared.

    In my NL East preview, I wrote the following:

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    The recent injury to Rico Brogna highlights a baseball development that, until now, has been only surmised: Terry Francona and the Phillies front office are hopped up on goofballs. Are they waiting for Ron Gant to break his leg before announcing that Kevin Sefcik will now be the full-time starter because he can save eight runs a game purely by virtue of his glove?

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