CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Futures Guide 2014 is Now Available in Paperback and Three E-book Formats.

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Park Factors 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

05-28

comment icon

9

Skewed Left: The Real Future Yankees
by
Zachary Levine

12-21

comment icon

10

BP Unfiltered: The Philosophy of Park Factors
by
Colin Wyers

05-11

comment icon

1

The Stats Go Marching In: All About Velocity
by
Max Marchi

09-22

comment icon

4

Manufactured Runs: A Walk in the Park
by
Colin Wyers

06-23

comment icon

1

Manufactured Runs: Batted Balls
by
Colin Wyers

10-06

comment icon

6

Playoff Prospectus: Post-Season Ballparks
by
Clay Davenport

09-07

comment icon

3

Ahead in the Count: Home-Field Advantage, Part Five
by
Matt Swartz

05-24

comment icon

80

Prospectus Idol Entry: Baseball Prospectus Basics: Park Factors
by
Brian Cartwright

01-31

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Back to the Drawing Board
by
Dan Fox

12-20

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Issue of the Day, and Ranging into the Outfield
by
Dan Fox

10-23

comment icon

0

Prospectus Toolbox: A Tale of Two Ballparks
by
Derek Jacques

08-03

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Advancing in Context
by
Dan Fox

08-03

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Something's Rotten in Den...ver
by
Joe Sheehan

11-16

comment icon

0

Can Of Corn: The Case for Pettitte
by
Dayn Perry

11-03

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: Homeland Defense
by
James Click

07-26

comment icon

0

Can Of Corn: Putting the Park Back in Park Factors
by
Dayn Perry

03-10

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: The Only Constant Is Change
by
James Click

03-07

comment icon

0

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui
by
Erik Siegrist

02-10

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: More Time in the Park
by
James Click

02-03

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: Park Effects on Pitcher Types
by
James Click

01-12

comment icon

0

The Lowe-Down
by
James Click

11-09

comment icon

0

Time to Get PADE Again
by
James Click

08-16

comment icon

0

How Parks Affect Baserunning
by
James Click

07-30

comment icon

0

Park Factor Review
by
Clay Davenport

04-20

comment icon

0

Looking Ahead
by
Boyd Nation

10-27

comment icon

0

A TAD Here or There
by
James Click

10-09

comment icon

2

Getting PADE
by
James Click

06-17

comment icon

0

Rockies' #634
by
Boyd Nation

04-11

comment icon

0

Breaking Balls: Environmental Control
by
Derek Zumsteg

08-14

comment icon

0

The Daily Prospectus: Park Effects
by
Joe Sheehan

04-18

comment icon

0

The Daily Prospectus: Even More on Park Factors
by
Joe Sheehan

03-05

comment icon

0

Lost in America
by
Keith Scherer

02-14

comment icon

0

What's That Park Like?
by
Rich Rifkin

09-15

comment icon

0

A Quick and Dirty Guide to 1998 Park Factors
by
Greg Spira

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

Jeff Cirillo's comments about the baseballs used at Coors Field were right on the money.

The Associated Press reported a story yesterday that pushed me to do research I'd been wanting to do for a while. Tuesday afternoon, Brewers utility infielder Jeff Cirillo pointed out what should have been obvious for some time: that the Rockies' use of a humidor for storing game balls has gone past the point of a minor correction for atmospheric conditions and become a means to creating a pitchers' park. Cirillo cited little more than the way a ball felt in his hand and second-hand comments by his teammates, but he did add this:

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 16, 2005 12:00 am

Can Of Corn: The Case for Pettitte

0

Dayn Perry

A look at detailed park factors turns the NL Cy Young race on its head.

However, my prevailing gripe is that Andy Pettitte received short shrift in the chase for the NL Cy Young from credentialed voters and statheads alike. There's a reason for this, and it touches on a larger issue that's of much import. That issue is this: the way we employ park factors in the analytical community is wrongheaded, and it needs to change posthaste.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 3, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: Homeland Defense

0

James Click

James takes a look at the year-end Park Adjusted Defensive Efficiency numbers and discovers a new reason for home field advantage.

Because I've been lazy and haven't turned Park Adjusted Defensive Efficiency (PADE) into a regular stat report yet, I was recently running the end of season numbers for a few readers and fellow authors who were curious how things shook out. Before we get going any further, here they are. PADE is expressed as a percentage, so a PADE of 1.00 means the team turned 1% more balls in play into outs than a league average defense given their park.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 26, 2005 12:00 am

Can Of Corn: Putting the Park Back in Park Factors

0

Dayn Perry

Too often, teams ignore granular park effects when it comes to putting together a lineup. According to Dayn, it's not just where you play, but from which side you play.

The (excruciatingly obvious) recognition that environment affects the game on the field has made impressive inroads in recent years. It's not uncommon these days to hear rank-and-file fans or mainstream analysts paying qualitative heed to this notion, which is a good thing. In seamhead circles, most commonly this discussion takes the form of park effects, which, as you know, entails making statistical calibrations to reflect the tendencies of a particular ballpark. After all, a run scored in Dodger Stadium in 1968 isn't the same as one scored in the Baker Bowl in 1932 or Coors Field circa 1998.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 10, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: The Only Constant Is Change

0

James Click

James Click takes another look at park factors, finding more variance than expected.

Since then, there have been quite a few people talking about predictions for the upcoming season, and adjusting for players in new parks is an essential part of that process. Players like Shawn Green--heading from Los Angeles to Arizona--are likely to see a boost in their raw numbers despite no actual gain, or even loss, in their performance. Understanding these changes is essential to running both fantasy teams and actual teams.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

March 7, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui

0

Erik Siegrist

Taking park factors to the next level.

But a player's home ballpark only applies to half their games. What about the other half? Road games never enter into the equation. Conventional wisdom says that a team's away games are fairly evenly distributed, and the aggregate impact of all those different road parks will even out.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 10, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: More Time in the Park

0

James Click

Two hypotheses down, one to go: James Click tries again to divine truth from park factors.

Last week was spent checking to see if groundball pitchers were less affected by park factors than flyball pitchers are, a theory based on the assumption that park factors are based largely on outfield dimensions. This turned out not to be the case. Months before that was a little foray into park factors and baserunning attempt and success rates, checking to see if perhaps home teams got some of their inherent advantage from knowing how the ball bounces in their yard better than their visiting opponents do. Again, the theory did not pan out.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 3, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: Park Effects on Pitcher Types

0

James Click

James Click launches his new column with a look at whether groundball and flyball pitchers are affected differently by parks. The results surprised him.

After taking a detailed look at the Dodgers' acquisition of Derek Lowe, a number of readers wrote in to discuss the hundreds of new field-level seats being added to Dodger Stadium. The general question was: "Did I consider this in my research, and if not, how do I think it will affect Lowe and the Dodgers in general?" The answers I provided over e-mail were: "No, I didn't, and it should increase general offense in the park. Because that should mainly be a result of a few more foul pop-ups lost to the seats, Lowe would be affected less by these changes than other pitchers because he's such an extreme groundball pitcher."

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 12, 2005 12:00 am

The Lowe-Down

0

James Click

Derek Lowe's four-year agreement with the Dodgers seems well out of line with his recent performance. Will changing coasts be enough to make him a pitcher worth $9 million a year?

Let me be very clear about two of my primary assumptions: First, I think DePodesta is a very smart guy and that he has shown a tendency to be very bold in his short tenure as GM of the Dodgers; second, I don't think he's lost his mind.

The reasons people have found the Lowe contract so horrendously out of line with DePodesta are 1.) both its length and its amount, and 2.) the fact that it's being spent on a pitcher who hasn't just been trending downward, he's been spiraling. Given DePodesta's pedigree in Oakland and his willingness to trade players whose best qualities - according to the media - are intangibles, committing that much time and money to a player who has one - count them, one - good season as a starting pitcher on his resume and a few well timed outs in the post-season appears drastically out of line. Thus the conclusion that either DePodesta has lost his mind or he knows something that the rest of us don't. Since I'm assuming the Dodger GM is quite sane, I'd like to know what he was thinking.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 9, 2004 12:00 am

Time to Get PADE Again

0

James Click

An improved version of last winter's attempt to adjust Defensive Efficiency for park effects yields some interesting results.

Now that baseball’s coaches and managers have weighed in on their favorite defensive players, and Clay Davenport has unveiled his champion glovemen of 2004, I though I’d bring back an old friend for a fresh look at this year’s defensive performances.

Last year, I introduced some changes to Bill James’ Defensive Efficiency, a metric that measures the percentage of balls in play that the defense converts into outs. While it eventually ended in a measure intended to be free of both park and pitching factors called Team Adjusted Defense (TAD), I’m uncomfortable with the process of removing pitching from the operation, so for now I’ll stick to the original update: Park Adjusted Defensive Efficiency (PADE).

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 16, 2004 12:00 am

How Parks Affect Baserunning

0

James Click

Baseball teams show a consistent home-field advantage each season, with homer teams playing about .540 ball. Is that edge due to home teams doing a better job of taking the extra base thanks to familiarity with their environment? James Click breaks it down.

The source of this advantage is unknown. It's been suggested that local knowledge, how to hit or pitch better in a team's more familiar home park, is the key. Perhaps some of the home team's advantage lies in knowing the nuances of their particular ballpark, but applied in a different area. It's possible that home teams may be better baserunners, knowing better than their opponents which balls will allow them to take the extra base.

Before getting into whether or not a baserunning advantage is the result of a particular park, it's important to first establish that parks do affect the baserunning in a consistent manner from year to year. To determine if park factors for baserunning do exist, I'll look at three typical baserunning situations where the runner is faced with the choice to take the extra base or not: a runner on first during a single, a runner on first during a double, and a runner on second during a single. There are three possible outcomes to each baserunning event: the runner can take the base he's supposed to, the runner can take the extra base or the runner can be thrown out.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

July 30, 2004 12:00 am

Park Factor Review

0

Clay Davenport

Now that we've gotten to the 100-game mark on the season, I decided to take a look at how the park factors were shaking out so far in '04. Park factors are noisy pieces of data--that's the reason why we use three-year averages in the first place--and I expect that some of these 100-game factors will change significantly between now and the end of the season. That caveat aside, let's take a look at how pro baseball's parks--from the majors down to A-ball--are playing.

That caveat aside, let's take a look at how pro baseball's parks--from the majors down to A-ball--are playing.

The New Parks

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>