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Articles Tagged Park Factors 

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05-28

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9

Skewed Left: The Real Future Yankees
by
Zachary Levine

12-21

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10

BP Unfiltered: The Philosophy of Park Factors
by
Colin Wyers

05-11

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1

The Stats Go Marching In: All About Velocity
by
Max Marchi

09-22

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4

Manufactured Runs: A Walk in the Park
by
Colin Wyers

06-23

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1

Manufactured Runs: Batted Balls
by
Colin Wyers

10-06

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6

Playoff Prospectus: Post-Season Ballparks
by
Clay Davenport

09-07

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3

Ahead in the Count: Home-Field Advantage, Part Five
by
Matt Swartz

05-24

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80

Prospectus Idol Entry: Baseball Prospectus Basics: Park Factors
by
Brian Cartwright

01-31

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Back to the Drawing Board
by
Dan Fox

12-20

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Issue of the Day, and Ranging into the Outfield
by
Dan Fox

10-23

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0

Prospectus Toolbox: A Tale of Two Ballparks
by
Derek Jacques

08-03

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Advancing in Context
by
Dan Fox

08-03

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0

Prospectus Today: Something's Rotten in Den...ver
by
Joe Sheehan

11-16

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0

Can Of Corn: The Case for Pettitte
by
Dayn Perry

11-03

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0

Crooked Numbers: Homeland Defense
by
James Click

07-26

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0

Can Of Corn: Putting the Park Back in Park Factors
by
Dayn Perry

03-10

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0

Crooked Numbers: The Only Constant Is Change
by
James Click

03-07

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0

Fantasy Focus: Fantasy Feng-Shui
by
Erik Siegrist

02-10

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0

Crooked Numbers: More Time in the Park
by
James Click

02-03

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0

Crooked Numbers: Park Effects on Pitcher Types
by
James Click

01-12

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0

The Lowe-Down
by
James Click

11-09

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0

Time to Get PADE Again
by
James Click

08-16

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0

How Parks Affect Baserunning
by
James Click

07-30

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0

Park Factor Review
by
Clay Davenport

04-20

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0

Looking Ahead
by
Boyd Nation

10-27

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0

A TAD Here or There
by
James Click

10-09

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2

Getting PADE
by
James Click

06-17

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0

Rockies' #634
by
Boyd Nation

04-11

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0

Breaking Balls: Environmental Control
by
Derek Zumsteg

08-14

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The Daily Prospectus: Park Effects
by
Joe Sheehan

04-18

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The Daily Prospectus: Even More on Park Factors
by
Joe Sheehan

03-05

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0

Lost in America
by
Keith Scherer

02-14

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0

What's That Park Like?
by
Rich Rifkin

09-15

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A Quick and Dirty Guide to 1998 Park Factors
by
Greg Spira

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May 28, 2013 5:00 am

Skewed Left: The Real Future Yankees

9

Zachary Levine

Why the players who are destined to be Yankees aren't the ones they once were.

Bryce Harper made his major league debut on April 28, 2012. It took 11 days for someone not only to project his future as a New York Yankee but also to put an outrageous salary number on it. Thirty-seven days later, ESPN wondered in its Yankees coverage about Harper’s future in pinstripes.

It’s a bit of an industry, making projections on who’s going to be a New York Yankee. Felix Hernandez was a future Yankee forever until the Mariners made sure that he wasn’t. Just this week, that infamous Royals graphic placed Mike Trout on the Yankees already. And the terrific New York Daily News-er and 80-grade Internet troll Andy Martino gave his Mets followers a little “FY” treatment regarding Matt Harvey.

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Why we don't use component park factors in TAv.

There was some chatter on Twitter this morning about park factors, and Marc Normandin made the point that all of the most common park-adjusted offensive stats out there (TAv, OPS+, wRC+) use "generic" run-based park factors, not component park factors. (Baseball Prospectus does have component park factors which we use in PECOTA, and we use those to generate our run-based park factors, but we use run-based park factors in TAv.) Marc wondered if using one-size-fits-all rather than the component factors might lead to inaccuracies—after all, we know different parks affect different types of hitters in different ways, and our park adjustment methods here don't account for that. (Marc isn't the first to raise this point, by the way.) So why do we all do it this way?

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Max examines all the factors that influence pitch velocity, lays out his simple and complex approaches to making PITCHf/x information more accurate, and determines how hard the Nationals are really throwing.

Cooling off the radar guns
No more calling Strasburg's 91 mph pitch a 'changeup'. It's disheartening to like 98% of the rest of us for whom 91 is a 'fastball'.—@BMcCarthy32

Everyone likes looking at radar guns.


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A new way of adjusting for a player's environment.

One of the fascinating things for baseball fans is the differences between ballparks--the role that the very park itself plays in baseball is probably unique in sports.  Different ballparks bring a very different character to the proceedings, and of course, they can even change the course of the events on the field.

It doesn’t help that MLB’s rules on the subject can be remarkably vague on the subject--at one point it states that “[a] distance of 320 feet or more along the foul lines, and 400 feet or more to center field is preferable,” which does little to indicate what might be allowed. This, of course, gives great latitude to ballpark designers, and they’ve taken advantage of that latitude.

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Park adjustments show than line-drive and fly-ball rates can be affected by the scorers.

Let’s talk about batted balls.

I’m sure we’re all familiar with the category labels that we use to describe batted balls—ground balls, line drives, fly balls, and popups. Precise definitions vary, but David Cortesi gives a succinct set of criteria:

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October 6, 2009 11:27 am

Playoff Prospectus: Post-Season Ballparks

6

Clay Davenport

Which teams and which players will get the least and most benefit of the few venues in play for October baseball?

A park factor, as used here, is a measure of how a team's home field changes their statistics. It results from a combination of many factors-the distance and height of the outfield fences, angles, foul territory, visibility, field surface, and weather, to name a few. It is not the case that the Yankees have a high park factor for home runs (PF) because the Yankees hit a lot of home runs. To get a high PF, you need to hit and allow more home runs in your home games than you do in your road games. An average effect on HR is written as '100'; a better-than-average park will score something like 120, which means they get a boost 20 percent above average, while a poor hitters' park would score 90, or 10 percent below average. Players are also graded on who has the best and worst fit to their stadium-not on how well they hit home/road, but how well their profile matches or doesn't match what the park gives.

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September 7, 2009 12:43 pm

Ahead in the Count: Home-Field Advantage, Part Five

3

Matt Swartz

Wrapping up the review of home-field advantages to see if there's anything extra we might be missing.

This is the fifth and final article in this series on home-field advantage. The first four parts of this series have revealed many things. In the first article of this series, we studied what home teams are able to do more frequently than road teams; we learned that they pretty much do everything better, hitting more home runs, reaching base more frequently on balls in play, walking more often, striking out less often, stealing more bases, making fewer errors, and recording more complete-game shutouts. In the second article, we learned that nearly all home teams enjoy relatively similar home-field advantages over time, with the exception of the Rockies, and that the vast majority of year-to-year fluctuations in teams' home-field advantages are random fluctuation. The third time around demonstrated the important role of distance and familiarity in determining home-field advantage, and noted that home-field advantage was much larger in interdivision games than intradivision games, and was especially large in interleague games. We discovered something quirky in the fourth article of this series, that not only was the first game of the series not any more likely to exhibit home-field advantage, but the penultimate game was. More peculiarly, it was statistically significant, indicating that it is not all that likely to be merely noise. I received many e-mails and comments suggesting reasons that this peculiar effect may be real, or expressing skepticism that it is more than merely noise. This indicates that there is probably more to be learned about home-field advantage, and more that is not immediately obvious.

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The new Yankeee Stadium has received a lot of press this spring for the large number of homeruns hit there so far. On April 21, 2009, Buster Olney wrote at ESPN http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=4080195 "The New York Yankees might have a serious problem on their hands: Beautiful new Yankee Stadium appears to be a veritable wind tunnel that is rocketing balls over the fences...including 17 in the first three games in the Yankees' first home series against the Indians. That's an average of five home runs per game and, at this pace, there would be about 400 homers hit in the park this year -- or an increase of about 250 percent. In the last year of old Yankee Stadium, in 2008, there were a total of 160 homers."

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January 31, 2008 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Back to the Drawing Board

0

Dan Fox

With a nod to the wisdom of crowds, Dan revisits Simple Fielding Runs and outfield defense.

"I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work."
--Thomas A. Edison


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December 20, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: The Issue of the Day, and Ranging into the Outfield

0

Dan Fox

Before moving on to assessing outfielders through SFR, some thoughts on the import of Senator Mitchell's findings.

"Athletes who are chemically propelled to victory do not merely overvalue winning, they misunderstand why winning is properly valued."
George Will, "Barry Bonds' Enhancement," Newsweek, May 21, 2007


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Skip nature versus nurture, let's talk environments and outcomes.

Lots of people are excited to see the Colorado Rockies in the World Series, but statheads are probably watching this series with a special glint of joy in their eyes. You see, for the past fifteen years, the Rockies have been the focus of one of the great inquiries in baseball-how do you win at altitude? Performance analysis can be defined as the study of baseball in context, and since 1993, the city of Denver has given the major leagues one of the most fascinating contexts in its history: a relentless high-run environment.

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August 3, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Advancing in Context

0

Dan Fox

Dan continues his series analyzing baserunner advancement by taking park factors under consideration.

--Ken Griffey Jr.

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