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Happy Thanksgiving! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 1

Articles Tagged PED 

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02-26

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33

Baseball ProGUESTus: Surviving Professional Baseball in the Steroid Era
by
Eric Knott

01-30

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 129: Why the Latest Steroids Scandal Isn't That Scandalous/2013 Season Preview Series: Tampa Bay Rays
by
Ben Lindbergh, Sam Miller and Pete Barrett

01-10

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14

Baseball Therapy: Lessons from the Hall of Fame Vote
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-12

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7

Pebble Hunting: How Many MVP Votes Will Ryan Braun Lose?
by
Sam Miller

10-14

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6

Playoff Prospectus: Why We Won't See Melky Cabrera in the NLCS
by
Mike Ferrin

08-29

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9

The Lineup Card: 7 Memorable Suspensions, Bans, and Blackball Cases
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-16

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4

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 22: Why BP Didn't Break the Melky Cabrera Suspension
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-15

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24

BP Unfiltered: Melky Cabrera, PEDs, and the Giants' Playoff Odds
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-25

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13

Sobsequy: Ramirez and Rameau
by
Adam Sobsey

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-12

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107

Prospectus Hit and Run: Braun Banned for PEDs [Version 9]
by
Jay Jaffe

02-18

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Never a Dull Moment with Gary Sheffield
by
Jay Jaffe

01-13

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Trevor Hoffman and the Coming Wave
by
Jay Jaffe

01-06

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28

Prospectus Hit and Run: Blyleven in '11 and Other Tales from the Ballot
by
Jay Jaffe

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

02-09

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139

Prospectus Today: Stupid Media Tricks
by
Joe Sheehan

05-13

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0

Prospectus Today: Chillin' in the American League
by
William Burke and Joe Sheehan

01-29

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0

Stupid Lawyer Tricks
by
Derek Jacques

01-25

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0

Prospectus Hit and Run: PEDs and Discontent
by
Jay Jaffe

12-14

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0

Prospectus Today: The Morning After
by
Joe Sheehan

05-22

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0

Prospectus Today: Break with the Past
by
Joe Sheehan

09-28

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0

Three Strikes and You're...Given a Fourth Strike
by
Thomas Gorman

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The current career saves leader has left the building and ought to head to Cooperstown, but who else deserves to join him?

No sooner had Trevor Hoffman announced his retirement on Tuesday than the questions as to his Hall of Fame worthiness came into the conversation. With only five relievers already enshrined in Cooperstown, the ranks of the elected would appear to have plenty of room for the all-time saves leader, but then the same thing might have been said about Lee Smith a few years ago, and he has yet to crack the 50 percent threshold in his nine years on the ballot.

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Two men finally get their due in Cooperstown, while several other qualified players are locked out.

Our long national nightmare is over. On Wednesday at 2 p.m., the National Baseball Hall of Fame opened its doors to Roberto Alomar and Bert Blyleven, two overwhelmingly qualified candidates who missed gaining entry from the BBWAA last year by a combined 13 votes. Both cleared the mandatory 75 percent threshold with room to spare, with Alomar drawing 90 percent of the record 581 votes cast during his second year on the ballot, and Blyleven garnering 79.7 percent in his 14th year of eligibility. They'll join Pat Gillick on the dais in Cooperstown, New York on July 24.

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A look at the first basemen on this year's Hall of Fame ballot.

Having kicked off this year's JAWS series with the starting pitchers, today we turn our attention to the first basemen, a slate which includes the ballot's best newcomer as well as its most controversial first-timer, and a few holdovers who aren't going anywhere for entirely different reasons.

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Shrieking over A-Rod revisits not just the question of PED use, it brings us back to the multitude of abuses related to the issue.

And so it continues. Per Selena Roberts and David Epstein of Sports Illustrated, Alex Rodriguez was one of 104 players to test positive for performance-enhancing drugs in 2003. In that year, every player in Major League Baseball was tested, presumably anonymously, in an effort to learn the depth of the PED problem in baseball and weigh the need for a program that would mix random testing with penalties for use.

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Offense is down in the league with the DH, but by how much, and why?

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January 29, 2008 12:00 am

Stupid Lawyer Tricks

0

Derek Jacques

Bonds does the obvious, Big Brother takes the latest round on the subject of seizures, and the Rocketmen draw a fuzzy picture.

Barry Bonds Moves to Dismiss Indictment

You might have read that the all-time home run leader filed a motion last week before the federal court in the Northern District of California, asking that the perjury and obstruction of justice charges against him be dismissed based on the "unconstitutional vagueness" of the indictment. This story's a little confusing, since it looks like it should either be considered a much bigger deal than it is, or ignored completely.

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How do the latest controversies affect one man's take on Hall of Fame voting, now and into the future?

A couple weeks back, in the aftermath of the 2008 Hall of Fame voting, I mentioned to readers that I had rant in store about the Hall of Fame vote and performance-enhancing drugs. Since then, I've waffled between my desire to write said rant and a competing desire to skip the middle man and simply take a Louisville Slugger to my own noggin. The baseball world hardly lacks for articles about steroids these days, and the next Hall of Fame vote drive doesn't kick off for another 10 months. Why go there, particularly when the topic is no damn fun to wallow in?

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December 14, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The Morning After

0

Joe Sheehan

The Mitchell Report hangover might make some people's heads hurt, but not for the reasons you may think.

When you come down to it, George Mitchell is most appropriately described as a bad free agent signing by the industry, Park Avenue's answer to Francisco Cordero or Gary Matthews Jr.

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It's time for baseball to stop hurting itself, to recognize the progress made, and to move on.

Jason Giambi placed himself at the center of a controversy last week, claiming that MLB should issue an apology as an industry for players' use of performance-enhancing drugs in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Giambi, who testified under oath during the BALCO investigation that he himself used steroids, acknowledged his use in his comments to USA Today but claimed that they didn't help his performance.

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September 28, 2005 12:00 am

Three Strikes and You're...Given a Fourth Strike

0

Thomas Gorman

The Players Association finally responded to Commissioner Selig's proposed testing program. Tom Gorman takes a look at the fine print.

The Commissioner's proposal was made in a publicly-released April 25th letter to Don Fehr. In that letter Selig suggested five substantive changes to the current Joint Drug Agreement (hereafter called the Agreement for brevity's sake), agreed to in January of 2005.

  1. The Commissioner proposed that punishments increase to 50 games, 100 games, and a lifetime ban for first, second and third offenses from the previous schedule of 10 games, 30 games, 60 games, and one year for first, second, third, and fourth offenses.

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