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Articles Tagged One-hitter 

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06-19

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24

Fantasy Beat: The Magnificence of R.A. Dickey
by
Jason Collette

04-19

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6

Research Mailbag: James McDonald, Professional Hitter
by
Bradley Ankrom

02-29

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12

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

12-21

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36

Spinning Yarn: Hit-and-Run Success is No Accident
by
Mike Fast

12-16

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Men Behind the Men Behind the Plate
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

11-18

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15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Why Having a Quick Hook Helps
by
Mitchel Lichtman

10-31

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33

World Series Prospectus: A Card Fought Win
by
Jay Jaffe

10-28

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54

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-13

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57

Doctoring The Numbers: Starting Them Young, Part One
by
Rany Jazayerli

09-14

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47

The Lineup Card: Commissioner for a Day
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-13

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48

The Lineup Card: Cult Favorites: 18 Non-Star Ballplayers Who Should be Better Remembered
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-24

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answers from a Sabermetrician, Part 1
by
Tom Tango

05-19

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball in 1864
by
Clay Davenport

05-17

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22

Future Shock: Who's No. 1?
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-10

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12

Manufactured Runs: The Deconstruction of Falling Stars
by
Colin Wyers

02-24

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3

Purpose Pitches: NL NRIs of Note
by
Christina Kahrl

02-16

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38

Future Shock: Minnesota Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-16

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6

Purpose Pitches: AL NRIs to Watch
by
Christina Kahrl

01-31

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Bill Monbouquette, Part One
by
David Laurila

12-30

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9

Transaction Analysis: NL West Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

12-22

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57

Future Shock: New York Mets Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-02

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Jimmy Wynn
by
David Laurila

11-19

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7

On the Beat: The AL Winter Agenda
by
John Perrotto

11-19

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62

Future Shock: Kansas City Royals Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-12

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Lyle Overbay
by
David Laurila

10-14

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17

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Preview: Rangers vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

08-01

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9

Transaction Analysis: Deadline Day Outcomes in the NL
by
Christina Kahrl and Kevin Goldstein

07-20

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13

Prospectus Q&A: C.J. Wilson
by
David Laurila

06-15

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2

Future Shock: Draft Wrap: NL Central
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-11

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9

Future Shock: Draft Wrap: AL East
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-01

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2

Another Look: A Six Pack of No-Hitters
by
Bob Hertzel

04-04

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
David Laurila

04-02

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11

Checking the Numbers: SHINO-myte!
by
Eric Seidman

03-23

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26

Ahead in the Count: Predicting BABIP, Part 1
by
Matt Swartz

03-22

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28

Baseball Therapy: There Goes My Hero
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-08

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48

Baseball Therapy: Going Streaking
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-07

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Chaz Scoggins
by
David Laurila

01-26

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10

You Could Look It Up: The Statheads vs. Blondy Ryan
by
Steven Goldman

01-19

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38

Future Shock: Diamondbacks Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-13

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77

Prospectus Hit and Run: 10 Men Out
by
Jay Jaffe

01-10

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19

Prospectus Roundtable: BABIP and Line Drives
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-23

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14

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases at Third and Short
by
Jay Jaffe

12-04

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25

Transaction Action: The Fox and the Walking Man
by
Christina Kahrl

11-23

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24

Prospectus Today: Outfield and Catcher Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

11-22

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23

Prospectus Today: Infield Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

10-28

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25

World Series Prospectus: Yankees versus Phillies Preview
by
Jay Jaffe

10-22

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9

Checking the Numbers: Crossing Over
by
Eric Seidman

10-14

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42

Prospectus Today: A Triple Play of Division Series Post Mortems
by
Joe Sheehan

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A look at Dickey's incredible run.

He went for $2 in the Tout Wars Mixed.  He went for $5 in Tout Wars NL draft while going for $4 in LABR NL (purchased by Derek Carty in both instances). Yet, there is no hotter fantasy baseball asset in leagues right now than R.A. Dickey, who currently stands 11-1 with a 2.00 ERA, 103 strikeouts, and just 21 walks in 99 innings of work. Those are the kind of numbers people pay $24 to roster Cole Hamels for, yet Dickey owners are getting it for a 75 percent discount amidst arguably the best story going in baseball today. Dickey’s last six starts encompass 48 2/3 innings of work in which he has allowed just 21 hits, one earned run, five walks, and 63 strikeouts. Those are not even Hamels-like numbers; those are more like Koufax numbers.

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April 19, 2012 3:00 am

Research Mailbag: James McDonald, Professional Hitter

6

Bradley Ankrom

This week's mailbag takes a look at Hall of Famers who were picked in later rounds of the draft, home team winning percentage in extra innings, and Matt Cain's one-hitter.

Welcome to the latest installment of the Baseball Prospectus Research Mailbag. This week, we’ll tackle Hall of Famers being selected in later rounds of the draft, the home team’s winning percentage in extra-inning contests, and the quirks of Matt Cain’s one-hitter against the Pirates last Friday. As always, if there’s a question you would like to see answered in a future mailbag, please feel free to send it in via email or through the “Contact Author” form (please remember to include your full name and hometown with your question).

George Brett and Mike Schmidt went back-to-back with the 29th and 30th picks of the 1971 draft. Have there been any other cases of two Hall of Famers being picked back-to-back in the draft? Also, what’s the latest a Hall of Fame player has gone in the draft?

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February 29, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview

12

Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

The two Jasons dissect the pressing questions facing the Rangers, Angels, A's, and Mariners this season.

PECOTA Team Projections
Record: 89-73
Team WARP: 45.7
Runs Scored: 719
Runs Allowed: 648​
Team FRAA: 37.6






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The hit-and-run is much maligned as a small-ball tactic, but it's a surprisingly successful strategy.

In this game you never know enough.”—Dale Mitchell

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What can Jeff Mathis and Mike Napoli tell us about the dangers of valuing backup catchers inappropriately?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jonathan Bernhardt is a freelance writer born in Baltimore who lives and works in New York City. He is an occasional contributor to the Et tu, Mr. Destructo? blog.

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You might not know it from watching the World Series, but it often makes sense for a manager to pinch hit for his starter before the late innings.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Mitchel Lichtman, or MGL, has been doing sabermetric research and writing for over 20 years. He is one of the authors of The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball, and co-hosts The Book blog, www.insidethebook.com. He consulted for the St. Louis Cardinals from 2004 to 2006, as well as other major-league teams. He holds a B.A. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of Nevada Boyd School of Law. Most of the time these days you can find him on the golf course.


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While anticlimactic after Game Six, the final game of the World Series capped off one of the most exciting postseasons in recent memory

That Game Seven of the 2011 World Series couldn't match the drama of Game Six was almost a given even before the first pitch was thrown. We don't talk about the finales of the 1975 or 1986 World Series in the same reverential tones as we do their penultimate contests, great though they may have been on their own merits. So unsurprisingly, we were not treated to a Jack Morris-level performance or an extra-inning walk-off win to complete the neat historical parallel provided by the Buck family’s "We'll see you tomorrow night!" calls following game-winning homers. Nonetheless, the first Game Seven in nine years required one more come-from-behind effort—down 2-0 before their starter had retired a single hitter—as well as heroics from some familiar names for the Cardinals to complete one of the most unlikely comebacks in baseball history en route to winning their 11th world championship via a 6-2 win over the Rangers.

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October 28, 2011 10:37 am

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling

54

Jay Jaffe

If you tuned out when the Rangers led 7-5 in the ninth, you missed quite a finish

It was the best worst World Series game—or perhaps the worst best World Series game—I've ever seen. Four and a half hours, 11 innings, 42 players, 19 runs, 23 men left on base, six home runs, five errors, two final-strike comebacks, a handful of bad relief performances, some managerial howlers including a cardinal (not Cardinal) sin… and it all ended with the much-maligned Joe Buck giving a fitting nod to history by emulating one of his father's most famous calls. As David Freese's game-winning blast landed in the grass beyond the center field wall of Busch Stadium, Buck exclaimed, "We'll see you tomorrow night!" Game Six of the 2011 World Series will be remembered as a classic—a Game Six that can sit alongside those of 1975, 1986, and 1991, among maybe a couple others—as the Cardinals staved off elimination to beat the Rangers 10-9, forcing a Game Seven.

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Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

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One of BP's co-founders returns to reveal an important amateur draft inefficiency.

Everyone missed on Mike Trout. Don’t get me wrong: Trout was a well-regarded player headed into the 2009 draft, a certain first-round talent. But he wasn’t—yet—a phenom. Everyone liked Trout; it’s just that no one loved him. Baseball America ranked him as the 22nd-best player in the draft. No one doubted his athleticism or his work ethic; a lot of people doubted the level of competition he faced as a high school player from rural New Jersey. The Angels drafted him with the 25th pick overall, and they’ll tell you today that they knew he was destined to be a special player. What they won’t tell you is that they had back-to-back picks at #24 and #25, and they announced Randal Grichuk’s name first.

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What would the BP team do if they were appointed commissioner for a day?

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In the first in a new series of weekly lists, the BP team compiles its nominees for most under-appreciated ballplayers of their times.

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