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Which systems amongst the Senior Circuit are making progress, and which are sliding? At the midway mark, Kevin has updates on what's going on.

Continuing from Friday's piece, we move on to the prospects of the prospects in the National League.

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July 6, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: Risers and Fallers, American League

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Kevin Goldstein

Which systems are making progress, and which are sliding? At the midway mark, Kevin has updates on what's going on down on the farm.

As we approach the All-Star break, now is a good time to assess where each team's minor league system stands. With the shorter season, we're a little bit past the halfway mark. Here's who is moving up, moving down, and maybe moving into the No. 1 position when I compile each team's Top 10 Prospects in the offseason. Today, we start with the American League.

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September 14, 2006 12:00 am

You Could Look It Up: No Hitters Ain't That Special, Part Two

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Steven Goldman

Steven continues his historical look at no-hitters by journeying from the 1940s through the 1960s, which includes the Age of the Pitcher.

1940-1950 (12)
There were no no-hitters between August 30, 1941 (Lon Warneke for the St. Louis Cardinals against Cincinnati) and April 27, 1944 (Jim Tobin for the Boston Braves against Brooklyn). Perhaps it was the softer wartime ball (the rubber core was sacrificed to the military) that brought back the no-no, but there were actually fewer than you might think given how far offense declined. From 1937-1941, the two leagues slugged .392 and had a .340 on-base percentage. From 1942-1945 those figures dropped to .352 and .325, respectively.

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September 8, 2006 12:00 am

You Could Look It Up: No Hits For You

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Steven Goldman

Anibal Sanchez's no-hitter prompts Steven to look through baseball's archives to find the others. Today: 1900-1940.

Sanchez's no-hitter broke a long drought in the no-hit department. Much was made of this, though the drought itself wasn't particularly special. When the ball got rabbit feet in the 1920s and 30s, no-hitters became an endangered species. No-nos by decade, including perfect games, 1900-present, with assorted observations:

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ANAHEIM ANGELS Placed RHP Al Levine on the 15-day DL (shoulder tendinitis), retroactive to 6/27; recalled RHP John Lackey from Salt Lake. [6/28] I don't disagree with the idea of bringing up John Lackey to move into the rotation. Lackey is the organization's best upper-level prospect, and he's obviously ready to go.

Recalled RHP Matt Wise from Salt Lake; optioned RHP John Lackey to Salt Lake. [6/25]

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