CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Happy Thanksgiving! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 1

Articles Tagged No-no 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives
<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

After over 50 years without a no-hitter, Johan Santana finally pitched the Mets to a spot in history.

The Weekend Takeaway
Superstitious baseball fans scream or tweet threats at broadcasters who mention that a no-hitter is in progress for fear that the pastime’s overlords won’t let it stand. Apparently, those same overlords read Craig Glaser’s guest article last Tuesday and decided that the curse should work in reverse, too.

Some 80 hours after the article went up on the Baseball Prospectus homepage, Johan Santana took the mound at Citi Field and threw the first of the 134 pitches he would need to do what no Mets hurler had ever done before. He began with an 88-mph fastball to Rafael Furcal and ended with a 79-mph changeup that fooled David Freese. In two hours and 35 minutes, Santana walked five Cardinals and struck out eight, facing 32 batters without surrendering a hit.


Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 20, 2012 3:00 am

The Keeper Reaper: Outfielders for 1/20/12

18

Rob McQuown

Rob answers some comments and discusses Byrd, Presley, Tabata, and Thames.

Welcome to the new Friday time slot, which is kicking off with some (overdue) responses to comments from last week

Following up on Chris Heisey, at present there's no real competition for a starting spot, and unless that changes, he should get about 90 percent of the playing time, which would be almost 600 at-bats, given his low walk rate and where he's likely to bat in the lineup. He hasn't been labeled a "proven veteran" yet, so there's always that chance that he could wash out, but Dusty Baker is loyal to players and sticks to his opinions, so it's more important that Heisey impress his manager in spring training than it is for him to post a 1.5 WARP in the first half.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

October 18, 2011 10:38 am

The Keeper Reaper: Outfielders for 10/18/11

8

Rob McQuown

The Keeper Reaper examines the worthiness of Bruce, Holliday, Span, Revere, Colvin, Blackmon, and Leonys Martin this week

Starting off on a tangent, the Player Forecast Manager has been updated with 2011 final stats, as many have already noted in this blog post: http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=15322. This is good news for discussing keepers. In fact, for easy reference, here are direct links to the PFM reports for the various league sizes used in Keeper Reaper (note that minimum dollars have been set to $5 so that the reports display faster – this can be extended to include players who had worse 2011 seasons, if desired):

Shallow (10-team mixed, 3 keepers): http://pfm.baseballprospectus.com/index.php?cid=6431
Medium (12-team mixed, 5 keepers) http://pfm.baseballprospectus.com/index.php?cid=6430
Deep
(15-team mixed, 6 keepers) http://pfm.baseballprospectus.com/index.php?cid=6432
NL-Only
(12-team NL only, 5 keepers) http://pfm.baseballprospectus.com/index.php?cid=6435
A
L-Only (12-team AL only, 5 keepers) http://pfm.baseballprospectus.com/index.php?cid=6434
Super Deep
(20-team mixed, 10 keepers) http://pfm.baseballprospectus.com/index.php?cid=6433






The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Do early-season phenoms fade once the rest of the league learns to stop giving them pitches to hit?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 30, 2010 8:00 am

Checking the Numbers: A No-No

15

Eric Seidman

Diamondbacks manager A.J. Hinch made the wrong decision in allowing Edwin Jackson to throw 149 pitches during his no-hitter last week.

Evaluating managers from a quantitative standpoint is no small feat. There have certainly been attempts and discussions in the past, but no such framework has ever taken hold of the analytical community and forced its way into our vernacular. It can be easy to suggest that the job consists of little more than penciling names onto a card to hand the umpires or lift tired starting pitchers to insert more effective relievers. These are areas that could potentially be quantified, but they're not the sole responsibilities of a skipper. Even so, sometimes the second of those two aspects of managing can become tricky and less clear-cut.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

BP's in-house guru takes his shot at projecting how team's top picks go next week.

1. Washington Nationals: This is now a no-brainer. Over the course of the spring, we've slowly gone from "Will they take Harper?" to "Will they sign Haper?" to "How much will they pay Harper?" He's going No. 1, and you could even end up seeing a creative deal that, on paper, gets him more than Stephen Strasburg received.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 1, 2010 8:30 am

Another Look: A Six Pack of No-Hitters

2

Bob Hertzel

Our resident veteran scribe has covered six no-nos in his career and all have had interesting back stories.

Sometimes, the wheel of fortune just seems to keep stopping on your number. Or not. For example, think of Marty Noble, the fine veteran baseball writer who covers the New York Mets these days for MLB.com and who spent years as that team’s beat writer at Newsday. The man has been covering baseball games since he weighed 180 pounds, and one look will tell you that was a long, long time ago. He's covered it all—except a no-hitter. It’s probably safe to say there are lot of veteran baseball writers who have not covered a no-hitter. That’s their loss, for there really is nothing quite like a no-hitter to cover. That was a lesson learned early in a baseball writing career. Real early.

In 1969, I took over the baseball beat at the Cincinnati Enquirer, not knowing what lay ahead, which was, of course, the birth of the Big Red Machine. But that was a year away and there was no way to know that I would cover six no-hitters or that they would come at me before I was ready for them.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

May 24, 2010 8:59 am

Campus Notes: Conference Tournament Time

5

Charles Dahan

SEC, ACC, Big 12 and Big East tourneys will decide national seeds and at-large berth for the NCAAs.

The regular season concluded Sunday in the SEC, ACC, Big East, and Big 12 with their conference tournaments beginning Wednesday.  While the weekend's results arguably moved Florida into the upper echelon of the nation's dominant teams- alongside Arizona State, Texas, and Virginia-after the Gators took two of three from South Carolina, the nation's hottest team, four national seeds as well as up to eight regional hosts could be determined during conference tournament play. 

Here is a look at how the conference tourneys stack up:

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 3, 2008 12:00 am

Every Given Sunday: Deadline Day Afters

0

John Perrotto

Dread reduction in LA, Ichiro really does have 3,000 hits, plus rumblings and news from around the leagues.

There has rarely, if ever, been a more active July when it comes to trading. The Indians began the flurry of activity before the July 31 deadline by shipping left-hander and reigning American League Cy Young Award-winner CC Sabathia to the Brewers on July 7 for a package of four prospects. The Athletics sent Rich Harden to the Cubs a day later, and before the month was over other notable names such as Joe Blanton, Ray Durham, Randy Wolf, Jon Rauch, Xavier Nady, Casey Blake, Mark Teixeira, and Ivan Rodriguez were on the move.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

August 19, 2007 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Slotto Bonanzas, Part Two

0

Nate Silver

Nate turns his attention to the individual big bonus players from the last decade, and determines whether their teams would do it all over again.

What follows is a comprehensive roster of all players between 1998 and 2006 who were drafted with one of the first 100 selections and who also went for at least $500,000 over slot, considering both their signing bonus and any guaranteed MLB money. I've used the 2006 slot values for all seasons from 2000-2006, as MLB has generally been very successful at containing draft inflation during this period (in fact, the draft slots went down in 2007). The slots do appear to have been a little lower in 1999 and 1998, and so I've scaled those back by five percent and 10 percent respectively, rounding off to the nearest "big" number. I've also indicated those cases where the player's alternative careers in football or basketball could have influenced his signing bonus. Finally, I've posed a simple question: If the team had perfect knowledge of what that player was going to do, would they commit the same money again?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Some prospects are up in The Show, some are just up, and some really aren't. Who among our top 100 are headed in which direction?

1. Alex Gordon, 3B, Royals
Eligible Next Year? No
Stock Movement Since Ranking: Unchanged



The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries