CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Happy Holidays! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 29

Articles Tagged Nl East 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

03-24

comment icon

27

Prospectus Preview: NL East 2014 Preseason Preview
by
Sam Miller and Will Woods

08-16

comment icon

6

Overthinking It: Running, But Running Out of Time, in the NL East
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-25

comment icon

12

Transaction Analysis: Hamels Extends Stay in Philly UPDATED
by
Daniel Rathman and R.J. Anderson

07-25

comment icon

31

Transaction Analysis: Hanley Goes to Hollywood UPDATED
by
Colin Wyers, R.J. Anderson and Kevin Goldstein

07-24

comment icon

23

Transaction Analysis: Tigers Shore Up Problem Spots UPDATED
by
R.J. Anderson and Kevin Goldstein

07-24

comment icon

0

Transaction Analysis: Dempster the Brave?
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-03

comment icon

25

What the Contenders Need
by
Bradley Ankrom, Jeff Euston and Kevin Goldstein

05-29

comment icon

3

What You Need to Know: Tuesday, May 29
by
Daniel Rathman

04-12

comment icon

6

What You Need to Know: Thursday, April 12
by
Daniel Rathman

04-05

comment icon

16

On the Beat: The Phillies' Achilles
by
John Perrotto

04-04

comment icon

0

The BP First Take: Wednesday, April 4
by
Daniel Rathman

03-30

comment icon

9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Loose Threads: East Edition
by
Jay Jaffe

07-11

comment icon

6

Divide and Conquer, NL East: Pitching Dominance
by
Michael Jong

03-31

comment icon

42

Pre-Season Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-04

comment icon

12

Ahead in the Count: No Turnover Standings Breakdown
by
Matt Swartz

04-04

comment icon

29

Pre-Season Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-03

comment icon

13

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Lay of the Land
by
Jay Jaffe

04-06

comment icon

28

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-07

comment icon

5

Prospectus Hit and Run: Divisionology
by
Jay Jaffe

04-05

comment icon

0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-07

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Toughest of Them All?
by
Dan Fox

04-02

comment icon

0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-31

comment icon

0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-01

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: In Reverse
by
James Click

04-01

comment icon

0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 11, 2011 9:54 pm

Divide and Conquer, NL East: Pitching Dominance

6

Michael Jong

Michael tests conventional wisdom and examines whether the pitching in the NL East is superior to the Central and West.

In last week's edition of Divide and Conquer, there was some controversy when Derek Lowe's name was brought up among the league leaders in WARP this season. This line of thinking got me examining the WARP totals for all of the division's finest pitchers. Dubious as the Lowe-for-WARP-leader campaign may be, it turns out (rather unsurprisingly) that the NL East as a whole is running out some of the best starting rotations in all of baseball, even when viewed through different lenses.
 

The NL East Starters
Here is how the NL East's five teams stack up in terms of three pitching statistics of interest: ERA, SIERA, and Baseball Prospectus's Fair Run Average (FRA), explained here. The five pitchers who have made the most starts for each team were selected and these are their results:



The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Pegging BP's favorites in both leagues, both in the standings and for the major awards.

Today we reveal the Baseball Prospectus staff predictions for the division standings and the major player awards  (MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year) in the American and National Leagues. Each staff member's division standings predictions may be found later in the article. Here, we present a wisdom-of-the-crowds summary of the results. In each table you'll find the average rank of each team in their division with first-place votes in parentheses, plus the results of our pre-season MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year voting. 

For the MVP voting, we've slightly amended the traditional points system in place that has been used elsewhere, dropping fourth- and fifth-place votes to make it 10-7-5 for the MVP Award, and the regular 5-3-1 for the Cy Young and Rookie of the Year Awards (that's 5 points for a first-place vote, 3 points for a second-place vote, etc.). Next to each of these selections we've listed the total number of ballots, followed by the total number of points, and then the number of first-place votes in parentheses, if any were received.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 4, 2010 9:00 am

Ahead in the Count: No Turnover Standings Breakdown

12

Matt Swartz

Putting every major-league player back with his original team in an alternative universe can tell us a lot about team building.

In March, I introduced The No Turnover Standings which measured what teams’ records would have been if Major League Baseball did not allow any player movement and all players had provided the same production for the team that originally drafted or signed them as amateurs.  As I described in that article:

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Pegging BP's favorites in both leagues, in the standings and for the major awards.

Today we reveal the Baseball Prospectus staff predictions for the division standings and the major player awards (MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year) in the American and National Leagues. Each staff member's division standings predictions may be found later in the article. Here, we present a wisdom-of-the-crowds summary of the results. In each table you'll find the average rank of each team in their division with first-place votes in parentheses, plus the results of our pre-season MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year voting. Picking favorites for the Wild Card for the respective leagues initially might have seemed easy, since the selections universally favored the second-place team in the AL East, while all but two voters picked their second-place teams in the NL East to earn the non-division champ playoff team, but a tie in the rankings had to be broken in favor of the team named the Wild Card winner on the most individual ballots, which is sure to upset some people.

For the MVP voting, we've slightly amended the traditional points system in place that's been used elsewhere, dropping fourth- and fifth-place votes to make it 10-7-5 for the MVP Award, and the regular 5-3-1 for the Cy Young and Rookie of the Year Awards (that's 5 points for a first-place vote, 3 points for a second-place vote, etc.). Next to each of these selections we've listed the total number of ballots, followed by the total number of points, and then the number of first-place votes in parentheses, if any were received.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 3, 2010 11:43 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Lay of the Land

13

Jay Jaffe

From several angles, the AL West could prove to be the best division in baseball.

In preparing a recent column regarding the Dodgers' payroll situation, I made reference to the competitive ecology in which the team competes. "Competitive ecology" is a phrase introduced into the Baseball Prospectus lexicon by Keith Woolner, who wrote about it several times in the context of market-size issues and better revenue-sharing plans. For my money, he summarized it best in a pre-BP post to a Red Sox mailing list that was far ahead of its time:

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 6, 2009 3:36 pm

Preseason Predictions

28

Baseball Prospectus

BP's dirty dozen makes their prognostications to generate the wisdom of at least one small crowd.

Today we reveal the Baseball Prospectus staff predictions for the division standings and the major player awards (MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year) in the American and National Leagues. Each staff member's division standings predictions may be found later in the article. Here, we present a wisdom-of-the-crowds summary of the results. In each table you'll find the average rank of each team in their division with first-place votes in parentheses, plus the results of our pre-season MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year voting. Picking favorites for the Wild Card for the respective leagues initially might have seemed easy, since the selections universally favored the second-place team in the AL East, while all but two voters picked their second-place teams in the NL East to earn the non-division champ playoff team, but a tie in the rankings had to be broken in favor of the team named the Wild Card winner on the most individual ballots, which is sure to upset some people.

For the MVP voting, we've slightly amended the traditional points system in place that's been used elsewhere, dropping fourth- and fifth-place votes to make it 10-7-5 for the MVP Award, and the regular 5-3-1 for the Cy Young and Rookie of the Year Awards (that's 5 points for a first-place vote, 3 points for a second-place vote, etc.). Next to each of these selections we've listed the total number of ballots, followed by the total number of points, and then the number of first-place votes in parentheses, if any were received.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 7, 2008 12:24 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: Divisionology

5

Jay Jaffe

The most powerful and the most hapless divisions of the Wild Card Era.

The World Series is over, and the Rays lost, but from an analytical standpoint, they're a gift that keeps on giving. One much-discussed topic during their post-season run was the strength of the American League East, particularly during the AL Championship Series, where the Rays met and defeated their division foes, the Red Sox. It's no secret that this year's AL East was a particularly deep division in today's smaller-division setup, as its top four teams-the Rays, Red Sox, Yankees, and Blue Jays-finished above .500 and ranked among the top six teams on the year-end Hit List. The question is: Where does this division fit in historically?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

As in the AL, the Central division is as tight as can be, while in the East two Mets are predicted to take home some hardware along with their division flag.

Today we reveal the Baseball Prospectus staff predictions for the division standings and the major player awards (MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year) in the National League, along with the staff picks in some fun miscellaneous categories.

Each staff member's division standings predictions may be found later in the article. Here, we present a wisdom-of-the-crowds summary of the results. In each table you'll find the average rank of each team in their division, plus the results of our pre-season MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year voting.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 7, 2008 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: The Toughest of Them All?

0

Dan Fox

Tweaking a simple projection system, and addressing whether or not the AL Central is really the game's toughest division.

"Never make predictions, especially about the future."
--Casey Stengel


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Full predictions and ballots for the senior circuit, plus who might be on their way to winning it all.

Yesterday we started our predictions miniseries with a look at the American League. Opening Day means that it's time for our National League and World Series picks.

Each author's division standings predictions may be found later in the article. Here, we present a wisdom-of-crowds summary of the results. In each table you'll find the average rank of each team in their division, plus the results of our preseason MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year voting. Coming off of their win on the season's inaugural night, BP likes the Mets to take the NL East again, and sees a three-team horse race in the Central.

Read the full article...

We conclude our predictions with the National League, plus the staff World Series picks.

Yesterday we started our prediction miniseries with a look at the American League. Today we unveil our National League and World Series picks.

Each author's ballot may be found later in the article. Here, we neatly summarize the results. In each division standings table you'll find the average rank of the team, plus the standard deviation. The lower the standard deviation, the more in agreement the authors were about that team's place in the division standings. In our AL column, the Royals had a standard deviation of 0, meaning that all authors agreed they would finish last. And if it weren't for the rebellious, anti-establishment ways of one Keith Woolner, the Cardinals would notch a standard deviation of 0 on the other end of the standings.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 1, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: In Reverse

0

James Click

Our view of the season would be very different if it had played out exactly in reverse to reality. James rewinds the year, and shows us how.

The length of the baseball season can easily obscure some important trends that are developing. Teams like the A's get noticed because their rise from the depths has been so dramatic that it breaks free of the mass of information built before its arrival. But there are may other trends that can easily escape our eyes because so much of the season has already passed.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>