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Articles Tagged New York Yankees 

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07-20

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5

Transaction Analysis: First We Take Manhattan
by
Bryan Grosnick, Greg Goldstein, Steve Givarz, Ryan Schultz, Mike Gianella and George Bissell

07-19

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0

DFA Podcast: Ep. 17: Gotta Start Somewhere
by
Bryan Grosnick, Ben Diamond and Shawn Brody

07-18

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1

Transaction Analysis: Stearns Goes Bargain Shopping
by
Colin Anderle, Aaron Gleeman, Jarrett Seidler and Nicholas Zettel

07-14

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3

Banjo Hitter: Aaron Judge is Out of Control
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-03

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0

Rubbing Mud: Tall Tales
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-01

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2

The Call-Up: Clint Frazier
by
Jarrett Seidler and Wilson Karaman

06-29

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2

The Call-Up: Dustin Fowler
by
Jarrett Seidler and Mike Gianella

06-28

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0

The Call-Up: Tyler Wade
by
Jeffrey Paternostro and Scooter Hotz

06-21

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2

Short Relief: Yank Utilitarianism, A Baseball Board Game Review, and a Song for Ackley
by
Jason Wojciechowski, Matt Ellis and Nathan Bishop

06-19

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2

Rubbing Mud: Arbitrage Artists on Each Coast
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-14

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0

Rubbing Mud: No Free Strikes
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-06

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1

Guarding The Lines: Four Nights In Trenton With Gleyber Torres
by
Jarrett Seidler

05-26

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0

DFA Podcast: Ep. 9: Mullin' Moves
by
Bryan Grosnick, R.J. Anderson and Shawn Brody

05-19

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2

Prospectus Feature: It Finally Clicks for Aaron Hicks
by
David Brown

05-19

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0

Banjo Hitter: Gimme a Quarter's Worth: Rising Odds
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-10

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1

Banjo Hitter: Beyond the 90th Percentile
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-05

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0

DFA Podcast: Ep. 3: Aces Low
by
Bryan Grosnick, R.J. Anderson and Shawn Brody

05-01

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0

Flu-Like Symptoms: Judge-Ment
by
Rob Mains

04-12

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3

Circle Change: What Michael Pineda Can Learn From Off-Brand Michael Pineda
by
Zach Crizer

04-06

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8

Flu-Like Symptoms: Payrolls: It's All Relative
by
Rob Mains

03-31

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4

Short Relief: Famous Cereal Celebrities, Anonymous Roster Cuts, and Illegible Signatures
by
Mary Craig, Matt Sussman and Stacey Gotsulias

03-23

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1

Looking Back on Tomorrow: New York Yankees
by
Jarrett Seidler

02-20

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3

Prospectus Feature: Arbitration Clash
by
Jarrett Seidler

02-20

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0

Deep, But Playable: Didi Gregorius, Power Hitter?
by
Craig Goldstein

02-10

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12

Transaction Analysis: Worst Base?
by
Bryan Grosnick

02-03

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24

Players Prefer Presentation: Here We Are Again
by
Meg Rowley

12-08

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2

Transaction Analysis: 86 For 103
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: Holliday in New York
by
Kenny Ducey

11-25

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4

Two-Strike Approach: The Gary Sanchez Era
by
Cat Garcia

11-18

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5

Transaction Analysis: Astros Building, Yankees Rebuilding
by
Matthew Trueblood, George Bissell and Mauricio Rubio

11-18

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3

Rumor Roundup: Oh Good, a Mike Trout Rumor
by
Demetrius Bell

09-02

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1

Transaction Analysis: Bourn Again
by
Bryan Grosnick and Steve Givarz

08-28

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0

Prospect Profile: James Reeves
by
Jessica Quiroli

08-17

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0

Transaction Analysis: Tigers Add Iglesias Insurance
by
Bryan Grosnick and Christopher Crawford

08-15

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11

Tools of Ignorance: Why Was Chapman So Expensive?
by
Jeff Quinton

08-15

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0

The Call-Up: Aaron Judge
by
Steve Givarz and Mike Gianella

08-08

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0

Prospectus Feature: Does 'Elite Closer' Mean Less Volatility?
by
Henry Druschel

08-06

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0

BP Bronx
by
Evan Davis

08-02

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0

Transaction Analysis: Carlos Beltran's Deadline Deja Vu
by
Kenny Ducey, Christopher Crawford, David Lee, Jarrett Seidler and Ben Carsley

08-01

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0

Transaction Analysis: Andrew Miller Joins the Tribe
by
Bryan Grosnick, Christopher Crawford, Jarrett Seidler, Kenny Ducey and Adam McInturff

07-31

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1

Transaction Analysis: Yankees Reunite With Clippard
by
Kenny Ducey and Steve Givarz

07-28

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3

Banjo Hitter: The Superstar as Washed-Up Hack
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-27

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0

Cold Takes: Stuck With Him
by
Patrick Dubuque

07-27

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0

What You Need to Know: That Summertime Sadness
by
Nicolas Stellini

07-27

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4

Pitching Backward: Valuing Relievers, in July and Otherwise
by
Jeff Long

07-26

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41

Transaction Analysis: Aroldis Chapman Takes The 105 To Wrigley
by
Christopher Crawford, Mike Gianella, Rian Watt, Adam McInturff and Nicolas Stellini

07-25

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0

What You Need to Know: Just For the Record
by
Ashley Varela

07-21

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4

Rubbing Mud: Why the Yankees Should Sell Hard
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-17

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0

BP Bronx
by
Nicolas Stellini

07-17

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6

Rubbing Mud: Another Look At Doyle, Smoltz, Andersen, Bagwell
by
Matthew Trueblood

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New York adds a third baseman and two high-end bullpen arms, and limits Boston's options in the process.

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On the 17th episode of the DFA Podcast, Bryan, special guest Ben Diamond, and Shawn Brody discuss three big deals that are helping shape the 2017 playoff push. The Yankees pick up three pieces, the Nationals grab two, and the Diamondbacks just get one; how did each team do?

It's Baseball Prospectus's newest podcast: DFA! Host Bryan Grosnick (Baseball Prospectus), co-host R.J. Anderson (CBS Sports), and producer Shawn Brody (Beyond the Box Score, BP Mets) are talking about all the transactions and roster moves that make MLB go. From trades and signings to callups and disabled list stints, DFA is here to provide analysis and commentary on all things baseball.

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Milwaukee adds a pair of relievers, New York picks up yet another first baseman, and the international signing bonus slot just can't seem to find a home.

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Judge has flown past his 90th percentile projections and into rarefied air.

Back on May 10, with a little more than one month of the season in the books, I wrote about the seven hitters—five of them big surprises—who had out-produced their 90th percentile PECOTA projections by at least 200 points of OPS. They were—along with the less surprising Bryce Harper and Freddie Freeman duo—Ryan Zimmerman, Eric Thames, Aaron Judge, Yonder Alonso, and Zack Cozart.

A few interesting things have happened to that group since then.

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Aaron Judge and Cody Bellinger are towering over baseball as rookies.

Two of the first half's top stories were the power-hitting pillars of two of the league’s flagship franchises. Aaron Judge and Cody Bellinger have captured the national imagination, and—with the Rookie of the Year trophies almost surely already engraved—they might just capture their league’s MVP awards come November. They’re the perfect new faces for the sport, at least for this part of this season—a spring marked by skyrocketing home run rates, questions about the ball being juiced, and a wave of young talent not only supernally talented, but also impossibly big, strong, and fast.

These are two towering sluggers, but they’re less unusual in that way than they might have been a decade ago, and certainly less so than they would have been in the 1980s or earlier. In fact, the six-foot-seven Judge and the six-foot-four Bellinger are just the latest in a line of very tall power hitters who have been taking over the game in recent seasons. Miguel Sano, Kris Bryant, Corey Seager, and Carlos Correa all are at least six-foot-four. For most of baseball history, conventional wisdom has held that guys with such long levers were too vulnerable strikeouts, too exploitable, too disadvantaged by the larger strike zone with which opposing pitchers could work. That conventional wisdom, to the extent that it’s not retroactively disproven by these superstar sluggers, seems to be eroding. I want to talk about why, and what it can tell us about the game.

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July 1, 2017 6:00 am

The Call-Up: Clint Frazier

2

Jarrett Seidler and Wilson Karaman

The Ginger God has risen.

The Situation: All of the stuff I wrote on Thursday about the Yankees using their vaunted prospect depth to cover position player injuries from Dustin Fowler’s Call-Up is still true. Throw on top of it that Fowler himself tore his patella tendon in his MLB debut, and the Yankees are now firing their last big hitting bullet from the farm, top outfield prospect Clint Frazier.

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June 29, 2017 1:37 pm

The Call-Up: Dustin Fowler

2

Jarrett Seidler and Mike Gianella

The Yankees will have an entirely new team of players by next week, all named Tyler or Dustin or Blake or something.

The Situation: The Yankees are muddling through a cold streak during a season of unexpected contention. With the Super-2 window having passed and injuries creating needs all over the diamond, they’re calling up much of their vaunted upper-level prospect depth. Today’s newest Baby Bomber is versatile and toolsy outfielder Dustin Fowler.

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June 28, 2017 6:00 am

The Call-Up: Tyler Wade

0

Jeffrey Paternostro and Scooter Hotz

The last piece of the Yankees' Tyler Voltron has arrived.

The Situation: Starlin Castro tweaked a hamstring, so the Yankees have called on their swiss army prospect, Tyler Wade, to give them some additional flexibility in the infield.

The Background: The Yankees selected Wade in the fourth round of the 2013 draft as a SoCal prep shortstop, signing him for a little over $370,000. He got a somewhat aggressive assignment to Charleston in his first full pro season, considering he wasn’t a highly-touted prep pick, and both his raw athleticism and his general rawness showed up there. He progressed to Tampa in 2015 and prospect team member Jeff Moore saw a future big leaguer whosecontact skills, left-handed bat and ability to play two up-the-middle positions [gave] him a chance to play a nice role on a big-league roster.” I got eyes on him in 2016 in Trenton and saw much of the same, although I thought his athleticism was starting to show up more in the baseball skills now. He faded a bit down the stretch in Trenton, but overall put together a solid performance for a 21-year-old in Double-A. With the acquisition of Gleyber Torres at the trade deadline, the Yankees sent Wade to the AFL for the second straight season, this time to get some reps in the outfield. This year in Scranton he has played all three outfield positions in addition to shortstop, second, and third. He’s in the midst of a bit of a breakout season, adding a bit of pop to the profile and improving his efficiency on the bases.

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Jason shares the wealth, Matt shares the fate of an old friend, and Nathan reviews Baseball Highlights 2045.

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The lion, the fox, the jackal, and the wolf, with the Yankees starring as the lion.

We talk a lot about the fundamental challenges faced by low-payroll or small-market teams trying to compete with the big boys. This goes back to the times of Branch Rickey and Ed Barrow, but it became a fashionable conversation once Moneyball turned baseball inside-out. The A’s might have been the first team to realize that speed was overvalued and that on-base percentage was undervalued, but the Red Sox and Yankees were among the first five, and that closed Oakland’s margin for error fast.

Ever since, MLB has been reenacting the fable of the lion, the fox, the jackal, and the wolf. See, all four animals went hunting together, and they killed a stag. The lion took his place, and he told the others to quarter the kill. They did, cut it up nice and evenly, and then the lion said, “I get one quarter because I’m king, and another because I’m the arbiter, and another because I took part in the chase. Now, who wants to lay a paw on the last quarter?”

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June 14, 2017 6:00 am

Rubbing Mud: No Free Strikes

0

Matthew Trueblood

Hitters like Miguel Sano, Marcell Ozuna, and Starlin Castro refuse to make things easy on pitchers.

We are, inarguably, living in the Golden Age Of Offensive Platitudes. Russell A. Carleton tossed out several of them in one recent column: “Sit fastball. Swing hard. Strikeouts don’t matter.” The Pirates say “OPS is in the air,” which is really just the Cubs’ “there’s no slug on the ground,” but stood on its head. Josh Donaldson wants you to “just say no to ground balls,” which is unimaginative but clear enough.

Modern offense comes down to launch angle and exit velocity, and to maximizing extra-base power (especially home runs) in order to make up for an unabating upshoot in strikeout rate. To be a great hitter in the modern game is nowhere near easy, but it’s fairly simple. Most teams, and many individual players, have dedicated themselves to breaking down hitting to the simplest set of basic ideas possible, so that batters can adapt to the unprecedented velocity and sheer stuff of modern pitchers as deftly as possible.

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Basically, exactly what the title says.

-1.) Gleyber Torres first enters the back of my consciousness sometime in the spring or summer of 2013. He’s one of the biggest July 2 international free agents of that cycle, and the Cubs are one of the first teams to jump through the loophole in the old July 2 free agency rules and blow far past their international spending cap. The top-rated prospects of that class are Eloy Jimenez and Torres; the Cubs sign them both for seven figures each, plus dozens of others.

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