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Articles Tagged New York Yankees 

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12-08

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2

Transaction Analysis: 86 For 103
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-06

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Transaction Analysis: Holliday in New York
by
Kenny Ducey

11-25

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4

Two-Strike Approach: The Gary Sanchez Era
by
Cat Garcia

11-18

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5

Transaction Analysis: Astros Building, Yankees Rebuilding
by
Matthew Trueblood, George Bissell and Mauricio Rubio

11-18

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3

Rumor Roundup: Oh Good, a Mike Trout Rumor
by
Demetrius Bell

09-02

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1

Transaction Analysis: Bourn Again
by
Bryan Grosnick and Steve Givarz

08-28

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Prospect Profile: James Reeves
by
Jessica Quiroli

08-17

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Transaction Analysis: Tigers Add Iglesias Insurance
by
Bryan Grosnick and Christopher Crawford

08-15

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11

Tools of Ignorance: Why Was Chapman So Expensive?
by
Jeff Quinton

08-15

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The Call-Up: Aaron Judge
by
Steve Givarz and Mike Gianella

08-08

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Prospectus Feature: Does 'Elite Closer' Mean Less Volatility?
by
Henry Druschel

08-06

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BP Bronx
by
Evan Davis

08-02

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Transaction Analysis: Carlos Beltran's Deadline Deja Vu
by
Kenny Ducey, Christopher Crawford, David Lee, Jarrett Seidler and Ben Carsley

08-01

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Transaction Analysis: Andrew Miller Joins the Tribe
by
Bryan Grosnick, Christopher Crawford, Jarrett Seidler, Kenny Ducey and Adam McInturff

07-31

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1

Transaction Analysis: Yankees Reunite With Clippard
by
Kenny Ducey and Steve Givarz

07-28

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3

Banjo Hitter: The Superstar as Washed-Up Hack
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-27

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Cold Takes: Stuck With Him
by
Patrick Dubuque

07-27

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What You Need to Know: That Summertime Sadness
by
Nicolas Stellini

07-27

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4

Pitching Backward: Valuing Relievers, in July and Otherwise
by
Jeff Long

07-26

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41

Transaction Analysis: Aroldis Chapman Takes The 105 To Wrigley
by
Christopher Crawford, Mike Gianella, Rian Watt, Adam McInturff and Nicolas Stellini

07-25

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What You Need to Know: Just For the Record
by
Ashley Varela

07-21

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4

Rubbing Mud: Why the Yankees Should Sell Hard
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-17

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BP Bronx
by
Nicolas Stellini

07-17

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6

Rubbing Mud: Another Look At Doyle, Smoltz, Andersen, Bagwell
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-12

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8

Prospectus Feature: Nothing Slows Rich Teams Except Themselves
by
Henry Druschel

07-10

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BP Bronx
by
Ben Diamond

07-03

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0

BP Bronx
by
Stacey Gotsulias

06-26

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0

BP Bronx
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-25

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0

BP Bronx
by
Nick Ashbourne

06-23

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0

What You Need to Know: Yankees/Rockies 2: The Beltran Rises
by
Demetrius Bell

06-19

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0

BP Bronx
by
Nick Ashbourne

06-18

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0

Raising Aces: The Speed At Which Things Change
by
Doug Thorburn

06-15

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2

What You Need to Know: Don't Ever Get Used to Coors Field
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-13

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1

Transaction Analysis: First Base Merry-Go-Round
by
James Fegan, Christopher Crawford and Bryan Grosnick

06-11

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0

BP Bronx
by
Evan Davis

06-08

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5

Cold Takes: The Stolen Bases Stolen From Us
by
Patrick Dubuque

06-04

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0

BP Bronx
by
Nick Ashbourne

06-01

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3

BP Unfiltered: The Oldest, Worst Baseball Video Game
by
Patrick Dubuque

05-31

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0

Cold Takes: The Milestone Percentage Added
by
Patrick Dubuque

05-29

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0

BP Bronx
by
Nick Ashbourne

05-21

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0

BP Bronx
by
Stacey Gotsulias

05-14

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1

Raising Aces: Why Max Scherzer?
by
Doug Thorburn

05-13

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5

Fifth Column: Wearing It
by
Michael Baumann

05-10

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5

What You Need to Know: Sonny Gray's Short-Lived Mound Shuffle
by
Daniel Rathman

05-06

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1

What You Need to Know: Yankees Find a New Way to Lose
by
Emma Baccellieri

05-05

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0

BP Bronx
by
Ben Diamond

05-02

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5

An Agent's Take: Arizona Surprise
by
Joshua Kusnick

04-29

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20

Fifth Column: The Shift: I Am Girardicus
by
Michael Baumann

03-28

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2

Rumor Roundup: Battle for Fourth Place
by
Ashley Varela

03-02

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13

Players Prefer Presentation: The Chapman Precedent
by
Meg Rowley

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December 8, 2016 1:13 pm

Transaction Analysis: 86 For 103

2

Matthew Trueblood

Aroldis Chapman returns to New York five months after being traded, signing the richest deal ever for a reliever.

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December 6, 2016 1:33 pm

Transaction Analysis: Holliday in New York

0

Kenny Ducey

Matt Holliday is 37, but the Yankees hope the longtime slugger can still beef up the middle of their lineup.

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November 25, 2016 6:00 am

Two-Strike Approach: The Gary Sanchez Era

4

Cat Garcia

In clearing the catcher job for Gary Sanchez the Yankees got good value in return for Brian McCann.

The New York Yankees. They’re 27-time champions, they’re home to some of the greatest names in baseball history, and they’ve been out of the heat of contention for an uncharacteristically long time now.

The Yankees have been lining up pieces for what they hope is a new era of Bronx dominance since they sold off the big parts of their bullpen, Aroldis Chapman and Andrew Miller, in July, leading baseball folks to wonder “what are they up to?” Well, now general manager Brian Cashman is making it clear.

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Houston got to work in a hurry, trading for Brian McCann and signing Josh Reddick and Charlie Morton.

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Mike Trout trade speculation, Boston going after Greg Holland, and Miami bidding on Kenley Jansen.

Red Sox “aggressively” pursuing Holland

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Baltimore goes dumpster diving, Cleveland brings Coco Crisp home, and the Jeff Francoeur tour adds another stop.

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How a lesser known Yankees prospect is helping himself stand out.

James Reeves stepped on the field in Tampa to accept an honor from his current team, the Tampa Yankees. Reeves was named Pitcher of the Month, just a week after holding down the Florida State League honor for Pitcher of the Week.

The day the lefty received the monthly award, he was preparing to take the mound for his 12th start of the 2016. He was upbeat and humorous in the early part of the day, but, later, as the game got closer, he was quieter, an unwavering focus showed on his face as he walked toward his locker. That mix of concentration and lightheartedness has served him well. In June, the Yankees switched the script and decided to make Reeves a full-time starter.

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Erick Aybar isn't what he once was, but he'll work for what the Tigers need and the price was right.

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The Cubs are a well-run organization who, relative to other buyers this summer, seemed to overpay for Aroldis Chapman. Do we need to reframe their choice?

Esteemed colleague and possessor of a terrific first name, Jeff Long, recently wrote about why teams in contention might pay a lot for relievers, even though, as Long writes, “It’s a formula that the sabermetric community sometimes finds difficult to rationalize. Relievers pitch so few innings and are so volatile that their value is almost certainly lower than that of the prospects dealt for them.” As to why teams in contention do this anyway, Long concludes that when the playoffs come teams cannot simply accumulate WARP; they need to actually win individual games, and really good relievers help teams do so. That makes sense to me. It makes sense to me why teams add relievers to improve their chances of winning right now even if they are going to end up accumulating less WARP from a given trade. But what does still does not quite make sense to me is why Aroldis Chapman was so expensive compared to other relievers or other players traded at the deadline.

How expensive was it? Please find an email from me to Chris Crawford, and Crawford’s responding email below:

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His name is Judge.

The Situation: With Alex Rodriguez unconditionally released, the Yankees have room for another bat, and have called upon Aaron Judge (and Tyler Austin) to provide an offensive lift, and audition for a starting role in 2017.

Background: Taken in the 31st round in 2010 out of Linden (CA) HS by Oakland, Judge honored his commitment to Fresno State and in the end it paid off as he was taken 32nd-overall in 2013. Judge put himself on the map following a standout 2012 performance in the Cape, followed by a junior-year campaign where he hit .369/.461/.655 with 12 home runs. Judge has slugged .473 in his minor league career, but has also struck out at a career 24.6 percent rate thus far. The Yankees have taken it slowly thus far with Judge, allowing him to accrue over 650 plate appearances in Triple-A, and nearly 1,300 minor league at-bats in all.

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Does the jump from "good" to "great" make all the difference when it comes to acquiring a closer?

For a number of reasons, the move from this trade deadline that seemed to occupy the biggest portion of our collective consciousness was the Aroldis Chapman trade. He was sent from the Yankees to the Cubs in exchange for Gleyber Torres, Adam Warren, Billy McKinney, and Rashad Crawford. Chapman was suspended earlier this season for violating the league's domestic violence policy, firing a handgun during an argument with his girlfriend and allegedly choking her as well, which meant this trade was accompanied by numerous thorny moral issues. It also happened before the real madness of the 48 hours leading up to the deadline, which meant it had less attention competition for our attention than some of the later trades.

But most relevant to this article, the return seemed huge. Yes, the Cubs are almost definitely going to make the playoffs, and they'll appreciate having a lights-out closer if/when they do, and yes, Torres was almost certainly blocked by other Chicago players, but this still seemed like a high price to pay. Andrew Miller, one of the other elite Yankees relievers, was also traded, and his DRA this season is almost a full run lower than Chapman's. Miller brought back a package of Clint Frazier, Justus Sheffield, Ben Heller, and J.P. Feyereisen, and while I'm not a prospect expert, my sense is the Chapman return is more desirable. It's at least close, which is amazing, because Miller has not only been better than Chapman this year, he's also signed for two years after 2016, at $9 million annually, while Chapman will be a free agent and will probably cost a lot more than Miller over those two years.

What do we do with this? What are we supposed to make of a team like the Cubs, which by all indications is run by very intelligent people, making a decision that looks indefensible? A common reaction (and I think reasonable reaction) is to try to find the assumption that makes the decision look that way, and wonder whether the team might know a reason it's wrong, After the Chapman trade, the most common such argument I saw looked generally like this:

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August 6, 2016 11:23 am

BP Bronx

0

Evan Davis

The Yankees finally waved the white flag, and the reward is already obvious.

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