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Happy Thanksgiving! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 1

Articles Tagged Money 

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12-02

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5

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 339: Alex Rodriguez, Bud Selig, and Hard-Boiled Baseball
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-23

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12

Bizball: 2012 MLB Postseason Shows Money Matters
by
Maury Brown

10-18

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29

Overthinking It: Baseball's Most Immovable Players
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-27

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29

Bizball: The Priciest Trade Ever Made
by
Maury Brown

01-26

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5

Wezen-Ball: Homeless Shelters in Marlins Park?
by
Larry Granillo

01-25

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6

Changing Speeds: The Hall of Famously Weak Arguments, Part 2
by
Ken Funck

01-11

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7

The BP Wayback Machine: The Best Commissioner of All-Time
by
Derek Zumsteg

08-16

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Going Over Slot
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-16

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3

Prospectus Q&A: J.C. Bradbury, Part I
by
David Laurila

08-26

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35

Prospectus Perspective: Acting Like Thieves or Rational Agents?
by
Matt Swartz

04-29

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16

Ahead in the Count: The Source of the AL's Superiority
by
Matt Swartz

04-27

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83

Ahead in the Count: Ryan Howard and the New MORP
by
Matt Swartz

12-06

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25

Prospectus Today: NL Shopping Lists
by
Joe Sheehan

11-17

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32

Ahead in the Count: How To Make Up a Good Trade Rumor
by
Matt Swartz

01-30

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11

Transaction Analysis: NL East Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

07-04

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0

Future Shock: Michel Inoa 101
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-28

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0

Transaction Analysis Special
by
Christina Kahrl

08-30

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0

Transaction of the Day: Contenders' Moves
by
Christina Kahrl

08-20

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Slotto Madness, Part 3
by
Nate Silver

08-19

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Slotto Bonanzas, Part Two
by
Nate Silver

08-17

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Slotto Bonanzas, Part One
by
Nate Silver

08-05

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0

Future Shock: Going Over Slot
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-01

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0

Wait 'Til Next Year: Fight Money
by
Bryan Smith

03-15

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0

Prospectus Today: The Man They Call A-Rod
by
Joe Sheehan

02-12

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0

The Week in Quotes: February 5-12
by
Alex Carnevale

02-10

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0

Transaction Analysis: NL West and NL Catchup
by
Christina Kahrl

11-30

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0

Transaction Analysis: November 22-29, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

11-22

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0

Transaction Analysis: November 17-21
by
Christina Kahrl

03-27

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0

Future Shock: How Do Teams Draft?
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-31

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0

Amazin' Mail
by
Neil deMause

12-02

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0

Prospectus Matchups: Overspending
by
Jim Baker

05-16

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0

Prospectus Q&A: John Schuerholz
by
Jonah Keri

11-16

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0

Transaction Analysis: October 27-November 2
by
Christina Kahrl

08-23

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0

Breaking Balls: The Best Commissioner of All-Time
by
Derek Zumsteg

05-05

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0

The Return of Swamp Thing
by
Neil deMause

02-16

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: The Rodriguez-for-Soriano Deal
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-12

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0

Transaction Analysis: The Easts
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-18

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0

Prospectus Today: The A-Rod Mess
by
Joe Sheehan

12-10

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: The New Landscape
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-17

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0

The Stadium Game
by
Neil deMause

08-01

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0

Breaking Balls: Don't Take a Slice of My Pie
by
Derek Zumsteg

02-24

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0

Breaking Balls: Portland's Gamble Might Pay Off
by
Derek Zumsteg

08-16

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0

Bridging the Gap
by
Doug Pappas

08-15

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0

The Zumsteg Plan
by
Derek Zumsteg

05-30

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0

Breaking Balls: The Master Plan
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-18

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0

Sensible Revenue Sharing
by
Keith Woolner

03-28

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0

Prospectus Feature: .Baseball In Seattle
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-28

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0

Baseball in Seattle
by
Derek Zumsteg

02-19

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Salary Cap
by
Joe Sheehan

12-20

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0

The Numbers (Part Three)
by
Doug Pappas

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Ben and Sam discuss the latest details of the exquisitely seamy A-Rod story.

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October 23, 2012 5:00 am

Bizball: 2012 MLB Postseason Shows Money Matters

12

Maury Brown

How important is money when it comes to making a deep run into the playoffs?

I don’t care how many times you’ve heard it, but money matters in sports. Somewhere along the line, maybe starting with a book by some guy named Lewis about the A’s, someone confused “money doesn’t win championships” for somehow meaning that money doesn’t matter if you want to be competitive. That’s never been true.

We can haggle over this a bit. There’s empirical evidence—a good bit of which comes from this current season—that a team can get into the playoffs without having a massive player payroll. After all, there was “Moneyball” then, and someone will say we saw a new form of “Moneyball” in Oakland this season. But as Nate Silver and Dayn Perry said so eloquently in Baseball Between the Numbers, Billy Beane’s shit hasn’t worked in the postseason. In truth, having money helps if you wish to go deep into the playoffs.

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October 18, 2012 11:26 am

Overthinking It: Baseball's Most Immovable Players

29

Ben Lindbergh

According to reports, the Marlins may have interest in Alex Rodriguez. Where does he rank among baseball's most difficult players to deal?

According to a report published yesterday, Yankees president Randy Levine and Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria have had a casual conversation about the possibility of a trade between the two teams involving Alex Rodriguez. While the Marlins could use a third baseman and Rodriguez has close ties to Miami, it seems unlikely that they would be willing to pay much of the money he’s owed, and although the Yankees would like to avoid the rest of A-Rod’s decline phase, they won’t want to give him away. Even if there’s little substance to this particular report, though, it could be the opening salvo in a series of A-Rod rumors that might make the rounds this winter.

A-Rod’s combination of age, salary, and disappointing performance would make him a nightmare to move, but where does his contract rank among the majors’ most difficult to deal? No contract is truly untradeable if a team decides it’s a sunk cost, but the dozen deals below would find few takers unless a team were willing to help pay the player’s way out of town. (Note: rankings mostly for fun.)

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August 27, 2012 5:00 am

Bizball: The Priciest Trade Ever Made

29

Maury Brown

A look at the Boston/LA deal that set a record for the most money ever involved in a Major League Baseball trade.

On Saturday, the baseball world saw what it often likes to see in a true blockbuster trade. There may be regrets when all is said and done, but for now, the sides each got what they were looking for. The Red Sox, who had the league’s third-highest Opening Day payroll ($175,249,119), got little aside from salary relief in the deal ; the owners of the Dodgers, who on May 1 closed a $2.15 billion sale, were looking to not only make the playoffs but run clean through to a World Series championship.

As we covered on Saturday here at BP, the nine player deal had the Red Sox trading right-hander Josh Beckett, left fielder Carl Crawford, first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, infielder Nick Punto, and reportedly $12 million cash considerations to the Los Angeles Dodgers for first baseman James Loney, infielder Ivan DeJesus, Jr., right hander Allen Webster, and two players to be named later. Those two players are rumored to be Rubby de la Rosa and Jerry Sands.

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An old law, established during the construction of Tropicana Field, may make things tougher for Florida-based sports teams.

As Big League Stew and others have pointed out, professional sports teams with publicly-funded venues in Florida (including spring training facilities) may soon be forced to deal with an obscure law if one state senator has his way...

In 1988, the Chicago White Sox wanted a new, publicly-funded stadium and the city of St. Petersburg, Florida, was desperate to lure Major League Baseball to its borders. After all, St. Pete had made the acquisition of an MLB team a top goal of theirs at the start of the decade. To that end, the St. Petersburg City Council voted to begin construction of the Florida Suncoast Dome (now known as Tropicana Field) in 1986, despite having no concrete leads as to a possible tenant. It would cost $85 million and be funded through a city and county tax. As you can imagine, when the storied White Sox looked like they were ready to leave Chicago for greener pastures, city and state officials fell over themselves in a rush to woo the club to the Sunshine State.

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Following up with eight more baseball arguments that often don't make sense.

Last week in this space, I unveiled the first seven nominees for the Hall of Famously Weak Baseball Arguments, my fictional museum of unsupportable or outdated baseball beliefs. Below you’ll find those initial seven listed without further comment, along with the final eight. As before, I’ve essayed to describe the times and places where you’ll hear these groaners, why I believe they’re weak, and situations in which they may actually be correct.

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Is the news that we won't have a new commissioner at the end of the year unwelcome, or are we better off with Bud?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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The signing deadline for amateur draftees passed last night, but concerns about the system remain.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Read the full article...

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November 16, 2010 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: J.C. Bradbury, Part I

3

David Laurila

The baseball economist discusses market value, revenue sharing, and a player's value to various teams.

J.C. Bradbury is the author of The Baseball Economist and the newly-released Hot Stove Economics: Understanding Baseball’s Second Season. An associate professor at Kennesaw State University, Bradbury has a Ph.D. in economics from George Mason University.


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August 26, 2010 8:00 am

Prospectus Perspective: Acting Like Thieves or Rational Agents?

35

Matt Swartz

Are the Pirates not trying to be competitive by making a profit or just being good businessmen?

Many fans were outraged last weekend when the Associated Press, which had leaked some of the team's financial statements, reported that the Pirates had earned a profit while receiving money from Major League Baseball via revenue sharing while spending less on player payroll than nearly every other team in the sport. Apparently, fans are shocked that the people who charge them $5 for a hot dog are more interested in their money than their happiness. However, this is exactly what a system like MLB's revenue sharing is bound to do. It creates an incentive for small-market teams to earn more money by not investing in the product on the field.

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April 29, 2010 9:43 am

Ahead in the Count: The Source of the AL's Superiority

16

Matt Swartz

Why the Junior Circuit doesn't take a backseat to the National League.

There is no ambiguity about the fact that the American League is stronger than the National League.  Pretty much everyone has come to understand that the talent level is simply higher in the junior circuit, as players' statistics have routinely declined when they move from the NL to the AL, and improved when they have moved from the AL to the NL.  American League teams have dominated National League teams in interleague play, too. 

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April 27, 2010 9:30 am

Ahead in the Count: Ryan Howard and the New MORP

83

Matt Swartz

Putting new valuation into action to evaluate the big bopper's big extension.

Just days after my two-part series introduced the new MORP to evaluate baseball contracts, the Phillies provided me with an excellent opportunity to put it into action by signing Ryan Howard to a five-year contract extension yesterday.

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