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Articles Tagged Mlb.tv 

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06-16

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 471: The All-MLB.TV Team
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-18

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57

Baseball Prospectus News: MLB.TV Discount Available to BP Premium Subscribers
by
Rob McQuown and Ben Lindbergh

11-13

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37

Bizball: Ranking 10 MLB Relocation and Expansion Markets Shows Why Either is Difficult
by
Maury Brown

09-04

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 34: Making Sense of the Orioles and MLB's Blackout Policy
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-21

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23

The Payoff Pitch: Blackout and Blue
by
Neil deMause

05-06

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16

Squawking Baseball: At Bat for iPad Review
by
Shawn Hoffman

02-18

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25

Squawking Baseball: Non-traditional viewing
by
Shawn Hoffman

07-29

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16

The Biz Beat: Seeing Everything?
by
Shawn Hoffman

06-24

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12

The Biz Beat: Live Streaming on the iPhone
by
Shawn Hoffman

04-16

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19

The Biz Beat: Give it Away, Give it Away Now
by
Shawn Hoffman

02-05

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13

Opening Up MLB.com
by
Shawn Hoffman

04-12

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0

Blackout Blues
by
Maury Brown

05-17

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1

Lies, Damned Lies: Moving the Marlins
by
Nate Silver

03-26

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0

The Ledger Domain: iN Demand and MLB Tussle Over Extra Innings
by
Maury Brown

03-12

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0

The Ledger Domain: Not a Done Deal...Yet
by
Maury Brown

02-12

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0

The Ledger Domain: A Deeper Look at the Exclusive Extra Innings to DirecTV Deal
by
Maury Brown

02-08

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0

Caribbean Series
by
Derek Jacques

01-22

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0

Prospectus Today: The Deal Almost No One Likes
by
Joe Sheehan

12-04

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0

The Ledger Domain: Why the Free Spending?
by
Maury Brown

07-24

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0

The Ledger Domain: Blackout Blues
by
Maury Brown

05-29

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0

The Ledger Domain: MLBAM Wants You Wired
by
Maury Brown

12-12

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0

The Numbers (Part Two)
by
Doug Pappas

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Ben and Sam discuss the players they drop everything to watch on MLB.TV.

Read the full article...

BP Premium and Super-Premium subscribers are now eligible for a 20% discount off MLB.tv!

If you've ever tried to settle an argument by citing a statistic developed in the last decade, you may have found yourself on the receiving end of a common refrain: "Get your head out of that spreadsheet and try watching a game." Of course, there's never been any truth to the idea that people who like to study baseball stats do so instead of seeing games. If and when we have our heads stuck in spreadsheets, it's because we watch a lot of games and enjoy them so much that we want to better understand what we're seeing. And for people who watch a lot of baseball, the ability to stream games online through MLB.TV since the 2002 season has made life a lot better.

Which brings us to today's good news. All current and new yearly Baseball Prospectus Premium and Super Premium subscribers are in for a special bonus: a one-time coupon good for a 20 percent discount on a 2014 MLB.TV Premium Yearly Subscription.

Read the full article...

A look at the ten most likely places for a new MLB club

It seems that nearly every week, articles surrounding the potential relocation of the A’s and Rays surface. A panel looking into a potential San Jose relocation for the A’s has been gridlocked since 2009 (and remember, the A’s have been looking to move to San Jose for a heck of a lot longer than that). The Rays haven’t been far behind in their efforts to get out of Tropicana Field. Whether it’s the commute for fans to get to the domed stadium, the aesthetics, or the need to be closer to an urban core, it seems that Tampa Bay has been seeking a new ballpark for just as long. Relocation for these two clubs is crucial.

Another thing that comes up less frequently but has extra meaning going into 2013 is expansion. With the Astros moving into the AL West, the American League and National League will now be balanced at 15 clubs a piece. The problem is that 15 is an odd number, and as a result, interleague will become a daily affair. It’s unlikely that’s something that the league wanted, so getting to 32 clubs would take care of that matter. That would mean revenues spread thinner with two extra mouths to feed. Additionally, it’s no given that one or both wouldn’t be revenue-sharing takers, and trying to get ballparks built is no easy feat in this economy. So, 30 is a number that seems to suit the “Big Four” sports leagues in North America. The NBA has it. Ditto for the NHL. Currently, only the NFL—which has the advantage of being highly centralized (revenues are shared more evenly across the franchises) and exceptionally popular—is the exception at 32 clubs.

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Ben and Sam discuss two baseball mysteries: the Orioles' success in 2012, and MLB's blackout policy.

Ben and Sam discuss two baseball mysteries: the Orioles' success in 2012, and MLB's blackout policy.

Episode 34: "Making Sense of the Orioles and MLB's Blackout Policy"

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Will MLB.tv ever make your home team's games available for web viewing?

Living in the future has its advantages. Back when I was a kid, in the late Pleistocene, catching a ballgame remotely meant either watching your local teams on TV or, if you were away from your living room, listening on the radio; maybe if you were very lucky and it was late at night and the ionosphere was aligned just right, you might be able to just barely tune in something that might possibly be Ernie Harwell on an out-of-town broadcast. Today, anyone with $99.99 burning a hole in their credit card ($119.99 if you want DVR-style gewgaws like fast-forward and rewind) can sign up for MLB.tv and watch any game, whether spring training, regular season, or postseason, on their computer, iPad, smartphone, or PlayStation 3—I'm sure that right this moment someone somewhere at MLB Advanced Media is working on an app that will stream hi-def baseball video live to the dashboard display of your flying car, just as soon as those are invented.

Any game, that is, unless it's one involving your local team. In that case, you're still stuck with 20th-century technology, and either tethered to your TV or forced to stick with audio. Any attempt to do otherwise will result in that dreaded message familiar to MLB.tv users: "We're sorry. Due to your current location you are blacked out of watching the game you have selected...."

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May 6, 2010 8:00 am

Squawking Baseball: At Bat for iPad Review

16

Shawn Hoffman

MLB.tv's app for the iPad is pretty sweet.

Back in January, when Apple finally debuted the iPad after years of speculation, Major League Baseball was one of the few companies invited to demo their application live at the unveiling. After seeing MLBAM's presentation, it was no wonder: At Bat for iPad looked incredible, particularly MLB.tv, and I went as far as to call it "the future of baseball broadcasting."

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February 18, 2010 7:06 pm

Squawking Baseball: Non-traditional viewing

25

Shawn Hoffman

This could be the year that watching MLB games on mediums other than television takes off.

We're coming up on a really fascinating period in the history of sports media. At some point in the next five to 10 years, the television industry is going to be staring down the same barrel that the music industry has been looking at for the last decade. Cable in particular is just waiting to get its lunch eaten, as our already-exorbitant monthly rates keep going up thanks to more and more basic-tier channels that we'll never, ever watch. For the major sports leagues (and even some of the non-major ones, for that matter), the options are pretty clear: develop some contingency plans, or risk losing an incredibly large chunk of your revenues.

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July 29, 2009 11:57 am

The Biz Beat: Seeing Everything?

16

Shawn Hoffman

Two leagues, and two massively different approaches to streaming.

In a lot of ways, MLB Advanced Media really gets it. Their marketing strategy needs a major overhaul-they're trying to be a portal in a post-portal world, and it's grossly limiting their earning potential-but their technology is best-in-breed, and they really seem to understand that sports games will eventually be broadcast and distributed by the leagues themselves, not third-party networks. And why not? Once internet-enabled televisions and super-high-speed broadband become commonplace, cable networks will start being phased out, and MLB Extra Innings will become unnecessary. MLB can just cut out the middle man and make MLB.tv its primary method of distributing baseball games-on your television, computer, or mobile phone.

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June 24, 2009 12:30 pm

The Biz Beat: Live Streaming on the iPhone

12

Shawn Hoffman

A closer look at the performance and the possibilities of the upgraded MLB At Bat baseball app.

For sports business and tech nerds, last Wednesday seemed like our equivalent of a man walking on the moon. MLB Advanced Media launched live-game streaming on its MLB At Bat iPhone application, following Apple's long-awaited iPhone 3.0 software update. For the first time, we're now able to watch live baseball on our mobile phones, without any complicated workarounds or external devices. Yes, we are officially in the future.

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April 16, 2009 12:01 pm

The Biz Beat: Give it Away, Give it Away Now

19

Shawn Hoffman

Major League Baseball struggles to come to terms with a swiftly evolving marketplace where much of what you have to sell may be best offered for free.

Through a number of technological and legal means, [MLB has] tried like crazy to maintain control over what their customers consume. They've failed, like most entities not named De Beers. The result is a huge base of "Open Source" MLB entertainment... Open source has provided MLB with an entirely new engine for generating fan interest, one they could not have developed on their own.
-Gary Huckabay, BP 2009


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February 5, 2009 12:41 pm

Opening Up MLB.com

13

Shawn Hoffman

Making their original content both accessible and free may be the best possible option.

Despite the horrendous economy, MLBAM is actually in a rare sweet spot. The business models that worked for media companies in the twentieth century are on life support, and may be gone faster than anybody had anticipated. (Would you advertise in a newspaper right now?) Every dollar is precious, and companies are looking for advertising mediums that can give them a more quantifiable return. Naturally, most are shifting to the internet, where every action is trackable. So even as total advertising output shrinks, the online pie will continue to grow.

MLBAM is in a great position to take advantage of that, since it already has two robust revenue streams (which is one more than most dominant internet companies). According to BusinessWeek.com, half of BAM's revenue (about $225 million in 2008) came from MLB.tv subscriptions, while the other half came from advertising and "other extras." The MLB.tv business should grow organically; the underlying technology is constantly improving, and high-speed internet access will only become more ubiquitous. At $120, it's a tremendous value-you can't watch six games at once on MLB Extra Innings-so there's no reason to think the product will be anything but an obvious winner. And it will only get even more interesting when internet-enabled televisions become the norm in a couple of years.

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April 12, 2008 12:00 am

Blackout Blues

0

Maury Brown

Want to kick back and enjoy a game this fine Saturday afternoon? Your options are limited by MLB's fan-unfriendly policies.

Nothing is more maddening than feeling like you were buying into a good thing, only to be trapped in the fine print. Take being a baseball fan, for instance. You moved across the country and want to catch your former home team? Here's MLB Extra Innings for television. Traveling and can't get to a TV? Here's MLB.TV for your computer. Want to get video updates, but are away from both? OK, here are near real-time highlights sent to your mobile device. Nowadays, options are plenty if you want to see a game, but can't make it to the ballpark.

Or are they?

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