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02-15

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10

Pitcher Profile: Milwaukee's Rotation Brew
by
Harry Pavlidis

02-12

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6

Wezen-Ball: The Night Pete Rose Broke the Record
by
Larry Granillo

11-13

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37

Bizball: Ranking 10 MLB Relocation and Expansion Markets Shows Why Either is Difficult
by
Maury Brown

07-16

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19

Bizball: Playing the MLB All-Star Game Television Ratings Game
by
Maury Brown

03-08

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3

Painting the Black: The Show Review
by
R.J. Anderson

02-07

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12

Future Shock: Atlanta Braves Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-31

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9

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Knuckleball Mystique: Using PITCHf/x to Distinguish Perception from Reality
by
Alan M. Nathan

12-12

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107

Prospectus Hit and Run: Braun Banned for PEDs [Version 9]
by
Jay Jaffe

11-17

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48

The Lineup Card: 11 Ballplayers Who Suffered Unusual Demises
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-07

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1

Resident Fantasy Genius: Q&A with Brian Kenny
by
Derek Carty

10-14

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21

Baseball ProGUESTus: When 100 Tiles Meets 27 Outs
by
Diane Firstman

09-23

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16

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Los Angeles Dodgers
by
Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

09-20

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13

The Asian Equation: The Future of the NPB Import Market
by
Michael Street

09-14

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41

The BP Broadside: In Which the Commish is Eviscerated
by
Steven Goldman

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

08-01

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0

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH for 8/1/11
by
Michael Street

07-07

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14

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports
by
Michael Street

06-10

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Interviews with an Indelible Owner
by
Tim Marchman

05-11

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28

The Asian Equation
by
Michael Street

04-19

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26

The Payoff Pitch: Plenty of Good Seats Still Available
by
Neil deMause

04-05

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9

The Payoff Pitch: Probing the Forbes Figures
by
Neil deMause

04-01

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0

Baseball ProGUESTus: Answer Me These Questions Three
by
Mike Ferrin

02-16

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: Check, Call, Reyes, Fold?
by
Jay Jaffe

02-07

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21

Future Shock: Cincinnati Reds Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-25

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36

Future Shock: Chicago White Sox Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-10

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6

The Week in Quotes: January 3-9
by
Alex Carnevale

12-24

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19

Future Shock: Florida Marlins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-15

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8

Overthinking It: The Magic Touch?
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-30

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7

On the Beat: No Problem with the Pirates
by
John Perrotto

08-29

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2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-19

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0

The Week in Quotes: July 12-18
by
Alex Carnevale

07-13

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14

Prospectus Q&A: Jeff Ma
by
Will Carroll

06-23

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11

Under The Knife: Beltran's Clock Ready to Tick
by
Will Carroll

04-21

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27

UTK Special: The Volquez Suspension
by
Will Carroll

03-12

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6

MLB 10
by
Marc Normandin

03-12

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22

MLB 10
by
Marc Normandin

03-07

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Chaz Scoggins
by
David Laurila

03-01

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5

The Week in Quotes: February 22-28
by
Alex Carnevale

02-26

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40

Future Shock: Giants Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-18

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25

Squawking Baseball: Non-traditional viewing
by
Shawn Hoffman

02-08

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40

Future Shock: Dodgers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-03

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18

Transaction Action: The 10,000 Arms of Dr. T.
by
Christina Kahrl

01-11

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15

Ahead in the Count: Part 2 of Service-time Contracts and Wins
by
Matt Swartz

12-28

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3

The Week in Quotes: December 21-27
by
Alex Carnevale

10-12

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2

The Week in Quotes: October 5-11
by
Alex Carnevale

09-14

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14

The Week in Quotes: September 7-13
by
Alex Carnevale

07-29

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16

The Biz Beat: Seeing Everything?
by
Shawn Hoffman

06-24

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12

The Biz Beat: Live Streaming on the iPhone
by
Shawn Hoffman

05-31

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47

Prospectus Idol Entry: Breakouts, Breakdowns, or Just Outliers?
by
Brian Cartwright

05-17

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52

Prospectus Idol Entry: Brian Cartwright's Initial Entry
by
Brian Cartwright

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A look at what the Brewers' rotation options offer from a stuff (and beer) perspective.

I like the old cliché, “You go as far as your starting pitching takes you.” It's best to have about seven to nine arms handy to get through the season, because pitchers often get hurt or fail to meet expectations.

Brewers fans may recall a recent season where they barely used six starters. Then, of course, there's last year, when they needed 11. Somewhere in between is normal. For the 2013 Brewers, the question is not if they will go deep into their rotation, but when. And as the summer nears, manager Ron Roenicke will be handing the ball to quite a few young arms.

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A look at the broadcast and celebration from the biggest day of Pete Rose's career.

There is a secret haven of MLB gems hidden in iTunes right now. Under the heading "Baseball's Best," you can find over 150 games ranging from the 1952 World Series to Mark Buehrle's perfect game in 2009. The games feature no-hitters, record-breakers, classic postseason battles and more. Best of all, these games are available in their full, original broadcast (including everything but the commercials) for only $1.99. Today we look at one of these gems: the San Diego at Cincinnati match on September 11, 1985, when Pete Rose finally surpassed Ty Cobb for the title of All-Time Hit King.

It's Wednesday night at Riverfront Stadium. The night before, over 51,000 Reds fans had watched 44-year-old player/manager Pete Rose face off against Padres pitcher LaMarr Hoyt in an attempt to break his tie with Ty Cobb atop the all-time hits leaderboard with his 4,192nd career base hit. Rose was hitless in four at-bats, popping out each time he came to the plate. Tonight, it's 47,000 people cheering their lungs out at the ballpark (bringing the season-long attendance to an "outstanding" 1.6 million). Everyone in Cincinnati is ready to explode in celebration when the moment 23 years in the making finally happens. Luckily for Rose, he has a sympathetic manager penciling in his .267 average and .329 slugging percentage into the number two spot in the lineup (to be fair, Rose's OBP in early September was still a very solid .389).

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A look at the ten most likely places for a new MLB club

It seems that nearly every week, articles surrounding the potential relocation of the A’s and Rays surface. A panel looking into a potential San Jose relocation for the A’s has been gridlocked since 2009 (and remember, the A’s have been looking to move to San Jose for a heck of a lot longer than that). The Rays haven’t been far behind in their efforts to get out of Tropicana Field. Whether it’s the commute for fans to get to the domed stadium, the aesthetics, or the need to be closer to an urban core, it seems that Tampa Bay has been seeking a new ballpark for just as long. Relocation for these two clubs is crucial.

Another thing that comes up less frequently but has extra meaning going into 2013 is expansion. With the Astros moving into the AL West, the American League and National League will now be balanced at 15 clubs a piece. The problem is that 15 is an odd number, and as a result, interleague will become a daily affair. It’s unlikely that’s something that the league wanted, so getting to 32 clubs would take care of that matter. That would mean revenues spread thinner with two extra mouths to feed. Additionally, it’s no given that one or both wouldn’t be revenue-sharing takers, and trying to get ballparks built is no easy feat in this economy. So, 30 is a number that seems to suit the “Big Four” sports leagues in North America. The NBA has it. Ditto for the NHL. Currently, only the NFL—which has the advantage of being highly centralized (revenues are shared more evenly across the franchises) and exceptionally popular—is the exception at 32 clubs.

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Ratings for the MLB All-Star Game were up this year, but does that really tell the whole story?

Television ratings are a funny thing. The spin that can come out of the numbers can drive reports in wildly divergent directions. In sports, ratings can be spun to say that the popularity of a given league or club is high or low, depending on those feeding the information. Of course, leagues and clubs love to tout growth, while detractors can spin numbers negatively. For Major League Baseball, ratings have been used to show that the game’s popularity is on the rise, while others have pounded keys to say that it’s a “dying sport.”

So, which one is it? As is often the case in data analysis, the truth can lie in the middle. Before we get started, let’s give a quick primer on what the ratings numbers mean.

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March 8, 2012 3:00 am

Painting the Black: The Show Review

3

R.J. Anderson

Does the newest edition of The Show deliver on its promise of an interactive baseball broadcast?

MLB 12: The Show aspires to be an interactive baseball broadcast—it says so on the box. Ergo, the developers designed the game to be a made-for-television event made for Playstation.

The baseball-broadcasting staples are present. Close-ups focusing on the pitcher or hitter’s face depend on the result of the previous pitch. Should Roy Halladay struggle to throw strikes then the simulation is a poor one, but your unreal Halladay will fidget with the baseball or wipe his brow in between offerings. Walk the leadoff hitter in a tight spot and Charlie Manuel will appear troubled. Have Shane Victorino gun down a runner and you might see him flex afterward; similarly, expect Placido Polanco to glare at his glove after committing an error. Emotional response from the actors is a key piece of a baseball broadcast. The Show understands and employs this as well as any game has before.

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February 7, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Atlanta Braves Top 11 Prospects

12

Kevin Goldstein

Atlanta's system has several high-caliber pitchers but few hitters to match their upside.

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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Finding out whether knuckleballs actually flutter, with the help of our friendly neighborhood physicist.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Alan Nathan is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. After a long career doing experimental nuclear/particle physics, he now spends his time doing research in the physics of baseball. He maintains a web site devoted to this topic at http://webusers.npl.illinois.edu/~a-nathan/pob/His younger colleagues at Complete Game Consulting have bestowed upon him the exalted title of Chief Scientist.
 


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National League MVP has tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs and faces a 50-game suspension barring an unprecedented overturning of the result.

This story was initially published around 8:30 PM ET on Saturday night and has since been revised several times as new information has emerged. Please scroll down to see updates.


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Not all players leave the game or this world via the traditional retirement path

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With MLB Network's debut of "Clubhouse Confidential" scheduled for tonight, the show's host discusses what to expect and the use of stats on the program.

This weekend, I had a great chat with Brian Kenny, former “SportsCenter” anchor and the soon-to-be-host of the MLB Network’s latest show, “Clubhouse Confidential,” television’s first sabermetrically-slanted baseball program. “Clubhouse Confidential” debuts tonight at 5:30 EST, and I had the chance to talk with Brian ahead of the premiere about his background with sabermetrics, what we should expect from the show, and some other topics. You can check out the press release announcing the show here to get some additional background.

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Exploring the connections between baseball and Scrabble, naming an all-time Scrabble team, and coming up with a baseball variant of the famous board game.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Diane Firstman wanted to be the first female general manager in the Majors, but a degree in Athletic Administration and an internship with the Elias Sports Bureau didn’t bear fruit. So, she toils by day as a data analyst for the City of New York. She was the first “fan” to start a blog over at MLB.COM in 2005, and her “Diamonds are for Humor” was voted “Best Comedic Blog” that year. More recently, she contributed quirky stories and analysis to the “Humbug Journal” blog at Baseball Toaster, had an essay included in the “Lasting Yankee Stadium Memories” anthology, and offered game recaps and offbeat statistical analysis at the “Bronx Banter” site. Her latest venture is her own “Value Over Replacement Grit” blog, which features unusual statistical analysis of everything from player name lengths to players’ Body Mass Indexes. 

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September 23, 2011 5:00 am

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Los Angeles Dodgers

16

Steven Goldman, Kevin Goldstein and ESPN Insider

The team's problems might linger as long as Frank McCourt does

Kiss 'Em Goodbye is a series focusing on MLB teams as their postseason dreams fadewhether in September (or before), the league division series, league championship series or World Series. It combines a broad overview from Baseball Prospectus, a front-office take from former MLB GM Jim Bowden, a best- and worst-case scenario ZiPS projection for 2012 from Dan Szymborski, and Kevin Goldstein's farm-system overview.

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