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Articles Tagged Minnesota Twins 

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07-29

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2

Transaction Analysis: Nunez's Career-Year Moves to San Francisco
by
Aaron Gleeman and Adam McInturff

07-26

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2

Prospectus Feature: Miguel Sano Is a Strikeout Pioneer
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-19

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5

Prospectus Feature: Twin Killing
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-14

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2

Prospectus Feature: Where These Terrible Twins Go From Here
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-12

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4

Prospectus Feature: The Out-of-Nowhere All-Stars
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-26

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0

Team Chemistry: Explaining the DRA-Beaters
by
John Choiniere

06-08

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0

Team Chemistry: The Outsized Importance of a Joe Mauer Cold Streak
by
John Choiniere

05-31

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4

Prospectus Feature: Buxton's Back, and Not Busted Yet
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-24

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2

Prospectus Feature: Joe Nathan's Got One Thing To Prove
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-22

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3

Rubbing Mud: So You Want to Fire Your General Manager
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-19

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11

Prospectus Feature: So Long, Jose Berrios; See You Soon?
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-18

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8

Transaction Analysis: Fredi, Blame, Fired
by
Aaron Gleeman, Wilson Karaman and Matthew Trueblood

05-17

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5

What You Need to Know: Jose Berrios: Not An Instant Ace
by
Daniel Rathman

05-17

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10

Prospectus Feature: The Fall of the Ryan Empire
by
Aaron Gleeman

04-29

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1

Raising Aces: Debut Ante: Jose Berrios
by
Doug Thorburn

04-19

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26

Rubbing Mud: Joe Mauer and Me
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-15

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0

What You Need to Know: Nobody Is 0-21, Yet
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-07

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7

Prospectus Feature: Can the Twins Sweep ROY Voting, Still Lose?
by
Bryan Grosnick

03-30

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0

Rumor Roundup: Who Will Save The Phillies' 55ish Wins This Year?
by
Emma Baccellieri

03-02

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13

Outta Left Field: The Remarkable Buxton Projection
by
Dustin Palmateer

02-29

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4

Winter Is Leaving
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-17

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6

Prospectus Feature: The Way-Too-Early Baseball Awards Breakdown
by
Bryan Grosnick

01-05

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2

Rubbing Mud: Kyle Gibson's Encouraging Comp, and Kyle Gibson's Really Encouraging Comp
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-22

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8

Rubbing Mud: Same Old Twins
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-04

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0

Transaction Analysis: Park-Life
by
Bret Sayre

11-11

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8

Rubbing Mud: The Great Big Exasperated AL Central Shrug
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-02

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0

What You Need to Know: Wild!
by
Chris Mosch

09-18

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4

Rubbing Mud: The Twins vs the Universe
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-24

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4

Rubbing Mud: Trading Trevor Plouffe
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-01

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11

Rubbing Mud: OMG Twinsies
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-08

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2

What You Need to Know: Smoked!
by
Daniel Rathman

05-05

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6

The Call-Up: Eddie Rosario
by
Christopher Crawford and Craig Goldstein

05-01

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6

What You Need to Know: Sold!
by
Chris Mosch

04-10

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0

BP Unfiltered: The Best Part of the Twins Season So Far
by
Zachary Levine

04-03

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27

Rubbing Mud: Four Good Young PItchers, Four Unusual Situations
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-27

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7

Every Team's Moneyball: Minnesota Twins: Rebuilding in Plain View
by
Ken Funck

03-26

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6

Transaction Analysis: It's Olivera Now, Baby Blue
by
R.J. Anderson

03-13

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11

Rubbing Mud: How the Twins Discovered Moneyball 10 Years Too Late
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-17

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26

2015 Prospects: 2015 Organizational Rankings
by
Mark Anderson, Jeff Moore and BP Prospect Staff

02-09

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149

2015 Prospects: Top 101 Prospects of 2015
by
Nick J. Faleris, Chris Mellen and BP Prospect Staff

01-09

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32

2015 Prospects: Minnesota Twins Top 10 Prospects
by
Chris Mellen and BP Prospect Staff

12-23

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3

Transaction Analysis: Gently Hughes'd
by
R.J. Anderson

12-12

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6

Transaction Analysis: Santana and Morales, One Year Later
by
Sam Miller

12-03

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2

Transaction Analysis: The Surprisingly High Price of Nostalgia
by
Sahadev Sharma and Nick Shlain

11-05

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3

Transaction Analysis: Lind Blows Out of Toronto
by
R.J. Anderson and Mike Gianella

10-29

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3

Fantasy Team Preview: Minnesota Twins
by
Mike Gianella

10-01

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0

Transaction Analysis: Playing a Hinch
by
R.J. Anderson

08-22

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6

Painting the Black: A Marlins Fastball, A Twins Approach
by
R.J. Anderson

08-05

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6

Transaction Analysis: The Reasonable Overpay of Kurt Suzuki
by
R.J. Anderson

07-31

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7

Transaction Analysis: A's hire A's
by
R.J. Anderson, Bret Sayre and Ben Carsley

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It was a disaster for the Twins pitcher, just like down the road it was a disaster for the Blue Jays pitcher, J.A. Happ.

The Monday Takeaway
There were eight major-league games played yesterday, and half of them featured a team scoring double-digit runs. Only one of them chased the opposing starter in the first inning, though, and that same team’s skipper was gone by the fourth. That’s ample reason to begin this recap in Detroit, where there was a whole lot offense accompanied by a whole lot of ugly on Monday night.

Jose Berrios took the hill in the last of the first and figured, “Ah, I’ll just groove a fastball for strike one.” Little did he know that Ian Kinsler was locked, loaded, and ready to fire:


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Can anybody in 2016 identify what the Twins are good at?

Twins general manager Terry Ryan is a Well-Respected Baseball Man™.

He was drafted by the Twins in 1972 and pitched four seasons in their farm system. From there he became a scout and, eventually, the Twins' scouting director. In the fall of 1994, when two-time World Series-winning general manager Andy MacPhail left the Twins to take the same job with the Cubs, the team chose Ryan as his replacement. He's been the Twins' general manager for 18 total seasons split between two stints, separated by a self-imposed four-season hiatus. Terry Ryan is the Minnesota Twins.

That cliché about someone who has forgotten more about something than most people will ever know is absolutely true of Ryan, a 62-year-old baseball lifer who has earned universal respect from his peers in baseball and from the media covering baseball. All of that is undeniable. However, also undeniable is that Ryan's overall winning percentage as Twins general manager is just .474; the team has won a grand total of one playoff series since 1995. They haven't won a playoff game since 2004, and the Twins have the second-worst record in baseball during Ryan's second stint, with a fifth 90-loss season in the past six years currently looking likely following a disastrous 10-27 start.

When the Twins were winning six AL Central titles in nine years from 2002-2010 they were known for remaining old school as MLB front offices increasingly went new school. Basically they were known for being Terry Ryan, continuing to rely on their scouting chops and well-established organizational approach as waves of analytics and innovation swirled around them. All of that remains true now, except the Twins have fallen even further behind in the various new-school categories while failing to dominate on the old-school side like they used to. In short, it's not obvious what they're even good at relative to the other 29 teams anymore.

It's been quite a while since Ryan's actual moves and the Twins' actual record matched his sterling reputation. There aren't many teams that would stick with a GM for two decades of .474 baseball and zero playoff success. There aren't many markets in which that GM and his longtime front office assistants would receive little criticism and tons of praise for producing 11 losing seasons in 18 years. But the Twins and Minnesota are that rare combination, which is why this preamble seems somehow necessary just to get to a point where it feels comfortable to say ... well, it's no longer clear that Terry Ryan should be the Twins' general manager.

Ryan is extraordinarily conservative, which has shown itself in his aversion to spending big money on outside free agents and in several seasons deciding to flat-out leave $10 million or more in projected, ownership-approved payroll unspent. He's targeted mid-level, low-upside veterans in free agency rather than going after bigger fish, most recently spending $200 million on the meh-worthy pitching quintet of Ricky Nolasco, Ervin Santana, Phil Hughes, Mike Pelfrey, and Kevin Correia. Those five free agent additions have combined to give the Twins a 4.60 ERA in 1,435 innings; three of the contracts stretch beyond this season.

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April 29, 2016 7:57 am

Raising Aces: Debut Ante: Jose Berrios

1

Doug Thorburn

The Twins' top pitching prospect showed both why he's heralded and why he's a rookie on Wednesday.

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Eventually, baseball gives back.

If you’re a long-time reader, a follower on Twitter, or otherwise know me in any substantial way, this won’t be news, but in case none of that is true, here’s the piece of information you most need in order to understand this article: My eldest son, Emerson, died on March 28th. We held his funeral and buried him a week later, on Opening Day.

I don’t tell you this so that you’ll feel sorry for me. Nothing in this broken world is perfect, not even the tragedy of my son’s death. He was diagnosed with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) when my wife was 20 weeks pregnant. Somewhere just past 30 weeks, we also found out that he had at least some hydrocephalus—fluid buildup in his brain, the extent and clinical impact of which would be impossible to know for a while. He had open-heart surgeries when he was four days old and five months old, and a kidney surgery tucked neatly in between. We found out when he was a little over a month old (from doctors conferring during rounds, not knowing we were able to hear them) that there was only a 50 percent chance of Emerson surviving that first surgery and the period immediately afterward. He needed a tracheostomy tube and ventilator support for two years, had the trach for another six months. He never ate, except via feeding tube and pump, directly to his stomach. He never learned to walk or talk. He needed glasses and hearing aids. At two and a half, he was finally diagnosed with Kabuki Syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects multiple systems within the body, and which finally helped his doctors paint a complete picture of his myriad issues.

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The Braves and the Twins slouch toward the first overall pick, while Jaime Garcia almost pulls a Velasquez.

The Thursday Takeaway
It’s early, we say. Indeed it is. For the Braves and Twins, the season is but nine games old. Yet they have been a very long nine games for both teams; a fruitless and unforgiving nine games. All 18 games have ended in losses. The two teams both lost on Thursday.


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Does "three contributing rookies" correlate more closely to "rebuilding team" or "really good team"?

Flying cars, beaches in Kentucky, and Lucas Giolito—the future is going to be awesome. At the same time, we have no idea exactly how things will turn out. Still, armchair prognosticators and analyst-experts alike do our best. As such, the Baseball Prospectus staff published predictions for the 2016 season. As was noted by readers—and discussed briefly on Effectively Wild—the Twins have two interesting facets to their seasonal predictions. First, the top three predicted finishers in the American League Rookie of the Year voting are all members of the Twins: Byron Buxton, Jose Berrios, and Byung-Ho Park. Second, the Twins are projected to win just 78 games by PECOTA, but the staff predicts that they’ll come in fifth in the American League Central.

The best question here is this: Could the Twins be both a team with the three best rookies in the American League and also be a last-place team? There’s only one way to find out. (Just kidding, there are probably three.) But here’s one way: We can go back and look at previous years’ Rookie of the Year voting, examine the other teams that have had multiple ROY candidates, and see how they've fared.

I’m not looking for anything so strong as running the table for all three top spots in the Rookie of the Year voting. (Spoiler alert, that hasn’t happened in the past 30 years.) All I want is to find two or more rookies who received 5 percent of the vote. As such, I looked at the past 30 seasons—going back to the 1986 campaign. In the end, I found 15 teams in the past 30 seasons who fielded two players (or more) who earned 5 percent or more of the Rookie of the Year votes.

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A closer battle in Philadelphia, urination in Queens, and another year of Ricky Nolasco clogging up your Probable Starters options.

Ricky Nolasco takes Twins fifth-starter role
That one of the largest free agent contracts in Twins history belongs to none other than Ricky Nolasco can be used as a stand-in for several larger points. It can be an example of how extreme the market for free agent pitching has become; it can be ammunition for fans frustrated with the front office; it can be a cautionary tale about the volatility of middle-of-the-rotation pitching. And in addition to representing all of the above, Nolasco and his contract can now represent something else—the Twins’ fifth starter.


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Is Byron Buxton's defense as valuable as PECOTA says?

It happened on June 10, 2013.

Byron Buxton, playing center field for the Low-A Cedar Rapids Kernels, took a stride to his right, then, realizing the ball was ticketed for the gap in left-center, raced some 85 feet back—I measured—to meet the ball before it completed its descent, diving headlong on the warning track to snare it.

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February 29, 2016 6:00 am

Winter Is Leaving

4

Matthew Trueblood

No, really: The Twins pitch to contact. (Still. For now.)

The Twins’ penchant for pitching to contact is one of the most consistent organizational philosophies (and by now, one of the most tired tropes) in baseball. For the last five years, the Twins have had the lowest team strikeout rate in the American League, every year. The league’s aggregate strikeout rate has shot up over that span. Strikeout accumulation has become the top run-prevention priority of every organization, as teams have come to understand that there’s no more reliable way to slow an opposing offense than missing a lot of bats. The Twins, though, keep plodding along at the bottom of the league.

It would be unfair to pretend that the team hasn’t noticed this league-wide trend, or that they’re actively resisting it. Indeed, a great 2013 piece by Ben Lindbergh here at BP provides some strong evidence that 2011 is roughly the exact moment at which the Twins began committing to the strikeout, just like everyone else. Here’s the problem: That commitment manifested itself only in the pitchers they sought out as prospects. In trades and in the Draft, the team has started seeking out young power pitchers, guys who throw hard and miss bats.

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Using PECOTA + context to handicap this year's MVP, Cy Young and Rookie of the Year races.

February is too early to try to predict major baseball awards. Hell, August is often too early to try to predict major baseball awards. Nevertheless, in celebration of the release of PECOTA, I’m here to take my hack at things. Though I’ve never been an especially successful prognosticator in the past, I find the old cliché to be true: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again (using better data).”

We can use PECOTA’s advice to help project a player’s upcoming performance, and while most people gravitate towards the WARP totals and the slash lines, those aren’t the only tools in the toolbox. We can use the percentile projections to see what the system figures the high end or low end of a player’s performance range might be. We can use the Breakout/Improve/Collapse/Attrition percentages to gauge the ways in which performance might shift from history. And we can look at component and peripheral pieces, filtering out the items we think might be most or least variable, and adjust our assessments accordingly.

With a little back-of-the-napkin work, we can also attempt to add the appropriate context to the data PECOTA provides. If MVP or Cy Young voting was a WARP sorting exercise, it’d be painfully simple to predict. Fortunately, it’s neither the sorting exercise or simple to predict. Contextual factors such as how the player displays their value in attention-grabbing ways (shout out to homers and strikeouts) and how a player’s team performs make it just a bit more difficult to choose an award winner based on numbers alone.

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What Kyle Gibson does that is almost, but not quite, unique.

Kyle Gibson had Tommy John surgery on September 7, 2011. The Twins won that day, but they had lost the five games prior to that one, and they would lose the next 11, as they hurtled toward a 63-99 car wreck of a finish. It didn’t much matter, since Gibson wasn’t quite on the doorstep of the majors when he went under the knife, but it would turn out to be bad timing. See, Gibson was back on the mound in miraculously little time, making seven rehab appearances for the Twins’ Gulf Coast League club in July 2012. By the end of that month, though, the Twins were far from contention again, and they traded the expiring contract of Francisco Liriano to the White Sox. Gibson debuted in Minnesota on another losing team a year later, but the ships had passed in the night. Improbably, the Twins developed two pitchers with the same radical, nearly unique approach to their craft within just a couple years of each other, but the pair never shared a starting rotation.

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The circumstances change, but the Twins never do. Is that their problem?

Three previously rebuilding teams had good seasons in 2015. The Cubs and Astros were each the second-best team in their league according to third-order winning percentage, and the Twins, despite the AL’s second-worst third-order record, won 83 games and stayed in the Wild Card hunt until late September. It was Houston’s first winning season since 2007, Chicago’s first since 2009, and Minnesota’s first since 2010. All three have positioned themselves as contenders in 2016, to varying degrees, and each is eager to tell you how great it is to be done with the hard endeavor of trading so many todays for a better tomorrow.

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