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07-19

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5

Prospectus Feature: Twin Killing
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-14

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2

Prospectus Feature: Where These Terrible Twins Go From Here
by
Aaron Gleeman

07-12

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3

Prospectus Feature: The Out-of-Nowhere All-Stars
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-26

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0

Team Chemistry: Explaining the DRA-Beaters
by
John Choiniere

06-08

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0

Team Chemistry: The Outsized Importance of a Joe Mauer Cold Streak
by
John Choiniere

05-31

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4

Prospectus Feature: Buxton's Back, and Not Busted Yet
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-24

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2

Prospectus Feature: Joe Nathan's Got One Thing To Prove
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-22

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3

Rubbing Mud: So You Want to Fire Your General Manager
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-19

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11

Prospectus Feature: So Long, Jose Berrios; See You Soon?
by
Aaron Gleeman

05-18

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8

Transaction Analysis: Fredi, Blame, Fired
by
Aaron Gleeman, Wilson Karaman and Matthew Trueblood

05-17

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5

What You Need to Know: Jose Berrios: Not An Instant Ace
by
Daniel Rathman

05-17

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10

Prospectus Feature: The Fall of the Ryan Empire
by
Aaron Gleeman

04-29

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1

Raising Aces: Debut Ante: Jose Berrios
by
Doug Thorburn

04-19

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26

Rubbing Mud: Joe Mauer and Me
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-15

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0

What You Need to Know: Nobody Is 0-21, Yet
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-07

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7

Prospectus Feature: Can the Twins Sweep ROY Voting, Still Lose?
by
Bryan Grosnick

03-30

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0

Rumor Roundup: Who Will Save The Phillies' 55ish Wins This Year?
by
Emma Baccellieri

03-02

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13

Outta Left Field: The Remarkable Buxton Projection
by
Dustin Palmateer

02-29

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4

Winter Is Leaving
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-17

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6

Prospectus Feature: The Way-Too-Early Baseball Awards Breakdown
by
Bryan Grosnick

01-05

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2

Rubbing Mud: Kyle Gibson's Encouraging Comp, and Kyle Gibson's Really Encouraging Comp
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-22

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8

Rubbing Mud: Same Old Twins
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-04

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0

Transaction Analysis: Park-Life
by
Bret Sayre

11-11

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8

Rubbing Mud: The Great Big Exasperated AL Central Shrug
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-02

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0

What You Need to Know: Wild!
by
Chris Mosch

09-18

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4

Rubbing Mud: The Twins vs the Universe
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-24

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4

Rubbing Mud: Trading Trevor Plouffe
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-01

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11

Rubbing Mud: OMG Twinsies
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-08

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2

What You Need to Know: Smoked!
by
Daniel Rathman

05-05

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6

The Call-Up: Eddie Rosario
by
Christopher Crawford and Craig Goldstein

05-01

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6

What You Need to Know: Sold!
by
Chris Mosch

04-10

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0

BP Unfiltered: The Best Part of the Twins Season So Far
by
Zachary Levine

04-03

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27

Rubbing Mud: Four Good Young PItchers, Four Unusual Situations
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-27

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7

Every Team's Moneyball: Minnesota Twins: Rebuilding in Plain View
by
Ken Funck

03-26

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6

Transaction Analysis: It's Olivera Now, Baby Blue
by
R.J. Anderson

03-13

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11

Rubbing Mud: How the Twins Discovered Moneyball 10 Years Too Late
by
Matthew Trueblood

02-17

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26

2015 Prospects: 2015 Organizational Rankings
by
Mark Anderson, Jeff Moore and BP Prospect Staff

02-09

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149

2015 Prospects: Top 101 Prospects of 2015
by
Nick J. Faleris, Chris Mellen and BP Prospect Staff

01-09

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32

2015 Prospects: Minnesota Twins Top 10 Prospects
by
Chris Mellen and BP Prospect Staff

12-23

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3

Transaction Analysis: Gently Hughes'd
by
R.J. Anderson

12-12

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6

Transaction Analysis: Santana and Morales, One Year Later
by
Sam Miller

12-03

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2

Transaction Analysis: The Surprisingly High Price of Nostalgia
by
Sahadev Sharma and Nick Shlain

11-05

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3

Transaction Analysis: Lind Blows Out of Toronto
by
R.J. Anderson and Mike Gianella

10-29

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3

Fantasy Team Preview: Minnesota Twins
by
Mike Gianella

10-01

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0

Transaction Analysis: Playing a Hinch
by
R.J. Anderson

08-22

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6

Painting the Black: A Marlins Fastball, A Twins Approach
by
R.J. Anderson

08-05

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6

Transaction Analysis: The Reasonable Overpay of Kurt Suzuki
by
R.J. Anderson

07-31

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7

Transaction Analysis: A's hire A's
by
R.J. Anderson, Bret Sayre and Ben Carsley

07-25

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3

Transaction Analysis: Kendrys Redux
by
R.J. Anderson and Bret Sayre

07-11

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0

BP Announcements: Job Opening: Minnesota Twins Developer
by
Baseball Prospectus

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The Twins finally change course, firing longtime GM Terry Ryan and perhaps setting the club up for its first real philosophical change in decades.

In a move that’s somehow simultaneously a long time coming and shocking, the Twins fired Terry Ryan after two stints and 18 total years as general manager. Ryan’s teams won four division titles in five years from 2002-2006, but that success was limited to the regular season and bookended by ineptitude. Overall with Ryan as GM the Twins had a .474 winning percentage and were 149 games below .500, including a 318-421 (.430) record in his second stint. Their lone postseason series win under Ryan was 15 years ago and they haven’t won a playoff game in 13 years.

Few, if any, teams would have stuck with a GM for that long given the limited amount of winning amid 11 losing seasons in 18 years, but for better or worse Ryan—old school, conservative, loyal, and ultimately not all that successful—has represented everything about the Minnesota Twins for two decades. In firing Ryan the Twins named his longtime right-hand man Rob Antony as interim GM and it speaks to the culture of inertia and in-house loyalty that there’s legitimate reason to worry he may given the full-time job after 30 years in the organization.

At the very least Antony is now tasked with making several key decisions about veteran players leading up to the July 31 trade deadline. Ryan spent the past month saying repeatedly that he planned to be active at the deadline, uncharacteristically making public pronouncements about how the Twins couldn’t afford to stand pat when they’ve typically done just that in recent years. His departure two weeks before the deadline raises eyebrows, as does putting an interim GM in position to immediately make significant trades.

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The Twins are uncharacteristically vowing to be sellers this July. Makes it easier to say 'so long' when these are the parts you have to sell.

The first half was a mess for the Twins.

Offseason optimism that followed last year’s surprising climb over .500 gave way to a 0-9 start, and any notion of contending for the division title (or even a wild card spot) all but vanished by the end of April. Their record is an AL-worst 32-56, which just narrowly avoids the worst mark through 88 games in team history and makes a fifth 90-loss season in the past six years inevitable. Pitching continues to be a disaster, as the Twins have again allowed the league’s most runs after ranking dead last in ERA from 2011-2015, and the young lineup that was supposed to be a strength has instead scored the league’s 10th-most runs.

There’s no saving this season, and the stink of 95-100 losses would make it difficult to believe in the Twins’ ability to bounce back as contenders next year, which would be Year Seven of a rebuilding process that started with a collapse in 2011. However, the second half is crucial for the Twins as they try to figure out exactly where the franchise is headed and whether longtime but increasingly ineffective general manager Terry Ryan should be the one leading them there. There are a dozen veterans who conceivably could be moved by the trade deadline, and at least as many prospects who need roster spots and playing time to be evaluated for 2017 and beyond.

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Hold fast to dreams, For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird, That cannot fly.

By the end of the season my Out-Of-Nowhere All-Stars may look more like Small-Sample-Size All-Stars or Impending-Regression All-Stars, but such is life evaluating players based on the first half. My goal here is pretty simple: Identify the players at each position with the best first halves and the lowest expectations. That’s admittedly subjective and leaves out some actual All-Stars who surprised, but my focus is on role players, waiver claims, journeymen, non-prospects, trade throw-ins, and after-thoughts doing great work for the first time.

Catcher: Chris Herrmann, Arizona Diamondbacks
PECOTA 90th Percentile OPS: .757 | First-Half OPS: .864

While in the Twins’ farm system, Herrmann was viewed as a marginal prospect because his bat wasn’t good enough for him to be a regular corner outfielder and his glove wasn’t good enough for him to be a regular catcher. Sold separately a bad-hitting corner outfielder and a bad-fielding catcher have little value, but when combined the Twins liked Herrmann enough to give him nearly 400 plate appearances from 2012-2015. He was awful, hitting .181/.249/.280 for a .529 OPS that ranked dead last among all big leaguers with at least 350 plate appearances during that time. He also wasn’t much better in the minors, hitting .261/.336/.391 in 152 games at Triple-A.

When the Twins traded Herrmann in November it seemed shocking that they were able to snag anything resembling a decent prospect in return. That prospect, Triple-A outfielder Daniel Palka, currently has the second-most homers in the minor leagues, but Herrmann halted most mockery of the trade by hitting .291/.353/.511 in 52 games for Arizona. His defensive numbers still aren’t pretty, but he’s started 28 games as a catcher along with seeing time in all three outfield spots. Wilson Ramos, another ex-Twins prospect who made the actual All-Star team for the Nationals, is the only big-league catcher with at least 150 plate appearances and a higher OPS.


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The Cubs' pitchers are on a historical DRA-beating pace. Are there some factors that explain why some teams do this?

I’m certainly not the first person, and maybe not even the first person whom you’ve read today, to point out that the Cubs are having an incredible season. As of the moment this sentence is being written, their third-order winning percentage is an insane 0.750, and they sit in first place on both the batting and overall WARP leaderboard (and in fourth on the pitching one). As was pointed out by Rob Arthur and Ben Lindbergh at FiveThirtyEight last week, their pitching staff’s BABIP allowed is historically low. They also are among the best all-time in outperforming their DRA, the best pitching skills estimator currently available.

It was even more extreme a few days ago, but as of Friday evening the Cubs’ RA9-DRA was -0.95—almost a full run difference over nine innings. That’s the 12th-biggest difference in the entirety of what you might call the “DRA era,” which begins in the early 1950s. Also of note, both their DRA and RA9 are lower than any team above them on that list.

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In April, Joe Mauer (and his sunglasses) looked as good as ever. In May, he fell back. Each month promises a very different legacy for the lifelong Twin.

On Sunday, here at Baseball Prospectus, Meg Rowley wrote a terrific piece about what it's like to be a Mariners fan—specifically a Felix fan—in the later stages of the King's career. Speaking of aging superstars, she wrote “Every franchise has one, because every franchise is peopled by players who age,” and of course she’s right. As a lifelong Twins fan who was 6 years old when they won the ’91 Series (and who could recite the entire 25-man roster of the ’87 team by number as a 2-year-old, according to my dad), I first went through this special kind of grief with Kirby Puckett. Of course, that wasn’t exactly the same situation, as Puckett’s career was derailed by acute and unexpected/bizarre injuries rather than a slow decline, but the hope—hope of recovery from the broken jaw, hope that the vision problems weren’t serious—is the same, I think.

Now the next generation of Twins fans is going through this process with Joe Mauer, and it falls somewhere between the Felix decline and the Puckett abrupt end. Although it may have begun to some degree in 2011, when he hit the 60-day disabled list for now-infamous-among-Twins-fans “bilateral leg weakness,” the defining late-career moment for Mauer is of course the concussion he experienced on August 20th, 2013, which ended his season and forced a move away from catching much earlier in his career than expected.

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In a lost season, getting Byron Buxton settled in and ready to be a long-term asset is the most important goal for the next four months.

Twins general manager Terry Ryan admitted to calling up Byron Buxton too early last season, saying he regretted promoting the 21-year-old top prospect in June when injuries left Minnesota short-handed in the outfield. Buxton was overmatched in his first taste of the big leagues, hitting .209/.250/.326 with a 44/6 K/BB ratio in 46 games after arriving with the most hype of any Twins prospect since Joe Mauer in 2004.

Because of his poor debut and Ryan’s comments, most Minnesotans went into the offseason assuming Buxton would begin 2016 in the minors. Instead the Twins traded their best in-house center-field option, Aaron Hicks, and brought in no outside alternatives. Buxton arrived at spring training with essentially zero competition and won the starting job by default. He was the Opening Day center fielder at age 22, but three weeks and 17 games later the Twins demoted him back to Triple-A.

Nothing about Buxton’s performance suggested he was ready to thrive in the big leagues, and in fact, aside from flashing excellent range defensively he was pretty much a mess. However, the Twins calling him up “too early” in 2015 only to hand him the 2016 job without any competition and then change their minds 49 plate appearances later showed that Ryan and company are capable of being equally messy. Buxton has struggled and struggled mightily through his first 63 games, but the Twins also didn’t help much and that’s become a player development pattern.

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Don't forget how great Joe Nathan was. And as he prepares for a comeback, don't forget what he's still working toward.

The last big-league pitch Joe Nathan threw was an 86 mph, 1-2 slider to Torii Hunter on Opening Day of last season. Hunter checked his swing, got rung up by umpire Joe West for a game-ending strikeout, and argued his way into a meaningless ejection (followed by several days of the usual “Joe West is the worst” headlines). Detroit beat Minnesota, Nathan got his 377th career save, and two days later he was placed on the disabled list with an elbow injury that eventually required Tommy John surgery.

It was the second Tommy John surgery and third major arm surgery of Nathan’s career and at age 41 it seemed like the end of the line for the six-time All-Star closer, with a headline-grabbing one-out save against his former team and former teammate serving as a memorable final act. Instead, he rested and rehabbed, and last week Nathan signed a major-league contract with the Cubs that includes a spot on the 60-day disabled list until he’s ready to pitch again. As of now he’s aiming for early July.

Nathan wasn’t great for the Tigers before blowing out his elbow—posting a 4.78 ERA and 55/29 K/BB ratio in 58 innings—but having closely watched his entire Twins career it’s my duty to remind everyone of how great he was for a long time in Minnesota and later in Texas. Nathan at his best was as dominant as nearly any reliever in baseball history, and Nathan was at his best a lot. For instance, here’s a list of the pitchers since 1920 with the most seasons in which they threw at least 50 innings and posted an ERA below 2.00:

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One challenge of replacing a GM is unwinding an entire front office during the permanent campaign of modern baseball.

Let’s say, for just a moment, that the Twins decided to fire Terry Ryan sometime this month. That’s a reasonable suspicion, at the very least. Truthfully, if the team hasn’t arrived at the conclusion that it’s time to fire Ryan and clear out a front office populated by many of the same people who were there 20 years ago, they’re never getting there. Nothing more can be done. They’re 11-31, as I type this, and there is absolutely no sign that things will turn around. Even if there were, it would be too late for this season. Twins fans must wait at least one more season to see the team truly pull out of their rebuild, a project they undertook only after a catastrophic season forced them in that direction, and one the team tried to declare a success much too soon. John Schuerholz probably thinks Ryan’s leash has been surprisingly long. The makers of Grey’s Anatomy think it’s time for the front office to step aside and make room for a new project. Franklin D. Roosevelt thinks there’s value in more leadership turnover than this. So let’s just assume the Twins see that, too.

If that’s true, obviously, you shouldn’t be surprised that the decision hasn’t been translated into action. This is a good time of year for managerial firings, but an untenable one for front-office shuffling. First of all, there’s the draft, coming up in just a few weeks. It’s way, way too late to displace anyone ahead of that. The scouts have largely made their reports, and there wouldn’t be time to go in a different direction. It would be a very bad idea to bring in someone new at the leadership level to make decisions based on their predecessor’s gathered intelligence.

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Putting the Twins' top pitching prospect's disaster start in perspective.

Monday night I tuned into the Twins-Tigers game, in part because I'm a glutton for punishment with a Pavlovian need to watch Twins games no matter how bad things get, but also because top prospect Jose Berrios was making his fourth career start. I was excited, or at least as excited as baseball fans in Minnesota get these days. Berrios' first three starts weren't great, but his previous outing was encouraging enough to make me think perhaps the 21-year-old former first-round pick was ready to become a full-time member of the rotation for the next decade or so.

He wasn't. Actually, whatever the opposite of that is, he was ready to do that and only that. Berrios failed to make it out of the first inning, recording two outs while allowing seven runs. First-inning knockouts have always fascinated me. It’s like showing up to your office, spilling coffee down the front of your shirt, slipping and falling on the wet floor beneath you, knocking over a filing cabinet in the process, and then being asked to go home by your boss. Not only did you embarrass yourself in front of co-workers, now they’re all watching you exit in shame. It’s made even worse by knowing that everyone else has to keep working for the rest of the day.

Twins manager Paul Molitor came out to remove Berrios following a bases-loaded double by light-hitting shortstop Jose Iglesias, and their limited interaction had a "put him out of his misery" vibe. Shortly after the game--which the Twins came back to tie at 8-8 before losing, thus providing their fans with the maximum possible pain--Berrios was demoted to Triple-A. There he joins fellow top prospect Byron Buxton, who began the season as the Twins' starting center fielder before being demoted to Triple-A three weeks later after hitting .156 in 17 games.

Buxton ranked No. 2 overall on our top-101 prospect list and Berrios was No. 17, so in addition to all the losing happening in Minnesota it's getting increasingly difficult to convince people here that prospects are worth believing in. I'm still a big believer in Berrios (and Buxton too), but his disastrous start Monday did give me some pause, in that it got me wondering how often a prospect as young and as highly touted as Berrios has ever been that helpless on a mound. My hope was that it actually happens quite a bit, and better yet happens quite a bit to prospects who go on to become amazing pitchers. But... well, it doesn't.

Here's the complete list of pitchers since 1995 who've been knocked out of a start in the first inning while allowing seven or more runs before turning 22 years old:

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Atlana has odd timing in firing Fredi Gonzalez, Francisco Cervelli shows how much he loves Pittsburgh, and Tony Kemp arrives in Houston.

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It was a disaster for the Twins pitcher, just like down the road it was a disaster for the Blue Jays pitcher, J.A. Happ.

The Monday Takeaway
There were eight major-league games played yesterday, and half of them featured a team scoring double-digit runs. Only one of them chased the opposing starter in the first inning, though, and that same team’s skipper was gone by the fourth. That’s ample reason to begin this recap in Detroit, where there was a whole lot offense accompanied by a whole lot of ugly on Monday night.

Jose Berrios took the hill in the last of the first and figured, “Ah, I’ll just groove a fastball for strike one.” Little did he know that Ian Kinsler was locked, loaded, and ready to fire:


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Can anybody in 2016 identify what the Twins are good at?

Twins general manager Terry Ryan is a Well-Respected Baseball Man™.

He was drafted by the Twins in 1972 and pitched four seasons in their farm system. From there he became a scout and, eventually, the Twins' scouting director. In the fall of 1994, when two-time World Series-winning general manager Andy MacPhail left the Twins to take the same job with the Cubs, the team chose Ryan as his replacement. He's been the Twins' general manager for 18 total seasons split between two stints, separated by a self-imposed four-season hiatus. Terry Ryan is the Minnesota Twins.

That cliché about someone who has forgotten more about something than most people will ever know is absolutely true of Ryan, a 62-year-old baseball lifer who has earned universal respect from his peers in baseball and from the media covering baseball. All of that is undeniable. However, also undeniable is that Ryan's overall winning percentage as Twins general manager is just .474; the team has won a grand total of one playoff series since 1995. They haven't won a playoff game since 2004, and the Twins have the second-worst record in baseball during Ryan's second stint, with a fifth 90-loss season in the past six years currently looking likely following a disastrous 10-27 start.

When the Twins were winning six AL Central titles in nine years from 2002-2010 they were known for remaining old school as MLB front offices increasingly went new school. Basically they were known for being Terry Ryan, continuing to rely on their scouting chops and well-established organizational approach as waves of analytics and innovation swirled around them. All of that remains true now, except the Twins have fallen even further behind in the various new-school categories while failing to dominate on the old-school side like they used to. In short, it's not obvious what they're even good at relative to the other 29 teams anymore.

It's been quite a while since Ryan's actual moves and the Twins' actual record matched his sterling reputation. There aren't many teams that would stick with a GM for two decades of .474 baseball and zero playoff success. There aren't many markets in which that GM and his longtime front office assistants would receive little criticism and tons of praise for producing 11 losing seasons in 18 years. But the Twins and Minnesota are that rare combination, which is why this preamble seems somehow necessary just to get to a point where it feels comfortable to say ... well, it's no longer clear that Terry Ryan should be the Twins' general manager.

Ryan is extraordinarily conservative, which has shown itself in his aversion to spending big money on outside free agents and in several seasons deciding to flat-out leave $10 million or more in projected, ownership-approved payroll unspent. He's targeted mid-level, low-upside veterans in free agency rather than going after bigger fish, most recently spending $200 million on the meh-worthy pitching quintet of Ricky Nolasco, Ervin Santana, Phil Hughes, Mike Pelfrey, and Kevin Correia. Those five free agent additions have combined to give the Twins a 4.60 ERA in 1,435 innings; three of the contracts stretch beyond this season.

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