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Articles Tagged Mike Scioscia 

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05-22

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1

Rubbing Mud: The Muscle Memory of Bunting
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-22

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8

Players Prefer Presentation: Would You Like to Play a Game of Telephone?
by
Meg Rowley

01-12

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4

Pebble Hunting: The Scioscia About Face
by
Sam Miller

06-27

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0

The View from the Loge Level: The Evolution of Mike Scioscia
by
Daron Sutton

09-26

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5

Painting the Black: The Angels' Demons
by
R.J. Anderson

08-26

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32

Pebble Hunting: Five Myths About the Angels' Impending Shakeup
by
Sam Miller

04-16

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 182: How Much Will Mark Appel Make?/Is Mike Scioscia's Job Safe?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-08

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8

Punk Hits: So You've Decided to Join the American League
by
Ian Miller

09-12

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5

Pebble Hunting: The Mysterious Resurgence of Ervin Santana
by
Sam Miller

07-22

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4

BP Unfiltered: Ask From Your Heart: Tales From a Big League Press Availability
by
Sam Miller

06-22

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20

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Hate List, Part III
by
Jay Jaffe

05-01

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4

Western Front: As a Manager, He Makes a Good Right Fielder
by
Geoff Young

04-30

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10

Pebble Hunting: Jordan Walden and Small Samples
by
Sam Miller

04-16

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20

Overthinking It: Man in the Box
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-09

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24

The Stats Go Marching In: The Hidden Helpers of the Pitching Staff
by
Max Marchi

12-16

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Men Behind the Men Behind the Plate
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

10-03

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10

Pebble Hunting: Three Major-League Teams Interview Three Baseball Men for Job Openings
by
Sam Miller

06-03

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25

Baseball ProGUESTus: Can Baseball Expertise Be a Bad Thing?
by
Sam Miller

10-18

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Ron Roenicke
by
David Laurila

03-29

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Price of Contentment
by
Dan Fox

03-22

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Double Steals And More
by
Dan Fox

10-04

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0

Playoff Prospectus: New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
by
Christina Kahrl

04-12

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0

Transaction Analysis: March 29-April 4, 2005
by
Christina Kahrl

07-25

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0

Transaction Analysis: July 7-20
by
Christina Kahrl

04-09

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0

Transaction Analysis: March 25-April 6, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

10-28

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 14-27
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-16

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0

Internet Baseball Awards: Managers of the Year
by
Greg Spira

10-08

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Anaheim Angels vs. Minnesota Twins
by
Christina Kahrl

10-07

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Defending the Bandwagon
by
Jonah Keri

10-01

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Anaheim Angels vs. New York Yankees
by
Jeff Bower

11-07

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0

Staff Ballots
by
Baseball Prospectus

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April 30, 2012 3:00 am

Pebble Hunting: Jordan Walden and Small Samples

10

Sam Miller

What numbers do we look at when no number is large enough?

In 2011, the Angels began the season with Fernando Rodney as their closer. Oh, man, was Fernando Rodney bad at baseball a year ago. Rodney was the Angels’ closer, and he was also one of the worst relievers in baseball. He converted his first save, and he blew his second save, and he was replaced by Jordan Walden. Jordan Walden made the All-Star team. The Angels didn’t add a closer in the offseason. The Angels didn’t suggest any sort of closer controversy was brewing. The Angels didn't leave the issue of the ninth inning open-ended at all. Jordan Walden spent his winter chopping wood, shoveling snow, and quietly being the Angels’ closer. “What do you do?” people would ask him at parties. “Awwwww,” he would say, trying to be humble, because nobody likes a boaster, “I’m involved in recreation.” Pressed, he would acknowledge that he closed baseball games for the Angels. Women would casually touch his arm.

He saved his first game, and he blew his second game, and he was replaced by Scott Downs. Fernando Rodney is a closer, and Jordan Walden no longer is. That was very fast! One blown save. Four and a third total innings, and nine baserunners. If his season were a start, it would be Clayton Kershaw’s April 15 start. Very, very fast.

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Ben reports from the ballpark on Saturday's Yankees-Angels game and explains how and why he stopped worrying about working for a team and learned to love writing about baseball.

Here’s a theory of mine that may or may not be true: you can get almost anywhere in a ballpark as long as you’re wearing a lanyard. If you want journalistic access to a team, you could work hard for years, turning in clean copy on time and impressing your superiors until somebody sponsors you for season credentials or the BBWAA. Or you could skip all that, put on a good-looking lanyard, and try to look like you know where you’re going. Most people assume that anyone wearing one inside a stadium is supposed to be there.

I have my credentials, so I don’t have to fly casual and fake my way in. But I’m on my way to do something I’ve never done before, so I’m displaying my lanyard prominently and willing guards to look at it and let me pass. It’s Saturday afternoon in the Bronx, I’m standing outside Yankee Stadium, and I’m about to attend my first game as a member of the BBWAA.

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Was Mike Piazza one of the best defensive catchers ever? How does catcher defense age? What effect do managers have on their pitching staffs, and do former catchers really make the best skippers? And how good was Leo Mazzone, really?

The best pitcher handlers since 1948
As I promised a couple of weeks ago, I’m going to take a look at the catchers who were best at handling their pitching staffs going back to 1948, the first year for which sufficient Retrosheet data is available.

I won’t describe my methods again here, since you can look at my previous article if you need a refresher. Suffice it to say that a With-Or-Without-You approach has been used here, and that the effect of the pitcher, batter, ballpark, and defense has been removed in order to evaluate that of the catcher.


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What can Jeff Mathis and Mike Napoli tell us about the dangers of valuing backup catchers inappropriately?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jonathan Bernhardt is a freelance writer born in Baltimore who lives and works in New York City. He is an occasional contributor to the Et tu, Mr. Destructo? blog.

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Fake-filling vacancies in Anaheim, Chicago, and Boston.

The first:

Angels Stadium
11:15 a.m.
On a Tuesday. 



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Attempting to solve the central mystery of Mike Scioscia's managerial career--why Jeff Mathis gets so much playing time--and exploring its implications for how managers make up their minds.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Sam Miller writes about baseball for the Orange County Register. He covered local government, education and autism before moving to the sports section in 2009. He lives in Long Beach with his wife and newborn daughter, and you can follow him on Twitter at @sammillerocr

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A conversation with the Angels' bench coach about in-game tactics, baserunning as an Anaheim brand of baseball, and more.

An often overlooked role in baseball is that of the bench coach, and few do the job better than Ron Roenicke. Mike Scioscia's right-hand man for each of the past four seasons, the 53-year-old Roenicke assumed his current duties after having served as the Angels' third-base coach for six years, stepping in when Joe Maddon left to become the manager in Tampa Bay. Roenicke himself is a candidate for a managerial position, as the former minor league skipper is reportedly among those being considered to fill the vacancy in Cleveland. Roenicke talked about his responsibilities as a bench coach and shared some of his philosophies on the game when the Angels visited Fenway Park in mid-September.

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March 29, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: The Price of Contentment

0

Dan Fox

Dan looks at double steals from every conceivable angle, inspired by a wacky quadruple steal from the pages of Retrosheet.

"He told me the rule book doesn't specifically cover that situation. He said you've seen one of the most unusual plays in baseball."
--Official scorer Randy Minkoff, recounting his conversation with Seymour Siwoff about the Cardinals "quadruple steal" in August of 1985, as recorded by Retrosheet


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Two, two, two bags in one! How do managers employ this high-reward tactic?

--Cubs manager Lou Piniella showing his affection for the double steal

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Christina previews the Yankees/Angels series, who are perfectly poised to exploit each other's weaknesses.

Lineups (AVG/OBP/SLG/EqA/VORP)

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April 12, 2005 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: March 29-April 4, 2005

0

Christina Kahrl

Early-season moves have featured their share of funkiness, writes Chris Kahrl.

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July 25, 2003 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: July 7-20

0

Christina Kahrl

Bill Stoneman and Mike Scioscia get rewarded for 2002. The Indians and Rangers swap pitching prospect for hitting prospect. The Yankees grab Armando Benitez in a non-Sierran move. The Jays get a steal in Stewart-for-Kielty. These and other tidbits, plus a full array of Kahrlisms, in this edition of Transaction Analysis.

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