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Articles Tagged Mark Prior 

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12-10

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 345: Roy Halladay and Mark Prior Retire
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-18

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1

Pebble Hunting: Albert Pujols Walks Again, and Other Reflections on Earlier Articles
by
Sam Miller

05-25

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9

Raising Aces: Stras Wars
by
Doug Thorburn

05-18

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20

Raising Aces: All About Injuries
by
Doug Thorburn

03-26

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6

Pebble Hunting: Let's Play "Pick an Old or Injury-Prone Pitcher"
by
Sam Miller

03-07

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43

Prospectus Hit and Run: Inspecting the Spectrum, Part IV: The Designated Hitter Question
by
Jay Jaffe

09-10

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9

Workload Worries
by
Christina Kahrl

04-26

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Under The Knife: Prior Mayhem Makes a Long Wait Longer
by
Will Carroll

10-14

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Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-28

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Prospectus Game of the Week: Chicago Cubs @ Chicago White Sox, 6/26/05
by
Jonah Keri

10-28

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Internet Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

10-09

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Prospectus Today: Both Barrels Blazing
by
Joe Sheehan

10-08

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Lies, Damned Lies: Working Late
by
Nate Silver

09-30

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Playoff Prospectus: Atlanta Braves vs. Chicago Cubs
by
Nate Silver

07-15

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Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Greg Spira

07-01

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Prospectus Roundtable: Mark Prior and Pitch Counts
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-26

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Team Health Reports
by
Will Carroll

02-25

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Team Health Reports
by
Will Carroll

11-06

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The Daily Prospectus: It's a Dry Heat
by
Jonah Keri

08-05

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The Daily Prospectus: Flushing $32 Million
by
Joe Sheehan

05-24

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Transaction Analysis: May 20-22, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

03-27

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Transaction Analysis: March 19-25, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

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When the season begins each spring, the ivy on the outfield wall at Wrigley Field is not a lush green, but a vine-bare patch of brick and brown. Botany is not among my hobbies, and I do not know whether this condition results from some half-intentional negligence, or the natural distaste of Parthenocissus tricuspidata for the cool Midwestern spring. But in either event, the effect is unsettling: that feeling you get in a dream when you see a place familiar but vaguely and profoundly incomplete. That was the feeling I had on Friday night when I walked through Gate F at Clark and Addison Streets and into the nation's most beloved ballpark. Though the architecture of Wrigley Field is the same as always--an array of ascending ramps, chain-linked fences, city vistas, and dank inner concourses pierced by streaks of evening sunlight--the atmosphere is palpably different. Gone are the rowdies, the drunks, the tourists; present instead is the eerie timbre of quiet before battle. It is the playoffs, the third game of the first series against the Atlanta Braves, and whether owning to the somber, rainy weather, the melancholy brought on by raised expectations, or, more likely, the Trans-Atlantic airline fares that have passed as market rates for scalped tickets, these fans were here to win.

That was the feeling I had on Friday night when I walked through Gate F at Clark and Addison Streets and into the nation's most beloved ballpark. Though the architecture of Wrigley Field is the same as always--an array of ascending ramps, chain-linked fences, city vistas, and dank inner concourses pierced by streaks of evening sunlight--the atmosphere is palpably different. Gone are the rowdies, the drunks, the tourists; present instead is the eerie timbre of quiet before battle.

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September 30, 2003 12:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: Atlanta Braves vs. Chicago Cubs

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Nate Silver

Even as we enter October, it's strange to think of the Braves as a club that's led by their offense. Then again, I'm one of those people that was still writing "2002" on his checks until just a couple of weeks ago. But there's little doubt that Atlanta is a deep, superior offensive club. All eight Braves regulars have EqAs better than the league average (Fick and Castilla making it just under the wire). Nitpick away if you like: Lopez, as horribly as PECOTA mangled his projection, was almost certainly playing over his head a little bit. Fick had a an awful second half and has been flipped with Lopez in the batting order. Vinny Castilla is still Vinny Castilla. It doesn't matter: the Braves simply mash the ball (235 home runs), a skill that holds up perfectly well in high- and low-scoring games, against soft-tossers and power arms. Hell, even their pitchers can hit a little bit. What could matter more is that the Braves are overwhelmingly right-handed, and will be facing an overwhelmingly right-handed pitching staff. Too much can be made of the platoon advantage; Sheffield, for example, has never had a huge split; and Giles actually hit righties better this year. But as a team, the Braves were about 25 points worth of OPS better against lefties this year, and we're at the stage where those little things can make a difference. The Cubs' offense, to borrow the old line, runs a lot like CTA buses: nothing at all for a long time, and then a bunch all at once. Well, that's not quite right; the Cubs didn't exhibit any particularly unusual patterns in their run scoring. But theirs is an offense that has its holes, especially in the bottom four slots in the order.

(With apologies to William Carlos Williams.)

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The BP Staff weighs in with their mid-season ballots, showing who they think deserves an MVP, Cy Young Award, and Rookie of the Year.

The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with occasional comments, are included below the awards standings.

Hitters: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (Avg/OBP/SLG/RARP/VORP)
Pitchers: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (ERA, IP, SNWAR or ARP, VORP)

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July 1, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Roundtable: Mark Prior and Pitch Counts

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Baseball Prospectus

When Dusty Baker allowed Mark Prior to throw 126 pitches last Thursday against the Brewers, it was the final straw for Gary Huckabay. Huckabay threw in the towel and Prior with it, trading him straight up for Austin Kearns in a 24-team Scoresheet Baseball league. The deal inspired some discussion among the Baseball Prospectus staff.

Gary Huckabay: For the record, I ran screaming from Mark Prior yesterday, trading him away in BL-DwMurphy. I couldn't handle the risk. I'll take Austin Kearns and bet on my remaining arms.

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February 26, 2003 12:00 am

Team Health Reports

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Will Carroll

Of the million things Cubs fans can blame when they look back on why 2003 wasn't the year they finally won the World Series, health won't be one of them. In fact, for at least the last decade, trainer Dave Tumbas has kept Cubs' health concerns out of the picture more than most teams in baseball. The one major injury during that time was Kerry Wood's arm trouble; but as much as people look to Wood's usage during his rookie season, the more likely culprit was his usage during high school. As far as the rest of the team, the injuries suffered have been setbacks they could expect and plan for. It's fine to have someone like Moises Alou or Rondell White on the roster if there's an adequate backup plan. The difference between the Cubs with Alou and the Brewers with Jeffrey Hammonds is that not only do the Cubs plan on Alou playing only 120 games, they paid him according to this plan.

Projected Lineup

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February 25, 2003 12:00 am

Team Health Reports

0

Will Carroll

Of the million things Cubs fans can blame when they look back on why 2003 wasn't the year they finally won the World Series, health won't be one of them. In fact, for at least the last decade, trainer Dave Tumbas has kept Cubs' health concerns out of the picture more than most teams in baseball. The one major injury during that time was Kerry Wood's arm trouble; but as much as people look to Wood's usage during his rookie season, the more likely culprit was his usage during high school. As far as the rest of the team, the injuries suffered have been setbacks they could expect and plan for. It's fine to have someone like Moises Alou or Rondell White on the roster if there's an adequate backup plan. The difference between the Cubs with Alou and the Brewers with Jeffrey Hammonds is that not only do the Cubs plan on Alou playing only 120 games, they paid him according to this plan.

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Mark Teixeira's for real. OK, you probably didn't me to tell you that. The Rangers' superstar third base prospect has terrorized pitchers every step of his amateur and pro careers. But did you know Adam Morrissey has one of the quickest swings you'll ever see? That Kevin Cash's defense may be even better than you've heard? That Luke Hudson could help push the Reds to the top of the NL Central in 2003? You would if you headed out to Phoenix for the Arizona Fall League season.

Mark Teixeira's for real. OK, you probably didn't me to tell you that. The Rangers' superstar third base prospect has terrorized pitchers every step of his amateur and pro careers.

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Mark Prior threw 135 pitches yesterday. It was worth it, though, because it pulled the Cubs to within 12 1/2 games of first place in the NL Central and to within 14 games of the Dodgers in the wild-card race. Look, I've made this argument before, so I'm not going to waste a column on it again today. Letting your nominal franchise pitcher throw 135 pitches in a meaningless game is inconsistent with any kind of plan for success. Letting him bat in the bottom of the eighth having thrown 119 pitches is grounds for firing.

Mark Prior threw 135 pitches yesterday. It was worth it, though, because it pulled the Cubs to within 12 1/2 games of first place in the NL Central and to within 14 games of the Dodgers in the wild-card race.

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May 24, 2002 11:17 am

Transaction Analysis: May 20-22, 2002

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Christina Kahrl

Nevertheless, in the wake of the most bizarre deal we've seen in a very long time, I couldn't help myself; I peeked around. Now, I have a lot of respect for Rob Neyer, and for Rob's work. As a fellow product of the analysis revolution of the '80s, I suspect we share a basic philosophy of trying to inject some element of quantitative analysis to provide better qualitative commentary. That said, I think any attempt to quantitatively assess the trade of Jeremy Giambi--regardless of your opinion of Win Shares and their utility--ignores two basic problems.

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March 27, 2002 4:52 pm

Transaction Analysis: March 19-25, 2002

0

Christina Kahrl

A recap of transactions in the last week featuring all 30 teams.

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