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Articles Tagged Los Angeles Dodgers 

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06-29

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Outta Left Field: Have the Dodgers Solved Injuries Or Are They Just Chatty?
by
Dustin Palmateer

06-21

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Transaction Analysis: The St. Louis Outfield Shuffle
by
Grant Jones, Christopher Crawford and Bryan Grosnick

06-15

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BP Unfiltered: Clayton Kershaw Should Have, Like, Three Walks Allowed This Year
by
Sam Miller

06-14

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What You Need to Know: Near-Max Effort
by
Daniel Rathman

06-14

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3

Prospectus Feature: 365 Days of a Shortstop Revolution
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-13

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14

Prospectus Feature: Groundball Pitchers: Nothin' To Do With Them?
by
Rob Mains

06-08

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What You Need to Know: Tough Guys Tough
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-07

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Pebble Hunting: Clayton Kershaw's 'Mistakes', Chapter Two
by
Sam Miller

06-06

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What You Need to Know: It Won't Always Be Like This
by
Ashley Varela

06-06

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3

Transaction Analysis: Escape From L.A.
by
Bryan Grosnick and Brendan Gawlowski

06-03

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What You Need to Know: Don't Know What the Hurry Is
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-03

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Transaction Analysis: Just A Guy(s)
by
Bryan Grosnick

06-02

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Transaction Analysis: Walsh Revolution
by
Rian Watt, James Fegan and Matthew Trueblood

05-31

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Raising Aces: Debut Ante: Julio Urias
by
Doug Thorburn

05-26

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Life at the Margins: The Giants Have Had a Good Week
by
Rian Watt

05-24

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What You Need to Know: About That Kershaw Walk...
by
Nicolas Stellini

05-18

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19

Rubbing Mud: Babies, Bathwater, and the Pace Of Play Conundrum
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-18

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What You Need to Know: We Can Beat Rizzo, For Just One Day
by
Emma Baccellieri

05-13

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What You Need to Know: 77 Strikeouts, 4 Walks
by
Emma Baccellieri

05-13

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Raising Aces: The Velo Movers, One Year Later
by
Doug Thorburn

05-13

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5

Life at the Margins: Swing, Batta Batta
by
Rian Watt

05-11

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2

What You Need to Know: I Have Seen The Royals, And That Team Last Night Was Not The Royals
by
Nicolas Stellini

05-02

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What You Need to Know: Zimmermann Dealin'
by
Ashley Varela

04-29

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Prospectus Q&A: Gabe Kapler, Dodgers Player Development Director
by
Wilson Karaman

04-29

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Prospectus Feature: Goodbye, April: You Are Not Special
by
Rob Mains

04-25

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Life at the Margins: The Best Pitcher Right Now
by
Rian Watt

04-25

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What You Need to Know: FernandoMaedaia?
by
Ashley Varela

04-22

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What You Need to Know: Arrieta's Masterpiece, Kershaw's Accident
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-15

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4

BP Unfiltered: The Wonderful Things That Vin Scully Might Lead You To Think About
by
Meg Rowley

04-11

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8

Rubbing Mud: Kill the Error
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-11

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What You Need to Know: The Fella's Last Name Is Story
by
Ashley Varela

04-07

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Rubbing Mud: Juan Nicasio Is Not A Miracle Yet
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-01

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Winter Is Leaving
by
Wilson Karaman

03-22

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Rumor Roundup: Dodgers Consider Their Options, e.g. Zach Lee
by
Daniel Rathman

03-04

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5

Tools of Ignorance: The Dodgers' Breakable Rotation
by
Jeff Quinton

03-03

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Rumor Roundup: Blue Jays Get Extendy
by
Demetrius Bell

02-19

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Fifth Column: How to Project Julio Urias
by
Michael Baumann

02-17

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6

Prospectus Feature: The Way-Too-Early Baseball Awards Breakdown
by
Bryan Grosnick

02-12

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BP Unfiltered: Glenn Burke, Historically Significant Baserunner
by
Sam Miller

02-12

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22

Fifth Column: The Death of Nostalgia in Baseball Broadcasting
by
Michael Baumann

02-03

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6

Life at the Margins: The Case Against Hiring A Smart Person
by
Rian Watt

01-22

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4

BP Unfiltered: How Greinke vs. Arrieta vs. Kershaw Played Out
by
Tom Tango

01-11

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Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Kenta Maeda
by
Doug Thorburn

01-04

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5

Transaction Analysis: Maybe They're Not Maeda Money
by
Bryan Grosnick and Bret Sayre

12-29

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2

Rumor Roundup: Yo Back to Motown?
by
Daniel Rathman

12-22

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Rumor Roundup: On the Dodgers' No. 2 Starter
by
Daniel Rathman

12-21

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Transaction Analysis: The Return of the Bear
by
Meg Rowley

12-10

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Pitching Backward: The Real-Life Closer Report
by
Jeff Long

12-09

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Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Jeff Samardzija and Hisashi Iwakuma
by
Doug Thorburn

12-08

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6

Baseball Therapy: Fiddlesticks, Yeah!
by
Russell A. Carleton

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Colin Walsh picked the wrong time to draw walks, Edwin Jackson's out-making ability vanished, and Alex Guerrero bit off more than he could chew.

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The box score won't tell you this, but Julio Urias justified the hype in his debut.

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The improbably predictable Giants.

The Giants won yesterday, 4-3 in extra innings against the Padres, and even before they did, they had the best week of any team in baseball. By BP’s own reckoning, in the form of our Playoff Odds report, their chances of making a postseason appearance this year increased by the largest amount—17.0 percent—of any other team this week, and that’s before the system had a chance to consider Brandon Crawford’s walkoff single by the bay last night. When it does, their odds of tasting October in this, an even year, will go up further, not only because the Padres are a division rival but because, as well, the season is one day closer to its end.

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Clayton Kershaw is peaking, Pujols hits a sort of a milestone, and the Cubs are slumping, relatively speaking.

The Monday Takeaway
The Warriors are actually bad at basketball, as they take too many jump shots and don’t have a strong enough game in the post. Their once-in-a-lifetime shooter is overrated, and their records mean nothing in the face of grit and Russell Westbrook.


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Why our changing expectations are driving us all insane.

Pace of game (or time of game? It’s so unclear which problem the various hand-wringers want to solve, and there’s imperfect overlap when it comes to the solutions to each) is in the news again. The average length of an MLB game this season is three hours, some seven minutes longer than at the same point last season. This, everyone seems to agree, is a problem.

On Monday night, before I saw the Rob Manfred quotes that made it clear this would be a major topic of discussion this week, I sat on my couch, sorting socks and watching the Dodgers play the Angels. It was already past 11:30 Central time when I turned on the game, so I was mildly surprised to find that the top of the seventh inning was just beginning. Apparently, though, I had missed the quick part of the game. Pedro Baez was on the mound for the Dodgers, and pretty quickly, he began laboring. That’s not new. Of the 355 pitchers who have thrown at least 10 innings this season, Baez takes longer between pitches (an even 30 seconds) than all but two. The issue was particularly pronounced on Monday, though, because Baez was really up against it.

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Chase Anderson (almost) shuts down the Cubs, Scherzer vs. Syndergaard lives up to the billing, and Kershaw vs. Trout lives up to Kershaw.

The Tuesday Takeaway
Milwaukee’s pitching has offered little excitement this year (except, perhaps, excitement about the fact that the Reds exist, which allows the Brewers to be second to last for most pitching stats instead of the worst in baseball). The Cubs’ hitting, on the other hand, has offered excitement near nonstop. And because baseball is weird, when the two met Tuesday night, the excitement was all Milwaukee’s—though the Cubs did their best to spoil that up until the very end.


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Clayton Kershaw is really doing something, David Price finds his feel again, and Chase Headley finally finds second base.

The Thursday Takeaway
Bartolo Colon took the mound Thursday for the first time since the beauty of his historic first home run last week. But any lingering bliss was quick to evaporate, as the Dodgers piled on for a four-run first inning anchored by a Yasmani Grandal home run. It was quickly made clear that Thursday’s spotlight would belong to the game’s other starting pitcher: one Clayton Kershaw.


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Revisiting last year's biggest velocity changes, because change is just another word for regression to come.

Every year, I write a pair of articles that breaks down the risers and fallers in pitch velocity, specifically targeting multi-year trends to look for any changes in baseline stuff. With all of the talk about pitchers who have lost a tick (or three) of velo, it seemed appropriate to revisit the movers and shakers to see if the changes in pitch speed have carried over thus far in 2016.

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Fact-checking Farhan.

Let me begin by saying this: this was not my idea. Last Friday, I attended a talk at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology given by Farhan Zaidi, formerly the AGM in Oakland and currently the GM of the Dodgers. (He’s one of many.) During the course of his talk, Zaidi highlighted the phenomenon I’m about to describe—among others—as an example of intriguing applications of economic theory to baseball analysis. He credited this particular discovery (if that is, indeed, the correct term) to his in-house R&D team. So, credit goes to you, anonymous L.A. baseball ops staffer. I’m sorry I don’t know your name.

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Kansas City's slow start, plus: Yes to Trayce Thompson, yay J.A. Happ, and way to be Dae-Ho Lee

The Tuesday Takeaway
Close your eyes and think of the Royals. There has perhaps been no more unique team over the past two years. They’ve won in a way that was at first foreign, and—seemingly, at times—illogical. The long ball isn’t the weapon of choice here; rather, they wield defense, a never-ending procession of elite relievers, and Ned Yost’s gut. Close your eyes and think of the Royals. You see Wade Davis. You see Alcides Escobar and his sub-.300 OBP leading off. You see Salvador Perez poking the ball under Josh Donaldson’s glove down the left field line. You see Omar Infante running rampant in the All-Star voting. It feels unconventional, but it feels right. There’s something magical about what they have done and what they have been. Something that makes the corners of your mouth curl up and forces a chuckle out of your throat.


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Marcus Stroman has a happy birthday, Clayton Kershaw continues to pitch in a class of his own, and Trevor Story finds another way to write himself into the history books.

The Weekend Takeaway
Talent and luck rarely keep the same company, but they found a mutual friend in Jordan Zimmermann on Saturday afternoon. The Tigers’ right-hander polished his ERA to a shiny 0.55 mark with another pristine outing against the Twins, striking out seven in his fifth consecutive win and going seven innings without issuing a walk for the first time since July 22, 2015.


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What did we learn about various players and teams this month? Less than we'll learn in the next one.

Early season baseball is full of articles about “What we’ve learned so far” after a week, or two weeks, or a month of play. You can’t really blame the sportswriters and TV sports producers and podcast hosts who come up with these pieces. They have to talk about something, and there aren’t any pennant races or awards competitions to discuss in April.

As Russell Carleton has demonstrated, though, most measures of baseball performance take far longer than a week or three to stabilize. Drawing conclusions from a 10- or 20-game sample is akin to statistics problem sets involving drawing balls from an urn. A really, really big urn. With lots and lots of balls in it. When you draw a few balls from a really, really big urn with lots and lots of balls in it, you don’t get a good picture of what’s really in the urn.

But how useless are April statistics? Are they worse than those from other months? On one hand, last April Andrew McCutchen batted .194/.302/.333 and Jose Iglesias batted .377/.427/.536. Jon Lester had a 6.23 ERA while Ubaldo Jimenez’s was 1.59. Those weren't particularly durable figures. On the other hand Dallas Keuchel’s 0.73 April ERA and Josh Donaldson’s .319/.370/.549 April batting line were.

We can look at the relevance of April numbers by correlating them to players’ full-year figures, and comparing the correlation in April to that of May, June, July, August, and September. (Throughout this analysis, April includes a few days of March play in the relevant years, and September includes a few days of October games.) To do this, I selected batting title and ERA qualifiers from each of the past 10 seasons and compared their monthly results to their full-year results. I had a sample of 1,487 batter seasons with corresponding monthly data in about 87 percent of months and 850 pitcher seasons with corresponding monthly data in 86 percent of months.

Admittedly, there’s a selection bias in April data, and it applies mostly to young players. Since I’m comparing monthly data to full-year data for batting title and ERA qualifiers, I’m selecting from those players who hung around long enough to compile 502 plate appearances or 162 innings pitched. If you’re a young player who puts up a .298/.461/.596 batting line in April, as Joc Pederson did last April, you get to stick around to get your 502 plate appearances, even though 261 of your plate appearances occurred during July, August, and September, when you hit .170/.300/.284. On the other hand, if you bat .147/.284/.235 in April, as Rougned Odor did, you do get a chance to bat .352/.426/.639 in 124 plate appearances spread between May and June, but you get them in Round Rock instead of Arlington. So there’s a bias in this analysis in favor of players who perform well in April (giving them a chance to continue to play) compared to those who don’t (who may get shipped out). This shouldn’t have a big impact on the overall variability of April data, though, since the presence of early-season outperformers like Pederson who get full-time status on the strength of their April is canceled, to an extent, by early-season underperformers like Odor who don’t.

So is April more predictive than other months? Here’s a chart for batters, using OPS as the measure, comparing the correlation between batters’ full-year performance and that of each month.

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