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Articles Tagged Los Angeles Dodgers 

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09-21

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2

The Best of Sam Miller
by
Sam Miller

09-03

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0

The Call-Up: Jose De Leon
by
Brendan Gawlowski and Scooter Hotz

08-31

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1

Two-Strike Approach: Seager Believer
by
Cat Garcia

08-29

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6

Transaction Analysis: Heart, Soul, and Marginal Upgrades
by
Bryan Grosnick and Wilson Karaman

08-02

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3

Transaction Analysis: Richer Get Rich
by
Sam Miller, Christopher Crawford, Patrick Dubuque, Craig Goldstein and Wilson Karaman

07-20

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2

Life at the Margins: Seager See, Seager Do
by
Rian Watt

07-12

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8

Prospectus Feature: Nothing Slows Rich Teams Except Themselves
by
Henry Druschel

07-08

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0

Pebble Hunting: Kershaw vs. Harper: The Mistakes
by
Sam Miller

07-01

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1

Transaction Analysis: Rodney Takes His Quiver To Miami
by
Bryan Grosnick, Matthew Trueblood, Wilson Karaman and Christopher Crawford

06-29

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0

Outta Left Field: Have the Dodgers Solved Injuries Or Are They Just Chatty?
by
Dustin Palmateer

06-21

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0

Transaction Analysis: The St. Louis Outfield Shuffle
by
Grant Jones, Christopher Crawford and Bryan Grosnick

06-15

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1

BP Unfiltered: Clayton Kershaw Should Have, Like, Three Walks Allowed This Year
by
Sam Miller

06-14

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0

What You Need to Know: Near-Max Effort
by
Daniel Rathman

06-14

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3

Prospectus Feature: 365 Days of a Shortstop Revolution
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-13

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14

Prospectus Feature: Groundball Pitchers: Nothin' To Do With Them?
by
Rob Mains

06-08

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1

What You Need to Know: Tough Guys Tough
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-07

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2

Pebble Hunting: Clayton Kershaw's 'Mistakes', Chapter Two
by
Sam Miller

06-06

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0

What You Need to Know: It Won't Always Be Like This
by
Ashley Varela

06-06

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3

Transaction Analysis: Escape From L.A.
by
Bryan Grosnick and Brendan Gawlowski

06-03

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1

What You Need to Know: Don't Know What the Hurry Is
by
Nicolas Stellini

06-03

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0

Transaction Analysis: Just A Guy(s)
by
Bryan Grosnick

06-02

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2

Transaction Analysis: Walsh Revolution
by
Rian Watt, James Fegan and Matthew Trueblood

05-31

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1

Raising Aces: Debut Ante: Julio Urias
by
Doug Thorburn

05-26

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1

Life at the Margins: The Giants Have Had a Good Week
by
Rian Watt

05-24

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0

What You Need to Know: About That Kershaw Walk...
by
Nicolas Stellini

05-18

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19

Rubbing Mud: Babies, Bathwater, and the Pace Of Play Conundrum
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-18

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2

What You Need to Know: We Can Beat Rizzo, For Just One Day
by
Emma Baccellieri

05-13

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0

What You Need to Know: 77 Strikeouts, 4 Walks
by
Emma Baccellieri

05-13

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0

Raising Aces: The Velo Movers, One Year Later
by
Doug Thorburn

05-13

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5

Life at the Margins: Swing, Batta Batta
by
Rian Watt

05-11

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2

What You Need to Know: I Have Seen The Royals, And That Team Last Night Was Not The Royals
by
Nicolas Stellini

05-02

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5

What You Need to Know: Zimmermann Dealin'
by
Ashley Varela

04-29

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Gabe Kapler, Dodgers Player Development Director
by
Wilson Karaman

04-29

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2

Prospectus Feature: Goodbye, April: You Are Not Special
by
Rob Mains

04-25

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2

Life at the Margins: The Best Pitcher Right Now
by
Rian Watt

04-25

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4

What You Need to Know: FernandoMaedaia?
by
Ashley Varela

04-22

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1

What You Need to Know: Arrieta's Masterpiece, Kershaw's Accident
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-15

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4

BP Unfiltered: The Wonderful Things That Vin Scully Might Lead You To Think About
by
Meg Rowley

04-11

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8

Rubbing Mud: Kill the Error
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-11

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0

What You Need to Know: The Fella's Last Name Is Story
by
Ashley Varela

04-07

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7

Rubbing Mud: Juan Nicasio Is Not A Miracle Yet
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-01

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2

Winter Is Leaving
by
Wilson Karaman

03-22

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0

Rumor Roundup: Dodgers Consider Their Options, e.g. Zach Lee
by
Daniel Rathman

03-04

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5

Tools of Ignorance: The Dodgers' Breakable Rotation
by
Jeff Quinton

03-03

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0

Rumor Roundup: Blue Jays Get Extendy
by
Demetrius Bell

02-19

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8

Fifth Column: How to Project Julio Urias
by
Michael Baumann

02-17

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6

Prospectus Feature: The Way-Too-Early Baseball Awards Breakdown
by
Bryan Grosnick

02-12

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0

BP Unfiltered: Glenn Burke, Historically Significant Baserunner
by
Sam Miller

02-12

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22

Fifth Column: The Death of Nostalgia in Baseball Broadcasting
by
Michael Baumann

02-03

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6

Life at the Margins: The Case Against Hiring A Smart Person
by
Rian Watt

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September 21, 2016 6:00 am

The Best of Sam Miller

2

Sam Miller

Brian Wilson signs to be the Dodgers' second-best reliever.

With our dear Editor-in-Chief leaving Baseball Prospectus for his next chapter, we wanted to highlight some of our favorite chapters of his career here. There's an incredible number of timeless Sam Miller articles to choose from, but we whittled it down enough to not break the internet. This article originally ran on December 6, 2013.

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September 3, 2016 12:40 pm

The Call-Up: Jose De Leon

0

Brendan Gawlowski and Scooter Hotz

After avoiding placing him on the 40-man roster all season, The Dodgers finally turn to De Leon to address a hole in the rotation.

The Situation: Nobody’s pitching staff has endured more injuries than Los Angeles’s has in 2016. Only Kenta Maeda and Scott Kazmir have made 20 starts, and the Dodgers have had to send 14 different starting pitchers to the hill. In addition to a certain left-handed Cy Young winner, they’ve used a guy you forgot was in the organization, a guy you never realized was in the organization, and a guy you forgot about when he left the organization; a major league journeyman and a minor league journeyman; internal injury-prone hurlers and imported injury-prone hurlers; a teenage phenom and at least one guy you probably hadn’t heard of until you saw him in a box score. Now the Dodgers turn to Jose De Leon, their top pitching prospect, as they push for the division in September.

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The Dodgers' rookie had sky-high expecations entering the season, and has surpassed them.

Saturday, September 3rd will mark one year since Dodgers rookie shortstop Corey Seager’s major-league debut. Since then, Seager has been the talk of Los Angeles baseball fans for reasons that continue to mount. The preseason favorite for Rookie of the Year has become the presumptive ROY, and he hasn't stopped there: The 22-year old is threatening to do something only two other players have in history have done: He just might win the National League MVP award.

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Chooch is switching coasts, Desmond Jennings is moving on, David Freese is staying put, and Scrabble goes to Washington.

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The Dodgers trade from a deep pool of young pitching to get 36-year-old sorta-like-an-ace Rich Hill, along with right fielder Josh Reddick.



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The world's been terrible, but the Seagers have been joy.

This is a curiosity, really, more than anything else. There’s no deeper meaning to it, and you probably won’t leave this piece with a better sense of why the sky is blue, the sea deep, or the winter cold. But it’s a fun curiosity, I think, and moreover it’s possible you’ll find the 10 minutes you invest in reading the words I’m about to write a worthwhile diversion from your ongoing journey toward nonexistence. Here’s Corey Seager’s 2016 line, through games played on Monday night:

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Money still buys success, but the league's payroll disparities appear to be shrinking. This is good.

Baseball fans are, I believe, somewhat self-conscious about the sport. Maybe that’s true of fans of every sport, but I don’t know about other sports, and I do know that when something monumental happens in one of those other sports, baseball fans are quick to use it to illustrate why baseball is (supposedly) supreme.

Something monumental happened in basketball last week, when Kevin Durant announced he was signing with the Golden State Warriors. This is a big deal, because the Golden State Warriors were extremely good this past year, winning the most regular season games ever and coming one game short of the championship, and because Kevin Durant is also extremely good, apparently one of the top three or so players in the game. This leads to a team that, on paper, is extremely, extremely good. (I don’t know anything about basketball.)

Basketball free agency is really different from baseball free agency, since basketball teams are limited in how much they can offer any single player. A number of teams made “max offers” to Durant, and tried to differentiate themselves from the others with various creative pitches. The Celtics crossed sports, and brought Tom Brady, a football player, to their meeting with Durant. He eventually chose the team that was staffed by tons of other incredibly talented players in the Warriors, whose pitch was probably something like “we win a lot already, and will win even more with you, and winning is super fun.” Good pitch!

We don’t have that kind of thing in baseball, with no caps on the salaries an individual player can make. Soft factors might still come into play sometimes—there were reports that some of the players the Cubs signed this offseason did so to play for Joe Maddon, and to try to break the Cubs’ championship drought—but teams can always offer more money, and that’s usually what drives the decision. So when Durant signed with the Warriors, in the baseball-centric milieu I reside in, I saw a lot of praising of baseball’s more egalitarian set-up. Players get paid, and while there’s a much larger gap between baseball’s rich and poor teams than basketball’s, the prevailing wisdom is that baseball is actually more fair. Poor teams can still win, and the elite players don’t flock together to form “super-teams” that might threaten the competitive integrity of the league.

That’s not exactly wrong, but it certainly leaves a lot out. Baseball might have a reputation for fairness, but its mostly due to the isolated successes of a few low-spending teams. It’s true, poor teams can succeed: from 2001 to 2015, about 25 percent of teams with the lowest, second-lowest, or third-lowest payroll in the league won 85 games or more, and about 15 percent won 90 games or more. The 2001 Athletics won 102 games, and had a payroll just slightly more than half of league average, the 29th lowest in the league that year. The 2008 Rays won 97 games with the 28th-lowest payroll, also about half of league average. Last year’s Pirates won 98 with the 24th-lowest payroll, at 72 percent of league average. It is clearly possible for poor teams to win. But I’d argue that for a league to be “fair,” it also has to be possible for the rich teams to lose, and that hasn’t really been the case in major-league baseball.

If an owner is willing to spend enough, he or she can basically guarantee a successful team. Over that same period, 2001–2015, there have been 14 teams with payrolls more than double the league average: the Yankees, every season from 2003–2013, and the Dodgers, from 2013–2015. They averaged a cool 95 wins each season, and broke the 100-win threshold three times. These super-rich teams win 100 games at nearly the same rate the teams with the three lowest salaries win 85 games. They never won fewer than 85 games, and only won less than 89 once.

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June in Clayton Kershaw's Zone 12 pitching.

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Miami invests in Fernando Rodney avoiding pumpkin status and Los Angeles picks up a Clayton Kershaw fill-in.

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Has all the Dodgers spending and talk about solving the injury riddle led to any real progress?

The Los Angeles Dodgers have a $250 million payroll, at least six former or current general managers stashed away in their front office, and one of the deepest staffs of numbers crunchers in the game. When they decided to tackle one of baseball’s most perplexing mysteries—The Injury—under Andrew Friedman’s watch, it wasn’t particularly surprising. In fact, the Dodgers might possess the perfect combination of dollars and smarts to best pursue an injury elixir; their front office depth chart includes a whopping 12 different baseball operations analysts—behind only Friedman’s old team in Tampa Bay—and a 12-person medical staff. The A’s, by comparison, have just a handful of full-time analysts on staff, and when prodded about the injury issue—in a seven-year-old New York Times article, coincidentally about Stan Conte and the Dodgers—Billy Beane responded, “I just don’t have the money to let someone spend all year looking into this.”

Teams only have so many resources to devote to analytics, and every minute spent on injury research is one that could be spent on the draft or on aging curves or on figuring out what to do with terabytes of Statcast data. While some teams—like the A’s, perhaps—have struggled divvying up limited resources, the Dodgers have enough money to hire multiple people to study injuries while hiring more people to study the people studying injuries. That’s what they’ve done, apparently, beefing up their front office with the partial goal of getting a better handle on player health. The resulting strategy has featured the Dodgers acquiring extreme injury risks, guys like Brandon McCarthy and Brett Anderson, stacking bargain-bin depth pieces next to established stars like Clayton Kershaw and Adrian Gonzalez.

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Randal Grichuk plays himself back to Triple-A, Mat Latos wears out another welcome, and the Dodgers and Mariners make an intriguing minor swap.

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Clayton Kershaw has walked seven batters this year, which might be too many.

Clayton Kershaw just walked his seventh batter of the season:

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