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Articles Tagged Los Angeles Angels 

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08-06

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2

Raising Aces: All Aboard the Skaggswagon
by
Doug Thorburn

08-01

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2

Transaction Analysis: Twins, Angels Make Seller-To-Seller Swap
by
Aaron Gleeman, Meg Rowley, Christopher Crawford and Wilson Karaman

07-30

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1

Players Prefer Presentation: 12 Minutes Of The Slowest Baseball
by
Meg Rowley

07-05

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0

The Prospectus Hit List: Tuesday, July 5
by
Matt Sussman

07-04

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3

What You Need to Know: Rams 21, Patriots 2
by
Ashley Varela

06-21

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1

Prospectus Feature: Goin' Down Slow
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-20

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1

What You Need to Know: Big Time Timmy Jim Is Back, Big Time
by
Ashley Varela

05-18

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19

Rubbing Mud: Babies, Bathwater, and the Pace Of Play Conundrum
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-12

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1

Players Prefer Presentation: The Jerk's Guide to Being a Jerk
by
Meg Rowley

05-09

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7

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, May 9
by
Matt Sussman

05-04

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0

What You Need to Know: Not Tonight, Sweet Papelbon, Not Tonight
by
Nicolas Stellini

04-08

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2

What You Need to Know: The One Unambiguous Evil In This World Is Kyle Schwarber Going Down In A Heap
by
Nicolas Stellini

03-24

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0

Rumor Roundup: Angels Out Of Their Depth
by
Demetrius Bell

03-21

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2

Life at the Margins: Greatness, Nearby
by
Rian Watt

03-14

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33

Pebble Hunting: Should Have Taken Trout
by
Sam Miller

03-09

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5

Winter Is Leaving
by
Dustin Palmateer

03-01

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7

Life at the Margins: Things Are Looking Upside
by
Rian Watt

02-18

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32

Players Prefer Presentation: Finding and Fixing Baseball's Worst Positions
by
Meg Rowley

02-17

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6

Prospectus Feature: The Way-Too-Early Baseball Awards Breakdown
by
Bryan Grosnick

02-05

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5

Players Prefer Presentation: The Year's Most Literary Hit By Pitch
by
Meg Rowley

01-22

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19

Internet Baseball Awards: The Jokester-Free AL Player of the Year
by
Tom Tango

11-30

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1

Rubbing Mud: Mike Trout and the Two-Out Offense
by
Matthew Trueblood

11-30

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5

Pebble Hunting: Everything Is Now Super, 2015
by
Sam Miller

11-25

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2

Transaction Analysis: Chris Iannetta As Upgrade
by
R.J. Anderson

10-05

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1

Rubbing Mud: How the Angels Failed Mike Trout
by
Matthew Trueblood

07-23

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1

What You Need to Know: July 23, 2015
by
Steven Jacobson

05-15

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1

Transaction Analysis: Easy Street
by
R.J. Anderson

05-06

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1

What You Need to Know: No Way
by
Daniel Rathman

05-05

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28

Rubbing Mud: The Worst Rule In Replay
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-28

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: Angels in America
by
Neil deMause

04-02

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6

Every Team's Moneyball: Los Angeles Angels: Ask First, Pitch Later
by
Sam Miller

03-31

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52

Pebble Hunting: The Case For Shaming the Cubs
by
Sam Miller

03-13

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39

Pitching Backward: Every Team's Pitching Depth, Ranked
by
Jeff Long

03-11

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25

Baseball Therapy: Understanding Josh Hamilton
by
Russell A. Carleton

03-06

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6

Rumor Roundup: Trout Pulling the Trigger
by
Daniel Rathman

03-05

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0

Rumor Roundup: Huston Street Might Have Relief-Ace'd Himself Into the Angels' Future
by
Chris Mosch

03-02

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4

Rumor Roundup: You Can't Predict Padres
by
Daniel Rathman

02-27

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Assessing the Risk: Hamilton, Greinke, and Mental Health
by
Russell A. Carleton

02-20

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5

Transaction Analysis: Happily Everth After
by
R.J. Anderson

02-06

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14

2015 Prospects: Los Angeles Angels Top 10 Prospects
by
Nick J. Faleris and BP Prospect Staff

12-17

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1

Transaction Analysis: Angels Happy Re: Joyce
by
Craig Goldstein and Nick Shlain

12-12

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0

Transaction Analysis: Turn Down For Rut
by
R.J. Anderson and Bret Sayre

11-21

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5

Fantasy Team Preview: Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
by
Wilson Karaman

11-13

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11

Baseball's Seven Wonders
by
Sam Miller

11-11

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8

Transaction Analysis: Cuddyer Quashes Qualifying Offer
by
R.J. Anderson and J.P. Breen

11-07

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1

Transaction Analysis: The Congering
by
R.J. Anderson and Mauricio Rubio

10-13

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7

Playoff Prospectus: The Greatest Defensive Outfield In History: ALCS Game 2
by
Sam Miller

10-06

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6

Playoff Prospectus: A Royal Shocker
by
J.P. Breen

10-04

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3

Playoff Prospectus: 20 Bad Josh Hamilton Swings: ALDS Game 2
by
Sam Miller

10-03

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5

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game One Recap: Royals 3, Angels 2
by
Sam Miller

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The challenge of upgrading on Daniel Nava in Anaheim, the Braves' surprising semi-bid on Justin Upton, and the closer who wants to be a starter.

The Los Angeles Angels are trying to acquire an everyday left fielder
The Angels are currently set to go into this season with 33-year-old Daniel Nava as their starting left fielder, joining the 2014 Red Sox, the 2011 Pawtucket Red Sox and the 2007 Chico Outlaws as the only teams who can say that. Although Nava is smashing in spring training, his PECOTA projection (1.5 WARP) and his 2015 output (Zero.Zip WARP) have a little more authority than his .500/.619/.719 Cactus League line. As a result, the Angels are reportedly looking for an everyday left fielder to replace him.


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The instant classics of the 2010s.

We are now on the eve of the seventh baseball season of this, the second decade of baseball’s third century. If baseball were a trashy fantasy novel, this would be the year in which the miller’s/weaver’s/craftsman’s son, after seven years of blissful ignorance about his true identity as the Emperor of the Dwarves/King of the Mystic Realm/Grand Poobah of the Pyrenees, would be awoken to his fateful quest by some wizened old man hobbling up the hill to his house.

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Measuring the scale of a single draft pick.

"We're going to take this kid with our first pick," Bane reportedly told his staff. "The problem is that he's not going to be there. He's too good." –San Francisco Chronicle

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No, really: Andrelton Simmons will help the Angels defense a lot.

If you were going to make a list about why the Angels might surprise in 2016, it’d probably start off something like this:

1. They have Mike Trout.

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March 1, 2016 6:00 am

Life at the Margins: Things Are Looking Upside

7

Rian Watt

Finding upside in the AL's lesser rotations.

This all began with R.A. Dickey, who’s projected (by PECOTA) for just 0.4 WARP next year. On the face of it, that seems rather odd. Here are Dickey’s WARP totals since 2010, complete and unabridged:

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The teams with the weakest weak spots, and the solutions that might exist to save them.

PECOTA isn’t sentient and it doesn’t have it out for your team, but goodness knows there are some players it doesn’t expect to have particularly good 2016 seasons. Much has already been made of some of the rosiest projections, or at least the most fun, but what about the real stinkers? What are the worst positions in baseball, those teams cursed with projected black holes? I looked at the worst spots by projected WARP, and tried to offer a few solutions, sometimes homegrown, sometimes in the free agent or trade market, sometimes an acceptance of fate.

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Using PECOTA + context to handicap this year's MVP, Cy Young and Rookie of the Year races.

February is too early to try to predict major baseball awards. Hell, August is often too early to try to predict major baseball awards. Nevertheless, in celebration of the release of PECOTA, I’m here to take my hack at things. Though I’ve never been an especially successful prognosticator in the past, I find the old cliché to be true: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again (using better data).”

We can use PECOTA’s advice to help project a player’s upcoming performance, and while most people gravitate towards the WARP totals and the slash lines, those aren’t the only tools in the toolbox. We can use the percentile projections to see what the system figures the high end or low end of a player’s performance range might be. We can use the Breakout/Improve/Collapse/Attrition percentages to gauge the ways in which performance might shift from history. And we can look at component and peripheral pieces, filtering out the items we think might be most or least variable, and adjust our assessments accordingly.

With a little back-of-the-napkin work, we can also attempt to add the appropriate context to the data PECOTA provides. If MVP or Cy Young voting was a WARP sorting exercise, it’d be painfully simple to predict. Fortunately, it’s neither the sorting exercise or simple to predict. Contextual factors such as how the player displays their value in attention-grabbing ways (shout out to homers and strikeouts) and how a player’s team performs make it just a bit more difficult to choose an award winner based on numbers alone.

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A novel, in one accurate throw from Jered Weaver to Kyle Seager.

It seems like a fairly routine at-bat when you look back at the play by play. First pitch: Ball. Second pitch: Hit Batter. It’s an outcome that happened 1,602 times during the 2015 regular season, and a sequence that occurred 84 times. Most instances of hit by pitch are the result of a momentary lapse in control, a slip of the ball, an imprecise targeting of “inside.” Some were brutal in their impact, others no more than a momentary stinger, but more often than not, they were dismissed as a mistake, clearly signaled as such by the pitcher’s body language or post-game interview. Some escalated and led to hand wringing and talk of what boys will do when they are being boys, but mostly hit by pitches are trivialities that fade from our memories like the bruises they leave. In that respect, this hit by pitch is like all the rest; but for particularly cruel placement, the pain from an 83 mph fastball—especially an 83 mph fastball—is relatively easy to bounce back from.

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Did this year's IBA voters really prefer the player we said they preferred in a tight race?

I love crowdsourcing projects. I love them because they take virtually no effort to set up, and yet we get a huge amount of information out of them. They work because the voters are the ones doing all the work, and whatever biases they may have get cancelled out, so that we're left with a reasonable view of the perceived truth. That's if everyone is playing fair. Sometimes, the voters try to game the system.

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November 30, 2015 10:11 am

Rubbing Mud: Mike Trout and the Two-Out Offense

1

Matthew Trueblood

It's the end of a blip.

On the eve of this past season, I wrote a piece about the shape of offensive decline in major-league baseball over the prior handful of seasons. By comparing the run-expectancy charts from the early 2000s to the chart for 2014, I found something interesting: A disproportionate part of the recent offensive downturn came with two outs. With zero and one out, the 2014 run expectancies represented about 87 percent of the zero- and one-out run expectancies of a decade earlier. With two outs, though, the average run expectancy was just 81.5 percent of the previous levels.

From there, I dug into two-out batter performance leaguewide, and found that pitchers were dominating in those situations more than ever before. Two-out walk rate was at an all-time low; strikeout rate was at an all-time high. Home run rate and isolated slugging were at a 20-year low. Relative to the league’s OPS in other situations, overall two-out offense was worse than it has ever been.

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The press conference that changes everything.

Good morning, and thank you all for being here today. We are extremely excited to introduce this man sitting beside me today, and to bring him—and his beautiful wife—into our organization. It has been a long and arduous past four years—disastrous, even—but that’s how baseball goes sometimes. It’s a game of failure. You can fail seven out of 10 times and still be Felipe Paulino. Today, though, marks a new direction and a new era for this organization.

(Note: All real quotes from real press conferences:)

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November 25, 2015 12:05 pm

Transaction Analysis: Chris Iannetta As Upgrade

2

R.J. Anderson

Jerry Dipoto's catcher follows him north, while the Angels replace Iannetta with Soto.

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