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Articles Tagged Long-term Contracts 

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05-07

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8

Bizball: Who Will Be MLB’s First $300 Million Player?
by
Maury Brown

09-01

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6

Overthinking It: How Much to Pay Jose?
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-30

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5

The BP Wayback Machine: Baseball's Hilbert Problems
by
Keith Woolner

12-10

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8

On the Beat: A Winter for Run Production
by
John Perrotto

03-09

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4

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Central Competitive Ecology
by
Jay Jaffe

02-24

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15

Contractual Matters: NL Central
by
Jeff Euston

01-28

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9

Contractual Matters: AL Central Payroll Projections
by
Jeff Euston

12-29

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32

Ahead in the Count: For the Long-Term Investors
by
Matt Swartz

10-14

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9

Future Shock: Who are the Next Rays? NL Version
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-06

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0

Fantasy Focus: More Trade Issue Solutions
by
Jeff Erickson

01-27

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0

Every Given Sunday: The Tribe Bounces Back
by
John Perrotto

01-21

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0

Transaction Analysis: Dodging the Arbitrator
by
Christina Kahrl

10-31

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Offseason Plans, NL West
by
Nate Silver

10-30

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Offseason Plans, AL East
by
Nate Silver

10-11

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Offseason Plans, AL Central
by
Nate Silver

03-23

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: Worst. Contract. Ever.
by
Rany Jazayerli

02-15

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0

Transaction Analysis: National League, December 15, 2005-February 11, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

02-14

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Transaction Analysis: American League, December 15, 2005-February 13, 2006
by
Christina Kahrl

04-06

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Transaction Analysis: March 31-April 5, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

02-11

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0

Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

02-10

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0

Baseball's Hilbert Problems
by
Keith Woolner

01-16

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0

Transaction Analysis: The Wests
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-13

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0

Transaction Analysis: The Centrals
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-25

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0

6-4-3: Next Anonymous Friday
by
Gary Huckabay

06-07

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Transaction Analysis: May 27-June 5, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

02-05

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0

Transaction Analysis: Transaction Analysis, The Wests
by
Christina Kahrl

11-15

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Strange Days
by
Dave Pease

04-26

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0

Friday Afternoon with Bud
by
Doug Pappas

03-19

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0

Rany On The Royals: Moment of Truth
by
Rany Jazayerli

02-28

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0

Prospectus Feature: The Success Cycle
by
Jonah Keri

02-28

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0

The Success Cycle
by
Jonah Keri

03-31

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Transaction Analysis: March 27-31
by
Christina Kahrl

01-19

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Transaction Analysis: January 5-15
by
Christina Kahrl

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May 7, 2012 3:00 am

Bizball: Who Will Be MLB’s First $300 Million Player?

8

Maury Brown

A look at ever-increasing player salaries and the player best-positioned to eclipse the $300 million mark

"Professional baseball is on the wane. Salaries must come down or the interest of the public must be increased in some way. If one or the other does not happen, bankruptcy stares every team in the face." – Albert Spalding, 1881

How long have we been hearing that baseball players are paid too much? By my count, it’s been since it was decided that they should be paid. Babe Ruth was the first to hit the $50,000 mark in 1922, and Hank Greenburg hit the $100,000 mark 25 years later.

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September 1, 2011 12:30 pm

Overthinking It: How Much to Pay Jose?

6

Ben Lindbergh

Free-agent-to-be Jose Reyes is poised to cash in this winter, but should his buyer beware?

Mets shortstop Jose Reyes is primed for a payday as he prepares to enter free agency on the heels of a strong season at a position where offense is scarce. Though injuries have limited him to 101 games, Reyes’ bat has been the best of any shortstop’s on a rate basis, producing a .315 True Average (TAv) that is tops at the position and a .336 average that leads the National League. In terms of overall value, the 28-year-old Dominican is tied for first with Troy Tulowitzki at 4.5 Wins Above Replacement (WARP).

Reyes will become available to the highest bidder in an offseason that features few attractive options for suitors in search of a shortstop. In the wake of recent extensions granted to J.J. Hardy and Yunel Escobar, the market will largely be restricted to past-their-prime veterans on their last legs like Orlando Cabrera and the recently-released Miguel Tejada, as well as defensive specialists like Cesar Izturis, John McDonald, and Jack Wilson. Beyond Reyes, only Jimmy Rollins and Rafael Furcal (whose $12 million club option is unlikely to be exercised) offer any real offensive upside, and Reyes is the lone member of that trio on the youthful side of 30.

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How many of the last millenium's burning baseball questions remain unanswered over a decade down the road?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Over 11 years after their publication in Baseball Prospectus 2000, how many of Keith's questions for a new millenium have we already set to rest?


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December 10, 2010 9:00 am

On the Beat: A Winter for Run Production

8

John Perrotto

The Red Sox add a second big bat in Carl Crawford, along with news and notes from around the major leagues.

The Yankees always say that if they don't win the World Series then it has been an unsuccessful season. Their main rivals, the Red Sox, don't have standards quite that high, but it's close. When the Red Sox fail to make the postseason, Red Sox Nation considers it a failure.

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March 9, 2010 12:03 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Central Competitive Ecology

4

Jay Jaffe

The dirty half dozen throw their money around in different ways and to different extents, but are adaptations coming?

The great Red Smith wasn't a fan of baseball's six division/two Wild Card format. Though he died 12 years before the plan came to fruition, he saw it coming as early as 1978, when he wrote that, "[T]he powers, principalities, and archangels of the game are considering a plan to restructure the major leagues so that almost every team can be a winner, or look like one."

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The day is dawning when the Cardinals must re-sign Albert Pujols and the Brewers must do the same with Prince Fielder.

Baseball's largest division will likely feature four of the top 15 payrolls in the game for 2010-the Cubs, Cardinals, Astros, and Brewers. The other two teams, the Reds and the Pirates, project to rank 23rd and 29th or 30th, respectively. Continuing our look at the 2010 payroll forecasts (the projections for the AL Central can be found here), let's take a look at the NL Central.

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January 28, 2010 12:06 pm

Contractual Matters: AL Central Payroll Projections

9

Jeff Euston

Starting in the middle, a six-part evaluation of the payroll picture of the 30 clubs.

Let's take a look at the payroll forecasts for 2010 for each of the five teams in the American League Central, the first in a six-part series spotlighting each of the divisions in Major League Baseball.

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December 29, 2009 6:33 am

Ahead in the Count: For the Long-Term Investors

32

Matt Swartz

A study of which positions give the least value in the second and third years of multi-year contracts signed by free agent.

Last week, we discussed when bad teams should attempt to sign free agents. The primary scenarios in which this makes sense are when the team stands an outside chance of competing, and when there also will be a valuable market for that player at the trade deadline in the likely scenario that the team is not competitive. In this case, the premium that competitive teams should place on having players for the stretch run is often to allow the team to recoup some of their lost money on the player.

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October 14, 2008 11:27 am

Future Shock: Who are the Next Rays? NL Version

9

Kevin Goldstein

A look at the National League bottom-feeders who might be on the verge of changing their fortunes.

Last time out, we handicapped the American League bottom-feeders in an attempt to find the next Rays-like leap forward, so today, we look at the National League.

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June 6, 2008 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: More Trade Issue Solutions

0

Jeff Erickson

Readers came up with their methods for avoiding unfair dump trades.

Anytime I write about league conflicts or ethical issues, I get far more responses than I do for any particular advice column. This was certainly true about last week's article--your responses were both overwhelming and enlightening. Some of the ideas came from leagues that have been in existence almost as long as our fascinating hobby has lasted. It never ceases to amaze me to see how these leagues have evolved, look at the various permutations in their league rules, and find out how long some of them have stuck together.

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January 27, 2008 12:00 am

Every Given Sunday: The Tribe Bounces Back

0

John Perrotto

A devastating end to their 2007 season will have no negative effect in 2008, according to Tribe manager Eric Wedge.

The Cleveland Indians could be still suffering from an October hangover, understandably, even with the date for pitchers and catchers to report to Winter Haven within sight.

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January 21, 2008 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Dodging the Arbitrator

0

Christina Kahrl

The Rays and Braves make a minor swap, the Rangers shore up their rotation, and everyone else is in the business of being agreeable.

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