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Articles Tagged Left-handed Hitters 

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05-22

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1

Fantasy Freestyle: Cool Slider, Bro
by
Jason Collette

08-10

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6

Raising Aces: Hocking LOOGYs
by
Doug Thorburn

05-29

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3

What You Need to Know: Tuesday, May 29
by
Daniel Rathman

09-07

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13

Spinning Yarn: Home Plate Umpire Positioning
by
Mike Fast

08-17

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11

Spinning Yarn: Why are Batters Hit by Pitches?
by
Mike Fast

06-15

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10

Spinning Yarn: Vogelsong Poetry
by
Mike Fast

02-16

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59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

02-03

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16

Overthinking It: A Little Bit Softer Now
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-27

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43

Ahead in the Count: The Clutch and The Shifted
by
Matt Swartz

07-09

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21

On the Beat: Friday Update: Relievers on the Market
by
John Perrotto

04-04

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
David Laurila

04-02

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11

Checking the Numbers: SHINO-myte!
by
Eric Seidman

02-08

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37

Baseball Therapy: Why Not Two Pitchers?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-06

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9

On the Beat: Pre-Winter Meetings Shopping Lists
by
John Perrotto

10-06

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6

Playoff Prospectus: Post-Season Ballparks
by
Clay Davenport

08-26

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13

You Could Look It Up: Don't Fence Me In
by
Steven Goldman

04-14

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25

You Could Look It Up: V for Vendetta
by
Steven Goldman

02-11

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9

You Could Look It Up: Going South?
by
Steven Goldman

07-17

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0

On the Beat: The Two-Week Watch
by
John Perrotto

01-23

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: Marlins, White Sox, and Rays
by
Rany Jazayerli

01-10

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Getting Shifty
by
Dan Fox

12-20

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Schrodinger's Bat: The Issue of the Day, and Ranging into the Outfield
by
Dan Fox

12-13

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Inching Along
by
Dan Fox

10-21

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Prospectus Q&A: Dave LaRoche
by
David Laurila

09-13

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Schrodinger's Bat: The Return of the Fish Eye
by
Dan Fox

07-05

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Schrodinger's Bat: Searching for the Gyroball
by
Dan Fox

06-28

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Schrodinger's Bat: Playing Favorites
by
Dan Fox

06-14

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Schrodinger's Bat: The Science and Art of Building a Better Pitcher Profile
by
Dan Fox

10-16

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0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

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Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

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Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

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0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

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Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

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Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

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Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

10-02

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Tigers versus Yankees
by
Rany Jazayerli

04-27

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Of Crowds and Splits
by
Dan Fox

04-13

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Schrodinger's Bat: The Irreducible Essence of Platoon Splits
by
Dan Fox

06-30

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0

Crooked Numbers: Left Wing Conspiracy
by
James Click

04-05

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Prospectus Q&A: Juan Marichal
by
Carlos J. Lugo

09-02

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The Disappearing Southpaw
by
James Click

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This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

May 22, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Cool Slider, Bro

1

Jason Collette

Indians righty Justin Masterson has improved considerably against left-handed hitters this season, and the strides he has made with his slider are at the root of his success.

Nick Swisher is one of my favorite players in baseball to watch play the game because I appreciate how he works a count and genuinely seems to enjoy playing the game. My favorite part about his game actually comes off the field, because he is comedic gold when you get him talking on a topic he is excited about. Take his recent assessment of teammate Justin Masterson.

Swisher was asked by Bud Shaw of the Cleveland Plain Dealer to describe teammate Justin Masterson in three words, and in the most Swisher response ever, he replied, “Power sinker, bro.” Swisher expanded his bro-view of the hurler by adding, “What’s really impressive is the number of strikeouts he’s had. Look at any great team and it starts with that number-one guy.”

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August 10, 2012 5:00 am

Raising Aces: Hocking LOOGYs

6

Doug Thorburn

How do left-handed specialists make the most of their platoon advantage, and at what cost does their approach come?

Growing up left-handed is a tough gig. We left-handers can't write a sentence in ink without needing to wash our hands, classroom scissors malfunction in our claw-like grips, and driving a stick-shift requires a certain degree of ambidexterity. In little league, defensive assignments were restricted to roaming the outfield pasture unless one happened to have a hyperactive pituitary gland, thus earning a trip to play first base with the right-handed infielders. I was able to fool one coach into putting me at catcher for a season, but that experiment was predictably short-lived.

The mound is a southpaw's chance at redemption, where the bar for lefties to gain acceptance is lowered. Left-handers sit right in the cross-hairs of the supply-demand curve in the majors due to the limited player-pool as well as a league-wide desire to exploit platoon splits (see table for 2012 figures). Just 10 percent of the world is left-handed, yet southpaws have been on the mound for 31 percent of all plate appearances this season. Lefty batters make up 44 percent of plate appearances, a function of the advantages that are inherent in a two-step head-start down the line, combined with the reality that it is much easier to switch sides of the plate than it is to alternate throwing arms.

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A brutal eight-game losing streak has taken the Atlanta Braves from first to worst in the NL East.

The Weekend Takeaway
It’s not all that hard to go from first to last in nine days this early in the season. To do so as resoundingly as the Braves have, though, takes a special kind of awfulness.

At the end of play on May 20, Fredi Gonzalez’s team was 26-16 and enjoyed a 1 ½-game lead in the National League East. At the close of shop last night, the Braves had slipped to 26-24 and sat in a last-place tie with the Phillies, four games behind the first-place Nationals.


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Does the way an umpire positions himself behind home plate affect the boundaries of his strike zone?

We have known for several years that right-handed and left-handed batters do not see the same strike zone in the major leagues. The strike zone for left-handed batters shifts about two inches toward the outside. This observation goes back at least to Dr. John Walsh’s analysis of PITCHf/x strike zone data in 2007.

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What factors determine how often hitters take one for the team?

Every season major league pitchers throw tens of thousands of pitches inside off the plate, yet they hit batters “only” about 1500-1800 times in a season. Why do some inside pitches hit the batter, while others do not?

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Examining the approach that has made Ryan Vogelsong a giant among Giants with the aid of PITCHf/x.

In January, Ryan Vogelsong signed a minor-league contract with the San Francisco Giants. He compiled a 3.27 ERA in 22 solid innings in spring training but was sent to Triple-A Fresno to begin the year. He followed that up with two strong starts at Fresno, allowing three runs and striking out 17 in 11 1/3 innings. On April 17, Vogelsong joined the big club when Barry Zito went on the disabled list with a foot injury, and on April 28, he took Zito’s place in the Giants starting rotation.

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Examining umpire calling and catcher framing leads to thought-provoking questions about the amorphous nature of the strike zone.

Ever since the PITCHf/x system debuted in the 2006 playoffs, people have been interested in what it says about the strike zone that the umpires call.

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February 3, 2011 9:05 am

Overthinking It: A Little Bit Softer Now

16

Ben Lindbergh

Do southpaws really tend to be soft tossers, and if so, why?

“They have crooked arms. They throw crooked, they walk crooked, and they think crooked. They even wear their clothes crooked. You have to figure they’re a little crazy.” —Al Schacht

“There ain’t a left-hander in the world who can run a straight line. It’s the gravitational pull on the earth’s axis that gets ’em.”Ray Miller

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Do hitters who face a shift actually have an advantage?

Picture this: David Ortiz steps to the plate in a tie game with runners on first and second in the bottom of the ninth inning. He gets into a deep count and lines a base hit over the right side of the infield to score the winning run. You’ve seen this time and again. 

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July 9, 2010 8:00 am

On the Beat: Friday Update: Relievers on the Market

21

John Perrotto

A look at six interesting bullpen arms that could be traded by July 31 along with notes from around the major leagues.

One thing advanced statistical analysis has taught everyone is that relief pitchers are the game's most fungible players. One year they're great and the next they're not. There are always enough relievers available that a team can build a bullpen without spending a large portion of its payroll if it picks the right pitchers and gets a little lucky.

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A conversation about analysis and the game with the former skipper and present-day talking head.

Buck Showalter is in many ways an old-school baseball man, but that doesn’t mean the former Yankees, Diamondbacks, and Rangers skipper doesn‘t value data -- or that he hasn’t for more than three decades. He unmistakably understands the mechanics of the game. Currently an analyst for ESPN, Showalter offered his thoughts on a variety of subjects, including how the game has (and hasn’t) changed, why Paul O’Neill could hit southpaws, why switch-sliders make good switch-hitters, and what makes the Twins the Twins.

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April 2, 2010 2:15 pm

Checking the Numbers: SHINO-myte!

11

Eric Seidman

Those who switch-hit in name only make up a rare cadre all their own.

A few weeks ago I found myself engrossed in a Tommy Bennett article on the Braves and stumbled upon his usage of the term SHINO when describing Melky Cabrera. The acronym stands for Switch-Hitter-In-Name-Only, and refers to some hitters with 'S' or 'Both' under the Bats column on their player pages, and specifically the ones who might want to think about changing that status. They certainly switch, but they don’t offer much in the way of hitting. The term tickled my fancy, in part due to the fact that I’ve had an article on switch-hitters in my to-do queue for over a year now that was set to focus on those who consistently struggled from one side of the plate. Though the title of that shelved article involved Bobby Kielty and not this term; as we’ll see, maybe Kielty should have been included in the title.

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