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Articles Tagged Larry Walker 

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The 17th installment of Joe Sheehan's excellent newsletter appeared in my inbox last night, and it featured analysis of the big, weird Rockies-Marlins-Braves deal that was hinted at last week and finally agreed upon--pending approval from the commissioner's office--this weekend. In analyzing the deal, Joe puts the Rockies in the winner's column and gives the Marlins a goose egg.

The 17th installment of Joe Sheehan's excellent newsletter appeared in my inbox last night (drop Joe some email if you're interested in subscribing), and it featured analysis of the big, weird Rockies-Marlins-Braves deal that was hinted at last week and finally agreed upon--pending approval from the commissioner's office--this weekend. In analyzing the deal, Joe puts the Rockies in the winner's column and gives the Marlins a goose egg. Here's an excerpt from the Marlins section:

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March 8, 2002 7:19 pm

Larry Walker and the Hall of Fame

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John Brattain

It was an innocent enough question. When I did my column comparing Ozzie Smith and Omar Vizquel as regards their Hall of Fame resumes (or lack thereof), out of the blue the query came: is Larry Walker a Hall of Famer?

It was an innocent enough question. When I did my column comparing Ozzie Smith and Omar Vizquel and their Hall of Fame resumes (or lack thereof), out of the blue the query came: is Larry Walker a Hall of Famer?

My first instinct is "no." Not because of Coors Field, but because of his career-long fragility. Larry Walker has Hall of Fame talent, which is not the same as being a Hall of Famer. Dick Allen had Hall of Fame talent, yet didn't make it to Cooperstown. Ditto Darryl StrawberryDwight GoodenBret SaberhagenAlbert Belle, and dozens of other unfortunates. It's one thing to have "the gift." Translating that talent into a plaque is quite another matter.

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March 8, 2002 2:31 am

The Daily Prospectus: Rocky Mountain High

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Joe Sheehan

I spent a few hours this morning on the air with Mike Rosen of KOA Radio in Denver. Looking back on the segment--which included Rockies president Kelly McGregor and owner Jerry McMorris--I realize that I probably didn't articulate just how optimistic I am about this team this year. In an NL West with no great team, the Rockies are a good one, and perfectly capable of winning the division.

I spent a few hours this morning on the air with Mike Rosen of KOA Radio in Denver. Looking back on the segment--which included Rockies president Kelly McGregor and owner Jerry McMorris--I realize that I probably didn't articulate just how optimistic I am about this team this year. In an NL West with no great team, the Rockies are a good one, and perfectly capable of winning the division.

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My first instinct is "no." Not because of Coors Field, but because of his career-long fragility. Larry Walker has Hall of Fame talent, which is not the same as being a Hall of Famer. Dick Allen had Hall of Fame talent, yet didn't make it to Cooperstown. Ditto Darryl Strawberry, Dwight Gooden, Bret Saberhagen, Albert Belle, and dozens of other unfortunates. It's one thing to have "the gift." Translating that talent into a plaque is quite another matter.

When I think Larry Walker, I think Pete Reiser, who came on the scene before World War II. In 1941, his first full season, Reiser set the world on fire. He hit .343/.406/.558; reached double digits in doubles, triples, and homers (39/17/14); scored 117 runs; won the batting title; led the league in OPS; tied for first in adjusted OPS, made the All Star team; and was second in NL MVP voting.

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November 7, 2001 12:00 am

Staff Ballots

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Baseball Prospectus

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It wasn't that long ago, really. In 1992, 30 homers would have placed a hitter fourth in the National League. These days, a player could hit 30 home runs and never show up on the typical fan's radar. We're in the middle of the biggest home run jump in baseball history. (Big news, to you all, I'm sure. Tomorrow's feature: the Pope wears a skullcap!)

If the sportswriters of the future aren't careful, then hitters of the '90s are going to be seriously overrepresented in the Hall of Fame, the same way that hitters of the '20s and '30s are today. People looked at the gaudy batting averages of the era (Freddy Lindstrom hit .379 in 1930! Ooooooh!) and instinctively viewed then through the prism of their own era (a .379 average in 1976, when the Vets' committee inducted Lindstrom, would have been 40 points higher than any major leaguer actually hit that year).

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Players of the Year

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The full results of this year's IBA voting.

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