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Articles Tagged Lance Berkman 

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04-07

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The Week in Quotes: March 31 - April 6
by
Nick Bacarella, Morris Greenberg, Chris Mosch and Nick Wheatley-Schaller

01-30

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18

Skewed Left: Saying Goodbye to Lance Berkman
by
Zachary Levine

09-09

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5

Fantasy Freestyle: The Other Guys, Part One
by
Mike Gianella

01-08

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Transaction Analysis: Hoping for a Berkmanlike Effort
by
R.J. Anderson

10-06

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2

Playoff Prospectus: Postseason Collateral Damage
by
Corey Dawkins

05-23

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1

Transaction Analysis: Twins Change the Marquis
by
R.J. Anderson

04-20

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Collateral Damage Daily: Friday, April 20
by
Corey Dawkins

03-02

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13

Prospectus Preview: NL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part II
by
Stephani Bee and Larry Granillo

10-28

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54

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-22

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4

Transaction Analysis Blog: An All-Missouri Edition
by
R.J. Anderson

07-01

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50

All-Star Selections
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-05

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1

The BP Broadside: The Premature Burial, by Edgar Allan Berkman
by
Steven Goldman

05-02

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Divide and Conquer, NL Central: Parting with a Puma, Welcoming a Walrus
by
Larry Granillo

10-25

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9

Checking the Numbers: Cratering
by
Eric Seidman

08-02

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2

The Week in Quotes: July 26-August 1
by
Alex Carnevale

08-01

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9

Transaction Analysis: Deadline Day Outcomes in the NL
by
Christina Kahrl and Kevin Goldstein

08-01

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23

Transaction Analysis: Deadline Day Outcomes in the AL
by
Christina Kahrl and Kevin Goldstein

07-21

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18

Fixing The Astros, Part 1
by
Marc Normandin

04-26

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26

Under The Knife: Another Call for Pitcher Protection
by
Will Carroll

04-06

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7

Checking the Numbers: SHINOMetrics
by
Eric Seidman

09-23

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24

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Houston Astros
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-18

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Prospectus Preview: Sunday's Games to Watch
by
Marc Normandin

10-31

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Internet Baseball Awards
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-18

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Prospectus Game of the Week: Philadelphia Phillies at Houston Astros, September 15, 2006
by
Derek Jacques

06-27

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Prospectus Game of the Week: Houston Astros at Chicago White Sox, June 23, 2006
by
Derek Jacques

01-27

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Prospectus Notebook: Angels, Astros, Nationals
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-30

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The Week in Quotes: August 22-29
by
Ryan Wilkins

07-14

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Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

12-20

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Prospectus Roundtable: Jeff Kent, Kevin Millwood, and Erik Estrada
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-07

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0

Staff Ballots
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-09

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Playoff Prospectus
by
Christina Kahrl

07-12

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0

Prospectus Awards Balloting
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-30

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Transaction Analysis: May 25-28, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

05-16

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 11-14, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

01-25

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Top 40 Prospects of 1999
by
Rany Jazayerli

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Rumors of Lance Berkman's demise may have been greatly exaggerated, but it would be equally unwise to put too much stock in his recovery.

In a season more notable for star players off to slow starts and a league-wide offensive malaise, the way Lance Berkman has scalded the ball at the outset of his Cardinals career is nothing less than shocking. Not only was he hitting .390/.461/.750 through Tuesday in a league averaging only .250/.320/.388, but he was doing so after a 2010 season that saw him reduced from perennial All-Star status to ineffectual part-time work with the Yankees.

There was plenty of reason to think that Berkman’s posterior was ready to have the proverbial fork stuck in it. Thirty-four years old last year, Berkman lost the beginning of the season to knee surgery, and when he returned his bat didn’t have the life that had produced career .299/.412/.555 rates through the end of 2009. He endured painful slumps such as a mid-June stretch of 10 games in which he went 6-for-36 with 13 strikeouts, his problems hitting left-handers, a career-long problem for this switch-hitter, became extreme, and a power stroke that had produced as many as 55 doubles and 45 home runs in a season seemed to have weakened.

The Berkman acquired by the Yankees was bloated, slow, and indecisive both at the plate and in the field, a far cry from the athlete who was capable of taking regular turns in center field in his mid-20s. Hitters tend to have a fairly linear evolution to their careers—normally, when they start to go, they don’t come back. Berkman’s physical deterioration, combined with his miserable results in New York (.255/.358/.349, one home run in 123 plate appearances) seemed to suggest that the Cardinals’ plan to sign him and give him regular playing time in an outfield corner ranked somewhere between foolishly optimistic and delusional.

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Lance Berkman reminds Astros fans that he wears big shoes, but Brett Wallace may be capable of filling them; Alfonso Soriano rarely gets on base but often drives himself in.

It was an eye-opening week in Minute Maid Park, as Zod and the other residents of Planet Houston were treated to superb performances from first basemen of the Astros' past, present, and—perhaps—future.

Lance Berkman, the twelve-year Astros veteran who was traded to the Yankees late last year before signing with the Cardinals over the winter, made his return to Houston as a visiting player on Tuesday. He was well-received by the fans, who gave him an extended standing ovation in his first at-bat. When he laced a single to right field off of an inside fastball from Bud Norris, the crowd erupted into more cheers. Needless to say, the man with the second-most home runs in franchise history is still very popular in the Bayou City.

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October 25, 2010 8:00 am

Checking the Numbers: Cratering

9

Eric Seidman

A look at the hitters whose True Average fell sharply from one season to the next and how they fared the following season.

Lance Berkman had a down year. I know that isn’t exactly earth-shattering news, but he did not perform up to the level we have come to expect given his career numbers. At 34 years old, he is unlikely to continue to hit like he did in the early part of his career, but his 2010 numbers paled in comparison to those produced a year ago, when he hit .274/.399/.509 with a .314 TAv. In 2010, Berkman put up a .288 TAv while hitting .248/.368/.413. Though his season was plagued by injuries, he managed a mere 14 home runs, and that slash line looks strange when attached to his name. The numbers were not terrible, but rather different, considering that he has never posted a BA below .274, an OBP below .386, an SLG below .509, or a TAv below .300.

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Plenty of trade deadline reaction, along with other chatter from around the major leagues.

THE ONE-TOOL WONDER MUST SAVE A FRANCHISE

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The Braves and Pirates make a flurry of moves, but they weren't the only ones wheeling and dealing on July 31.

IN THIS ISSUE

National League

ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS
Team Audit | Player Cards | Depth Chart
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Traded RHP Chad Qualls to the Rays for a PTBNL; traded C-R Chris Snyder, SS-R Pedro Ciriaco, and $3 million to the Pirates for RHP D.J. Carrasco, INF-R Bobby Crosby, and OF-L Ryan Church; recalled C-R John Hester from Reno (Triple-A). [7/31]
Optioned OF-R Cole Gillespie to Reno. [8/1]

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The Red Sox continue to retrench, while the Yankees add big names--but will they make a big impact?

IN THIS ISSUE

American League

BALTIMORE ORIOLES
Team Audit | Player Cards | Depth Chart
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Traded LHP Will Ohman to the Marlins for RHP Rick VandenHurk, and optioned VandenHurk to Norfolk (Triple-A). [7/31]
Recalled LHP Troy Patton from Norfolk. [8/1]

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July 21, 2010 8:00 am

Fixing The Astros, Part 1

18

Marc Normandin

Attempting to find a way to make the rebuilding process for the Astros go by much quicker.

The Astros have some significant decisions to make leading up to the July 31 trade deadline. The course they take over the next 10 days could alter the direction that the franchise heads in—either way, that R word no fan base likes to hear will be used, but the length of time the Astros and their fans have to suffer can be lessened significantly.

General manager Ed Wade has a chance to be the Houston Astros' personal Hari Seldon. If he deals Roy Oswalt, Lance Berkman, and Brett Myers for pieces they can use in the future, Houston's Dark Age (which it is already in the midst of) will be much shorter than if they are left to build entirely from within. We're not talking the difference between 1,000 years and 30,000, but there is a difference between a five-year plan and a Pittsburgh Pirates-esque fall into the under-.500 abyss that could ultimately last much longer.

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April 26, 2010 4:31 pm

Under The Knife: Another Call for Pitcher Protection

26

Will Carroll

A line drive back through the box produces another scary moment and other medical news from around the major leagues.

Chris Jakubauskas (concussion, 5/15)

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April 6, 2010 10:44 am

Checking the Numbers: SHINOMetrics

7

Eric Seidman

Understanding neuroscience could help devolop better switch-hitters.

Last week we took a look at SHINOs, switch-hitters in name only, who were defined as batters that swung a mighty broomstick from one side of the plate but fell below the league average from the other. They certainly switched, but the handedness of the pitcher determined if they were to hit like Willie Mays or Willy Taveras.

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September 23, 2009 2:01 pm

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Houston Astros

24

Baseball Prospectus

The anticipated crash leaves the Astros in the crater, but will their payroll commitments bury them even deeper?

Baseball Prospectus' Pre-season Projection: 70-92, fifth place
Current record: 70-80, fourth place


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May 18, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Preview: Sunday's Games to Watch

0

Marc Normandin

Bopping Texas-style, a pair of hot pitchers square off in Ohio, and how low can the Nats bats go?

Today's Full Slate of Games

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Before all the IBA ballots are counted, staff picks give a hint as to what hands the awards may find themselves in.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. Travis Hafner posted the highest OBP in the AL while nobody noticed, while Neifi Perez ended up getting playoff PT. The young guns had their day and then some. Jermaine Dye gave a lengthy spanking to his 90th percentile PECOTA projection (PECOTA's .288/.359/.516 versus an actual .315/.385/.622). The crop of AL rookies included a guy with a 0.92 ERA finishing third, and rooks like Jered Weaver (105:33 K:BB) and Francisco Liriano (144:32) threatening to be Johan Santana's biggest challengers in 2007. The National League featured tighter races, including a four-way brawl for the Pitcher of the Year and another impressive crop of newbies.

Eight staff members weighed in on the season that was, casting their ballots for the Internet Baseball Awards. We summarized their findings below, and then let them have their individual say.

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