CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Happy Thanksgiving! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 1

Articles Tagged Labrum 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

Michael Pineda's labrum tear doesn't bode well for his future, but it's not the death sentence it used to be.

On Wednesday, the Yankees revealed that Michael Pineda had suffered a torn labrum, a devastating turn of events both for the 23-year-old righty and for the team that acquired him from the Mariners for top prospect Jesus Montero back in January. Pineda will miss the entire season and part of 2013, thinning the Yankees' surplus of starting pitching—and underscoring the fact that you can never have too much—while raising the question of whether they will ever get much value out of him.

Read the full article...

Taking a look at an injury being treated in-season more often thanks to improvements in surgical techniques.

Among major-league players, treatments for torn labrums in the hip are on the rise. In our database, only eight major leaguers underwent surgery on their hips from 2002-2006. From 2007-2011, 33 players had a hip procedure performed. Improvements in surgical technique and technology have significantly shortened the rehabilitation, making surgery a viable option in the middle of the season.

While hip arthroscopy has been around for many years, it has been only relatively recently that its role in treatment for athletes with femoroacetabular impingements and/or labral tears has significantly increased. Nevertheless, much like other conditions seen in baseball players, its frequency will continue to rise in the near future, perhaps limiting the severity of acquired osteoarthritis later in life.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

The skinny on an elusive injury that increasingly plagues pitchers.

Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) tears are an increasingly common injury in baseball players. Much more common in throwing athletes than non-throwers, SLAP lesions have gained a lot more attention as baseball pitchers have been studied in greater detail.

Anatomy
As we described in a previous article, the shoulder is made up of three bones but many different soft tissues. The clavicle, scapula, and humerus serve as attachment sites for the various muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves in order for proper function to occur. In the case of SLAP lesions, we are most interested in the labrum and the tendon of the long head of the biceps.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

For the last decade, pitchers have not feared elbow surgery as they once did. Advances in surgical techniques and rehabilitation have made what was once a career-threatening condition a routine procedure with a predictable outcome. Return from Tommy John surgery has been reduced from two years in the late '70s to a mere nine-to-12 months today. The same cannot be said for shoulder injuries. Instead of surgical repair, the best techniques have been those of prevention. Dr. Frank Jobe's "Throwers Ten" program has led to a reduction in the number of rotator cuff injuries at all levels of baseball, but at the same time, there has been an explosion of a new type of injury--the labrum tear.

For the last decade, pitchers have not feared elbow surgery as they once did. Advances in surgical techniques and rehabilitation have made what was once a career-threatening condition a routine procedure with a predictable outcome. Return from Tommy John surgery has been reduced from two years in the late '70s to a mere nine-to-12 months today.

Read the full article...

Between a careful analysis of what data is available, the creative use of proxy variables in estimating injuries throughout time, and the application of some principles of sports medicine, we are at least in a position to make some educated guesses about the nature of pitcher injuries. Our particular focus in this article will be the progression of pitcher injury rates by age.

Pitching is an unnatural act that invites injury. The stress it places on the bones of the shoulder, arm, and back is immense. The strain it places on the 36 muscles that attach to the humerus, clavicle, and scapula is remarkable. It is widely accepted by sports medicine practitioners that every pitch causes at least some amount of damage to the system.

It seems fair to say that the study of pitcher injuries is an important part of sabermetric analysis. The statistical evidence available to test theories about pitcher injuries, however, is often missing. While there are databases that contain every recorded statistic from the days of Al Spalding and beyond, and others that document every play of every game in the past 30 years, a comprehensive database of player injury history simply doesn't exist.

However, between a careful analysis of what data is available, the creative use of proxy variables in estimating injuries throughout time, and the application of some principles of sports medicine, we are at least in a position to make some educated guesses about the nature of pitcher injuries. Our particular focus in this article will be the progression of pitcher injury rates by age.

Methodology and Statistical Results

To create an actuarial backbone for our study, we applied the same approach that is used to calculate attrition rate in the PECOTA forecasts. Attrition rate describes the percentage of pitchers who experience a decline in their innings pitched of at least 50 percent. Such a dramatic decline will not always indicate that a serious injury has occurred--it can also reflect demotion, retirement, and so on. However, by placing a few restrictions on our dataset, we can serve to limit these cases, and use attrition rate as a reasonable proxy for catastrophic injury.

In order to be included in the study, a pitcher needed to have pitched at least 150 innings in the previous season, with a park-adjusted ERA no more than 10 percent worse than his league average. That is, our study was focused on pitchers who had already pitched at least one effective season in the major leagues, and who were likely to have every opportunity to do so again in the absence of significant injury. All pitchers from 1946-2002 were considered, with innings pitched totals prorated over a 162-game schedule. The chart below tracks attrition rate at different ages throughout a pitcher's career.

Read the full article...

The Baseball Prospectus staff responds to reader mail about Rick Peterson, Todd Zeile and more.

RICK PETERSON

Read the full article...

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries