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Articles Tagged Keeper Leagues 

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01-15

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17

Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: Brandon Belt vs. Lucas Duda
by
J.P. Breen

01-14

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20

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: First Basemen
by
Craig Goldstein

01-08

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27

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: The Top 50 Catchers
by
Bret Sayre

01-07

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14

Get to Know: Catcher Prospects
by
Craig Goldstein

12-12

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9

Fantasy Freestyle: Shortening Your Dynasty Rebuild
by
J.P. Breen

12-02

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4

Fantasy Freestyle: Keeper Decisions
by
Nick Shlain

09-25

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1

They Hold No Quarter: Starting Pitchers
by
BP Fantasy Staff

09-03

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2

They Hold No Quarter: Shortstops
by
BP Fantasy Staff

08-20

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4

They Hold No Quarter: Second Basemen
by
BP Fantasy Staff

08-13

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7

They Hold No Quarter: First Base
by
BP Fantasy Staff

07-17

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8

Fantasy Freestyle: Midseason Keeper League FAAB Strategy
by
Jeff Quinton

07-02

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4

Fantasy Freestyle: Minor League Draft Pick Valuation
by
Jeff Quinton

06-19

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7

Fantasy Freestyle: Keeping Tabs on the Cubs' Top Prospects
by
Mauricio Rubio

06-11

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7

Dynasty Dynamics: Progress Report: Prospect Edition
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

06-11

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11

Top 50 Dynasty League Prospects
by
Bret Sayre

06-06

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6

Day One Draft Recap
by
Bret Sayre

06-05

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6

Fantasy Freestyle: Keeper League Purgatory
by
Jeff Quinton

05-15

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0

Fantasy Freestyle: The Middle of the Road
by
Wilson Karaman

05-13

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29

Dynasty Dynamics: The U25 Top 150, Part One
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

04-22

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4

Dynasty Dynamics: AL Central U25 Lists
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

04-15

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20

Dynasty Dynamics: NL Central U25 Lists
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

04-14

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Auction Leagues and Salary/Contract Dynamics
by
Mike Gianella

03-24

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22

Fantasy Freestyle: Two Deep-League Lessons From the Preseason
by
Ben Carsley

03-05

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13

Get to Know: Relief Pitcher Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

03-04

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25

The Top 101 Fantasy Prospects of 2014
by
Bret Sayre

03-03

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33

The Top 101 Fantasy Prospects of 2014
by
Bret Sayre

02-27

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34

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 175 Starting Pitchers
by
Bret Sayre

02-27

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31

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Starting Pitchers
by
Paul Sporer

02-26

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16

Get to Know: Starting Pitcher Prospects
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

02-20

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20

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 120 Outfielders
by
Bret Sayre

02-19

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23

Get to Know: Outfield Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

02-19

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21

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Outfielders
by
Craig Goldstein

02-14

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8

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 50 Third Basemen
by
Bret Sayre

02-13

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15

Get to Know: Third Base Prospects
by
Craig Goldstein

02-12

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12

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Third Basemen
by
Ben Carsley

02-06

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27

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 50 Shortstops
by
Bret Sayre

02-05

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12

Get to Know: Shortstop Prospects
by
Ben Carsley

02-05

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12

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 8-10
by
Bret Sayre

02-05

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12

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Shortstops
by
Craig Goldstein

01-31

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6

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 5-7
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-30

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14

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 50 Second Basemen
by
Bret Sayre

01-29

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10

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Second Basemen
by
Ben Carsley

01-28

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18

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 3-4
by
Bret Sayre

01-23

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12

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 50 First Basemen
by
Bret Sayre

01-22

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24

BP Experts Prospect Mock Draft: Rounds 1-2
by
Bret Sayre

01-22

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16

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: First Basemen
by
Paul Sporer

09-09

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5

Fantasy Freestyle: The Other Guys, Part One
by
Mike Gianella

08-20

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Should I Play for "The Money"?
by
Mike Gianella

08-19

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4

Five to Watch: Post-Hype Prospects for 2014
by
Craig Goldstein

06-18

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0

The Call-Up: Zack Wheeler
by
Mark Anderson and Bret Sayre

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January 15, 2015 6:00 am

Tale of the Tape, Dynasty Edition: Brandon Belt vs. Lucas Duda

17

J.P. Breen

Which of these first sackers should you choose in multi-year formats?

By this point, you’ve seen a few Tale of the Tape articles. Matt Collins kicked us off strong, Craig Goldstein refused to fall victim to groupthink and branched out with a dynasty league version, and Mr. Collins doubled up with another installment this week. The 2015 Tale of the Tape series shines a spotlight on two closely ranked players at the same position, hoping to pry them apart enough to help fantasy owners on draft day. Today, we’re featuring a showdown between Lucas Duda, who was a breakout guy last year, and perennial fantasy darling Brandon Belt. It’s East Coast vs. West Coast. The Big Apple vs. the City of the Bay. The penniless Mets vs. the World Champion Giants.

Truth hurts, Mets fans.

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January 14, 2015 6:00 am

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: First Basemen

20

Craig Goldstein

Sizing up the position from now through the 2017 season.

For last week’s edition, follow the link below:
Three-Year Rankings: Catcher

A few notations before diving right into the rankings. These are not BP consensus three-year ranks. These are Craig Goldstein’s three-year ranks and you’ll soon see why that distinction is important. I think it’s fair to say that my rankings are considerably different than those of the BP fantasy staff at large.


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January 8, 2015 6:00 am

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: The Top 50 Catchers

27

Bret Sayre

Taking the long view on fantasy backstops.

The Primer:
Because dynasty league rankings are relatively league-dependent, I set up parameters for ranking the players below (and the ones who will follow at other positions). The list here presupposes a 16-team standard dynasty format, in which there are no contracts/salaries, players can be kept forever, and owners have minor-league farm systems in which to hoard prospects. So feel free to adjust this as necessary for your individual league, whether it’s moving non-elite prospects without 2015 ETAs down if you don’t have separate farm teams or moving lower-risk, lower-reward players up in deeper mixed or -only formats.

Catcher is a highly divergent position, and it leads to a slightly different ranking style than other positions—which we’ll get to over the course of this series. The fact that these rankings are designed for one-catcher leagues (those of you in two-catcher leagues can bump up any player either in the majors or who gets dinged for their defense) helps make the band of usefulness at the major league level smaller than a position where you could start a player at either a mash position (CI/MI) or at a utility spot. The low ceiling of the average fantasy catcher and the high floor of the average waiver wire catcher puts the focus more clearly on upside at the plate. Of course, it’s also mildly offset by the fact that catching prospects are often slow to develop both in the minor leagues and in their early careers.


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January 7, 2015 6:00 am

Get to Know: Catcher Prospects

14

Craig Goldstein

These backstops need further seasoning, but they could hold fantasy value in the coming years.

Prospects are a tricky bag altogether, and while pitching prospects get the fancy acronyms (TINSTAAP), it’s worth noting just how hard it can be to accurately peg a future stud catcher, especially in fantasy. It’s a demanding position that saps strength, and makes it nigh impossible to be consistent offensive force. This makes what guys like Buster Posey and Jonathan Lucroy do year in and out all the more impressive.

It also makes investing in catching prospects extremely difficult. Remember when Matt Wieters was Mark Teixeira at catcher? Where did you have Yan Gomes ranked as a prospect? In fact, Ben Carsley made the case against investing in the position outside of deeper dynasty leagues in September. That is with the caveat that you can’t entirely ignore the position, and to that end we want you to be as informed as possible when you’re choosing who to ignore and who to target. We’ve broken the prospects you need to know into names for 2015 (immediate value) and 2016-and-beyond (long-term value). Still, there aren’t any catching prospects I’d be investing in as a fantasy starter for 2015 alone, a la Travid d’Arnaud last year.

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December 12, 2014 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Shortening Your Dynasty Rebuild

9

J.P. Breen

A look at some ways to get your team back in contention post haste.

Dynasty leagues with extensive minor-league rosters have become more popular in recent years. It’s one of the greatest ways to keep all owners engaged throughout the season, as the action never quits. However, such intensive and deep leagues can be intimidating for first-time owners. For example, I joined my first dynasty league in 2014, and it wasn’t with a bunch of amateurs. I jumped into the deep end and participated in TDGX—a 20-team, 40-man roster dynasty league with fantasy experts from across the internet baseball landscape.

It was my first dynasty draft and my first attempt at fielding my own team. Needless to say, it didn’t go smoothly. I made rookie mistakes in the draft. Grabbing elite prospects is important because the league includes a 10-man minor-league roster, but I erred and drafted prospects too early. That made my big-league roster far too shallow.

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December 2, 2014 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Keeper Decisions

4

Nick Shlain

Resolving a few hypothetical dilemmas involving Kole Calhoun, Kevin Gausman, J.D. Martinez, and Angel Pagan.

Although inspired by a real event, the following story is fantasy and does not depict any actual person or event.

We’re completely entrenched in the slog that is six months without real baseball, but that doesn’t mean fantasy owners are bereft of all decision-making. It’s the time of year when keeper-league owners must make a call on which players they’ll have back next year.

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September 25, 2014 6:00 am

They Hold No Quarter: Starting Pitchers

1

BP Fantasy Staff

These hurlers aren't widely owned, but they might be useful fliers for keeper-league owners looking ahead to 2015.

If there’s anything we love more than baseball around here on the fantasy staff, it’s collaborating with each other. So, at the behest of myself, we’re going to be doing one final group series of the year to close out the last seven weeks of the season. For this series, we will each select one player who is below 25 percent owned in either ESPN or Yahoo! leagues who could be someone to consider grabbing before the end of the season with an eye toward a keeper spot. Now, given the depth we’re dealing with here, these recommendations are not for owners who can keep five or seven players from season-to-season—it’s more for those of you who play in leagues where keepers take up more than half of your roster (and possibly more, in the case of some recommendations contained within).

Kevin Gausman, Baltimore Orioles
“In most years, Gausman's 3.57 ERA would be enough to advertise on its own, but in 2014, it was barely above league average, and he didn't have a ton of peripheral value, which probably explains why he's unowned in the vast majority of leagues despite a ton of prospect hype. Still, there's a lot to like here, and it's based mostly on pedigree and raw ability more than it is borne out in the numbers.


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September 3, 2014 6:00 am

They Hold No Quarter: Shortstops

2

BP Fantasy Staff

These players aren't widely owned, but they might be useful fliers for keeper-league owners looking ahead to 2015.

If there’s anything we love more than baseball around here on the fantasy staff, it’s collaborating with each other. So, at the behest of myself, we’re going to be doing one final group series of the year to close out the last seven weeks of the season. For this series, we will each select one player who is below 25 percent owned in either ESPN or Yahoo! leagues who could be someone to consider grabbing before the end of the season with an eye toward a keeper spot. Now, given the depth we’re dealing with here, these recommendations are not for owners who can keep five or seven players from season-to-season—it’s more for those of you who play in leagues where keepers take up more than half of your roster (and possibly more, in the case of some recommendations contained within).

Wilmer Flores, New York Mets
“Flores is owned in a hearty 0.2 percent of ESPN leagues, and it's not terribly difficult to see why. The 23-year-old is hitting just .237/.271/.312 in 182 PA this season, knocking out just two homers and driving in only 16 runs in the process. Even for a player with shortstop eligibility that's pretty bad, but there's reason for optimism moving forward. Flores hit .323/.367/.568 in Triple-A this season after being similarly effective last year, and while Las Vegas is a hitter-friendly environment, some of the underlying skill here is real. The fear with Flores has long been that he'd be relegated to a position much lower on the positional value scale, but the Mets are still running him out at shortstop we're he'll be eligible in all formats at least for next year. Flores won't challenge for a top-10 fantasy SS finish by any means, but if he's given 500-plus PA next year it's not crazy to think he could hit .270 with 10-plus homers and around 60 runs and RBI apiece. That's starting to look like a pretty valuable player in deeper leagues, and I prefer him to the likes of a Yunel Escobar, Stephen Drew, or a Jordy Mercer, as uninspiring as those names may be.” —Ben Carsley


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August 20, 2014 6:00 am

They Hold No Quarter: Second Basemen

4

BP Fantasy Staff

Part two in the position-by-position look at players who might be worth stashing in keeper leagues.

If there’s anything we love more than baseball around here on the fantasy staff, it’s collaborating with each other. So, at the behest of myself, we’re going to be doing one final group series of the year to close out the last seven weeks of the season. For this series, we will each select one player who is below 25 percent owned in either ESPN or Yahoo! leagues and who could be someone to consider grabbing before the end of the season with an eye toward a keeper spot. Now, given the depth we’re dealing with here, these recommendations are not for owners who can keep five or seven players from season-to-season—it’s more for those of you who play in leagues where keepers take up more than half of your roster (and possibly more, in the case of some recommendations contained within).

Arismendy Alcantara, Chicago Cubs
“It's been a debut befitting a hyped 22-year-old prospect for Alcantara, which is to say he's struggled mightily to adjust to big-league stuff. His .213/.280/.346 line and .240 TAv have barely produced value in even the deepest of leagues to date. But none of this should be of any concern to managers with an eye on 2015 and beyond. The pedigree is still that of a perennial top-10 second baseman, and his double-digit pop and 30-plus-steal potential has already flashed in the majors despite his overall struggles. While there is a possibility that the Cubs' surplus of organizational depth could land him in the outfield it's all but certain he'll be in Chicago's starting lineup on Opening Day next spring, and he'll be there with 2B eligibility. He's one of the best flyers around for a Rendon-esque leap in value in his first full season and he makes for a strong end-game waiver claim or FAAB target if he's available in your keeper league.” —Wilson Karaman


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August 13, 2014 6:00 am

They Hold No Quarter: First Base

7

BP Fantasy Staff

In the first edition of a weekly series, the fantasy crew picks little-owned first baseman who might be worth grabbing for 2015 and beyond.

If there’s anything we love more than baseball around here on the fantasy staff, it’s collaborating with each other. So, at the behest of myself, we’re going to be doing one final group series of the year to close out the last seven weeks of the season. For this series, we will each select one player who is below 25 percent owned in either ESPN or Yahoo! leagues who could be someone to consider grabbing before the end of the season with an eye toward a keeper spot. Now, given the depth we’re dealing with here, these recommendations are not for owners who can keep five or seven players from season-to-season. They’re more for those of you who play in leagues where keepers take up more than half of your roster (and possibly more, in the case of some recommendations contained within).

Yonder Alonso, San Diego Padres
“There was a point, earlier this season, when Alonso was just about the worst player in baseball. It’s not that hard to pinpoint either. On May 8, Alonso went 0-for-4 against the Marlins to sink his batting line to a cringe-worthy .157/.183/.217. That’s terrible for the best fielding shortstop you’ve ever seen, and Alonso is certainly not that. However, what he’s done since will probably surprise you, since he’s been left for dead in just about all fantasy leagues (including Mike and my LABR team) for the last three-plus months. In the 48 games he’s played in since that fateful day that his OPS touched .400 (he was sidelined for over a month with a wrist injury, Alonso has been exactly the player the fantasy owners who drafted him in the pre-season had hoped—hitting .303/.353/.533 with seven homers, 20 extra-base hits and four steals in 152 at-bats. Project that out over the course of a full season, and you get a little tingly inside when you hit the “add” button in your deeper mixed league.” —Bret Sayre


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July 17, 2014 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Midseason Keeper League FAAB Strategy

8

Jeff Quinton

A look at how you should spend your free agent budget in keeper leagues to maximize value.

I was originally going to write this article on the impact of the winner’s curse on FAAB bidding, but in Google-checking my ideas before beginning to write them up, I came across this Erik Siegrist article. Am I the biggest fan of the name Eric(k) ending with a K? No. Is the article excellent and a must-read for those in keeper leagues? Absolutely. Does the article’s excellence make me feel self-conscious as a fantasy baseball writer? Yup (he pretty much wrote the article I wanted to write and wrote it better than I imagined I would). Anyhow, go read it.

The part I wish to expand on is midseason strategy. Come midseason, the FAAB market in keeper leagues tends to be markedly different than the market in the beginning of the season. Players who can help teams in the hunt almost always go above “keeper” value, leaving only players who will be of seemingly no use this year to potentially go at value or at a bargain. We have seen before that at this time of the year, when the goals of owners in keeper leagues diverge, discussion of strategy is important. Consequently, we will briefly discuss the winner’s curse and how that should impact the decision-making of owners depending on their competitive position.

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July 2, 2014 6:30 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Minor League Draft Pick Valuation

4

Jeff Quinton

As the peak of trade season approaches, it's worth thinking about how much prospect selections are actually worth.

Many a keeper league has a minor league draft to supplement the major league draft or auction; the trading of minor league draft picks is fairly common practice in these leagues. Often serving as the final pieces to help balance a trade, the value of these picks can range from incredibly valuable to having almost no value depending on the structure and rules of the league. Proper valuation of minor league draft picks is thus critical when making a trade that includes these draft picks. Today we look at several key factors to take into account when trading away or trading for draft picks. By looking at these factors, I mean that there are typed words on them below:

Number of minor league slots in the league (Minor League Depth)
The more minor league keeper spots in a league, the less valuable the picks become. All other variables made equal, the minor league picks in a 16-team league with four minor leaguers per team are more valuable than the picks in a 16-team league with five minor leaguers per team. Why? Because, in theory, the top 64 (16x4) fantasy prospects would be owned in the first league, whereas the top 80 (16x5) prospects would be owned in the second league. Therefore, come next year’s minor league drafts, more top prospects would be available in the first league than the second league. Also, prospects that make significant improvements—the ones that jump up real and fantasy lists—are less likely to be owned in the first league than the second league. What are not different between the two leagues, generally, are the top prospects available from the most recent MLB minor league draft. Because prospects from the most recent MLB minor league draft are usually the best players for our fantasy minor league drafts (with the exception being the previously mentioned un-owned players that have made large strides), the first handful of picks in minor league drafts will be the same regardless of minor league depth. The true difference in value of minor league draft picks, as determined by minor league depth, is thus the value of the picks that follow these top picks from the MLB minor league draft. In leagues with shallow minor league depth, a bottom first round pick will probably be a top-50 fantasy prospect. In leagues with deep minor league depth, a bottom first round pick might not be a top 100 fantasy prospect.


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