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Articles Tagged Juan Pierre 

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September 20, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Taking Advantage

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Dan Fox

Revisiting baserunning metrics to see how much credit, if any, should go to runners when a pitcher makes a mistake.

"We don't have a 40 home run guy anymore... We have to reduce mistakes, take advantage of every opportunity we get... We need to improve on moving runners over from second to third and our base running. There can be an eight- to 10-game swing in a season just from base running."
--Syd Thrift, in 2001, when he served as the Orioles Vice President of Baseball Operations


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Willy Taveras' run at a bunting record has Dan pondering the when, why, and how often as far as bunting for base hits.

"He just pointed at the ball. That's all he could do."
Willy Taveras, commenting on his bunt single against the Yankees' Roger Clemens on June 20th.


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December 6, 2006 12:00 am

Player Profile

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Marc Normandin

Oh Lucky Pierre, bringing the joy of replacement level to your friendly neighborhood ballpark, and all for just $8.8 million per.

Juan Pierre was drafted in round thirteen of the 1998 amateur draft out of the University of South Alabama by the Colorado Rockies. This came after the Seattle Mariners attempted to draft him in both 1995 and 1996, to no avail. Pierre impressed at Low-A Portland thanks to a .352 batting average and a .368 Batting Average on Balls in Play. BABIP is higher in the low minors due to poorer defenses and pitchers who are not quite as skilled as their major league counterparts. The Northwest League is high-offense and above sea level, but .368 is still too lofty to be accounted for entirely by that.

Pierre would only spend two and-a-half seasons at the minor league level before reaching the majors with Colorado, and there were a few things that remained static during his minor league tenure: high batting averages, low slugging percentages, and inflated BABIPs:

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September 7, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: The Running Man

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Dan Fox

Dan starts to bring it all home in his look at baserunning, as he tallies up each of his metrics and shows us the best and worst runners from 2000-2005.

So we've finally reached a turning point in our series on quantifying baserunning. Since mid-July we've developed a methodology and framework for crediting baserunners for advancing on ground outs (Equivalent Ground Advancement Runs, or EqGAR), advancing on outs in the air (Equivalent Air Advancement Runs, or EqAAR), and attempted stolen bases as well as pick offs (Equivalent Stolen Base Runs, or EqSBR). This week we'll look at total picture and evaluate which players got the most and least from their legs over the past six years.

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September 5, 2005 12:00 am

Swinging for the Fences

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Will Carroll and Mike Carminati

Will Carroll and Mike Carminati wonder if swinging and missing is that big of a deal, and their findings may surprise you.

Just as an out-of-the-blue bolt of plate discipline presaged Sosa's assent, his decline might have been predicted by his tendency to swing and miss that haunted him even in his stellar 1999 season. Sosa swung at and missed 475 pitches in his record-setting 1999 campaign. This is the highest total for any major-league batter over the last five seasons and isn't the "swing and a miss!" call of the announcer the cruelest fate in baseball? But what does it mean in the greater scheme?

Does having a tendency to swing and miss more than most impair a batter's productivity as we have been told since Little League? Do batters with better batting eyes tend to be more productive than the average batter? Is it better to be patient at the plate or go for the first pitch you can hit? Does this data tell us anything new and could that be used to help build a better team or find successful players?

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The 17th installment of Joe Sheehan's excellent newsletter appeared in my inbox last night, and it featured analysis of the big, weird Rockies-Marlins-Braves deal that was hinted at last week and finally agreed upon--pending approval from the commissioner's office--this weekend. In analyzing the deal, Joe puts the Rockies in the winner's column and gives the Marlins a goose egg.

The 17th installment of Joe Sheehan's excellent newsletter appeared in my inbox last night (drop Joe some email if you're interested in subscribing), and it featured analysis of the big, weird Rockies-Marlins-Braves deal that was hinted at last week and finally agreed upon--pending approval from the commissioner's office--this weekend. In analyzing the deal, Joe puts the Rockies in the winner's column and gives the Marlins a goose egg. Here's an excerpt from the Marlins section:

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March 8, 2002 2:31 am

The Daily Prospectus: Rocky Mountain High

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Joe Sheehan

I spent a few hours this morning on the air with Mike Rosen of KOA Radio in Denver. Looking back on the segment--which included Rockies president Kelly McGregor and owner Jerry McMorris--I realize that I probably didn't articulate just how optimistic I am about this team this year. In an NL West with no great team, the Rockies are a good one, and perfectly capable of winning the division.

I spent a few hours this morning on the air with Mike Rosen of KOA Radio in Denver. Looking back on the segment--which included Rockies president Kelly McGregor and owner Jerry McMorris--I realize that I probably didn't articulate just how optimistic I am about this team this year. In an NL West with no great team, the Rockies are a good one, and perfectly capable of winning the division.

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