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July 28, 2009 12:27 pm

You Could Look It Up: Exhuming McCarthy, Burying Omar

49

Steven Goldman

The controversy over who's been saying what to whom in New York doesn't obscure a problem with accepting responsibility.

If you're a student of Cold War politics, or perhaps just a fan of early R.E.M., Monday's Omar Minaya press conference announcing the termination of Mets Vice President of Player Development Tony Bernazard might have had a familiar ring to it. The moment came when Minaya deviated from his "I'm not going to get into the details" stance to accuse New York Daily News beat writer Adam Rubin of writing reports on Bernazard's inappropriate behavior because, "Adam, for the past couple of years, has lobbied for a player development position."

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When I was little, I thought sportswriters had the coolest job in the world. I couldn't wait to grow up to become a baseball beat writer, or the next great writer for Sports Illustrated, or an author who could talk about cool stuff like the 1927 Yankees. I wanted to be them. I hate myself now for thinking that way.

When I was little, I thought sportswriters had the coolest job in the world. I couldn't wait to grow up to become a baseball beat writer, or the next great writer for Sports Illustrated, or an author who could talk about cool stuff like the 1927 Yankees. I wanted to be them.

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