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Articles Tagged Jordany Valdespin 

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Notes on prospects playing abroad, including Tigers first baseman Jordan Lennerton and Mets outfielder Cesar Puello.

The Good

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Notes on prospects who stood out abroad yesterday, including Jorge Polanco and C.J. Cron.

Prospect of the Day: Jorge Polanco, 2B, Twins (Leones del Escogido, DWL): 3-5, R 2 2B. Doubles power is probably the best the Twins are going to consistently get out of Polanco, but he has the bat speed to hit a lot of them. If he hits close to .300 and hits the spacious gaps at Target Field, he could be an above-average offensive player at a key defensive position. That’s a nice player.

Good

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June 13, 2013 5:00 am

Skewed Left: Bayes and the Hit By Pitch

10

Zachary Levine

Ian Kennedy, Zack Greinke, and the probabilistic approach to determining intention.

When home plate umpire Clint Fagan made the decision not to eject Zack Greinke for hitting Miguel Montero with a pitch, and a subsequent decision to eject Ian Kennedy for hitting Greinke with a pitch, he was answering a couple of probability questions that umpires and eventually Major League Baseball will have to face.

It’s not a question of whether the hit by pitch was intentional or not. You’re never able to answer that question. The probability that the act was intentional from the point of view of the umpire/disciplinarian is never 0, even on the most innocuous-looking play, and it’s pretty much never unless Cole Hamels is just begging for a suspension.

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