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Articles Tagged Joe Torre 

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02-10

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6

Purpose Pitches: Farrell, Mattingly, and Roenicke
by
Christina Kahrl

10-05

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5

Another Look: Joe Torre and Casey Stengel
by
Bob Hertzel

09-24

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3

On the Beat: Raising Arizona
by
John Perrotto

09-22

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13

On the Beat: Something to Build On
by
John Perrotto

12-31

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3

The Year in Quotes
by
Alex Carnevale

10-22

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54

Prospectus Today: Outskipper'd
by
Joe Sheehan

10-16

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3

Prospectus Hit and Run: Left Too Long
by
Jay Jaffe

10-07

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers versus Cardinals LDS
by
Jay Jaffe

09-27

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3

On the Beat: Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

02-02

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4

The Week in Quotes: January 26-February 1
by
Alex Carnevale

10-14

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Popping the Lidge Early
by
Jay Jaffe

10-11

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11

Prospectus Today: NLCS Game Two and ALCS Game One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-08

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12

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers versus Phillies
by
Jay Jaffe

10-01

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21

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers versus Cubs
by
Christina Kahrl

02-17

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0

Every Given Sunday: The Bronx Challenge
by
John Perrotto

11-05

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 29-November 4
by
Alex Carnevale

10-22

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0

You Could Look It Up: Joe Torre in a Box
by
Steven Goldman

10-08

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 1-7
by
Alex Carnevale

10-04

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Yankees versus Indians
by
Jay Jaffe

09-03

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0

The Week in Quotes: August 26-September 2
by
Alex Carnevale

07-16

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0

The Week in Quotes: July 8-15
by
Alex Carnevale

05-01

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0

Prospectus Today: Pinstriped Firestorms
by
Joe Sheehan

04-10

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0

Who Will Rid Me of This Pestilent McCovey?
by
Brandon Isleib

10-31

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0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-04

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-17

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 10-16
by
John Erhardt

10-04

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0

Playoff Prospectus: New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
by
Christina Kahrl

10-19

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0

Prospectus Today: Wow!
by
Joe Sheehan

04-20

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0

He Yam What He Yam
by
Andrew Baharlias

03-01

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-23

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0

Prospectus Today: Game Four
by
Joe Sheehan

09-30

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Minnesota Twins vs. New York Yankees
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Defending the Bandwagon
by
Jonah Keri

10-01

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Anaheim Angels vs. New York Yankees
by
Jeff Bower

07-16

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0

The Daily Prospectus: Ten Days, One Column
by
Joe Sheehan

04-15

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0

The Week in Quotes: April 8-14, 2002
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-25

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0

World Series Prospectus
by
Joe Sheehan

10-17

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Playoff Prospectus
by
Joe Sheehan

03-24

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Transaction Analysis: March 14-22, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

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October 4, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day One

0

Joe Sheehan

The A's and Padres give us a dog day afternoon, but the Yankees stick to the plan at night.

The big story was the continuing tear of Frank Thomas, who hit two homers to account for the early lead and the insurance run in the ninth inning. What is most impressive about the two shots is how different the pitches were, and how they showed the broad range of Thomas' still-impressive batting skills.

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Players react to the officiating in the Angels-White Sox series, the coaching staff turnover begins, and White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen is just...wow.

"He swung at the ball, and it was strike three. I caught the ball, so I thought it was an out."
--Angels catcher Josh Paul, on the controversial dropped third strike in Game Two (Chicago Sun-Times)

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Christina previews the Yankees/Angels series, who are perfectly poised to exploit each other's weaknesses.

Lineups (AVG/OBP/SLG/EqA/VORP)

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October 19, 2004 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Wow!

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Joe Sheehan

Just when you think this postseason can't get any more dramatic, along comes a day like October 18.

While I watched Sunday night's 12-inning game with a bemused detachment, able to appreciate the great story that was the Red Sox comeback and eventual win, that was gone by the time Tom Gordon entered Monday's contest. In short order, I was reduced to the 16-year-old kid in the #23 jersey, posters on the walls, lucky bat in hand, pacing the halls while screaming about the 1-1 pitch that should have been called a strike.

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April 20, 2004 12:00 am

He Yam What He Yam

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Andrew Baharlias

My one and only conversation with Joe Torre took place during a lunch break about two weeks after the Yankees were eliminated by the Cleveland Indians in the 1997 Division Series. My impressions at the time were clouded by the kind of star-struck feelings that a little boy might have upon meeting with his hero. Yet, Joe Torre was not my hero so I cannot explain my nervousness. I don't think it was merely shyness around a celebrity, because I think I would be in perfect control of myself if Burt Reynolds or Gavin McLeod appeared out of nowhere and criticized my lifelong policy of yam avoidance. In any case, weeks later my nervousness would be forgotten, and I would remember only his poise and how smooth, persuasive and in-control he was during our brief yam encounter. I don't want to make too much of this, but clearly this was a man whose courage had been tested under fire. A different man might have been more timorous when it came to mocking another man's side dish. Torre handled the whole encounter with aplomb, genial, yet forceful, like Gary Cooper. Shockingly, he seemed not at all intimidated by the inequality that existed between us--he being only the manager of the New York Yankees while I was the proud owner of a juris doctorate--and you can bet that if I had been Ken Kaiser, the Wookie from "Star Wars," or GMS III himself, he would have forthrightly made the case for yams as if he cared nothing at all for his own job security and everything for the nutritional lives of his co-workers.

My one and only conversation with Joe Torre took place during a lunch break about two weeks after the Yankees were eliminated by the Cleveland Indians in the 1997 Division Series.

My impressions at the time were clouded by the kind of star-struck feelings that a little boy might have upon meeting with his hero. Yet, Joe Torre was not my hero so I cannot explain my nervousness. I don't think it was merely shyness around a celebrity, because I think I would be in perfect control of myself if Burt Reynolds or Gavin McLeod appeared out of nowhere and criticized my lifelong policy of yam avoidance. In any case, weeks later my nervousness would be forgotten, and I would remember only his poise and how smooth, persuasive and in-control he was during our brief yam encounter.

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Miguel Cabrera has a bright future ahead of him--at least according to PECOTA. Bernie Williams had a bit of a tummy ache; luckily Kenny Lofton is there to pick up the slack. And the Pirates have a slew of questions to answer regarding their pitching staff. All this and much more news from Florida, New York, and Pittsburgh in your Monday edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Computers like Cabrera: Surfing PECOTA cards is one of the most fun things a baseball fan can do in the off-season. Marlins fans will note that Miguel Cabrera has one of the brightest projected futures of any player. The system seems to think he's going to do well in the next two years, and then become one of baseball's best players from 2006 on. The high end of his forecast would make him one of the elite players in baseball, while the worst case... well, as with any player, it's awful. But many players only get the not-so-bad forecast, the expected bad forecast, and the really awful forecast.
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    October 23, 2003 12:00 am

    Prospectus Today: Game Four

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    Joe Sheehan

    Dear Aaron Boone: It was a home run, not diplomatic immunity. Love, Joe Boone, whose Game Seven home run won the ALCS and sent the Yankees to the World Series, has been swinging at pitches he has no hope of hitting ever since then. I looked it up, expecting to see that Boone has taken about four pitches in the World Series. It turns out that he'd actually let 25 baseballs go by in the first three games, just shy of half of the 51 pitches he'd seen. He's pushed counts to 3-2 in a number of at-bats, so it's hard to make the argument that he's not being patient enough. That said, he was horrific last night. The Yankees' three biggest chances to win the game landed in his lap, and he approached his at-bats as if it were fifth-grade gym class or a co-ed softball league with some goofy rules like "swing or you're out." Against Carl Pavano in the second inning, with the bases loaded, one out and the Yankees down 3-0, Boone swung at the only two pitches he saw and flied to center field on the second one. Sacrifice flies down three runs with the pitcher coming up arenít team baseball, they're a lifeline for the opposition. Boone got another chance in the ninth, after Ruben Sierra's triple tied the game. Boone again went up hacking, fouling off the first and third pitches he saw to fall behind 1-2, then grounding out weakly to shortstop after two more foul balls. Finally, in the 11th inning, Boone again batted with the bases loaded and one out. And just as he had against Pavano and Ugueth Urbina, he made Braden Looper's job easy by hacking at fastballs up and in, pitches he doesn't have the bat speed to hit. Boone swung at six of the seven pitches he saw, looked completely overmatched, and struck out. Three at-bats, two pitches taken out of 15 seen, three times falling behind in the count, three outs. Boone needed to have a solid approach last night, and his mental effort was completely lacking, leading to wild swings that gave the pitchers all the leverage they needed to get out of jail.

    Maybe not.

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    September 30, 2003 12:00 am

    Playoff Prospectus: Minnesota Twins vs. New York Yankees

    0

    Joe Sheehan

    The line you can't stop reading in advance of this series is that the Yankees have dominated the Twins over the past couple of seasons, winning all 13 games between the two teams. Never mind that the Twins were winning back-to-back division titles, never mind that the Yankees didn't get as deep into last October as the boys from the Twin Cities did: that 13-0 is the statistic on everyone's mind right now. Here's the problem: it's meaningless information. In fact, it's actively deceptive, and using that data to form an opinion on the Division Series matchup is wrongheaded. First of all, forget about 2002. While baseball teams have more year-to-year continuity than teams in other sports--and these two rosters have been particularly stable--the idea that games played nearly 18 months ago will somehow provide insight into ones played this week is silly. Moreover, the last time the Yankees and Twins faced each other was on April 21, 2003. How long ago was that? Shannon Stewart was a Blue Jay. Johan Santana was imprisoned in middle relief. Matt LeCroy was a benchwarmer. Four of the seven games were started by Joe Mays and Rick Reed, neither of whom will be anywhere near the mound in this series. The Twins who take the field tomorrow will bear little resemblance to the ones who went 0-7 against the Yankees nearly a season ago. They're better at the plate and on the mound, and judging them as if they were that hapless bunch isn't analysis, it's laziness.

    Here's the problem: it's meaningless information. In fact, it's actively deceptive, and using that data to form an opinion on the Division Series matchup is wrongheaded.

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    The scene outside Edison Field Saturday following the Angels' first playoff series win in its 42 years of existence was unlike any I'd ever seen.

    The scene outside Edison Field Saturday following the Angels' first playoff series win in its 42 years of existence was unlike any I'd ever seen. SUV after SUV whizzing by, piloted by soccer moms, hordes of kids peeking out back seat windows, waving Rally Monkey dolls and Satan Sticks--inflatable red noise makers handed out to fans that'll have me seeing an ear doctor for the next oh, 10 years or so.

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    October 1, 2002 12:33 am

    Playoff Prospectus: Anaheim Angels vs. New York Yankees

    0

    Jeff Bower

    This is a match-up of opposites in many ways, not the least being the teams' post-season histories. The Yankees have won the World Series 26 times, including four of the past six years. To achieve a similar level of dominance, the Angels would have had to win 10 championships in their 41 years of existence. Instead, they enter the playoffs with the most meager post-season tradition of any Divisional Series participant, with three first-round exits in as many tries.

    This is a match-up of opposites in many ways, not the least being the teams' post-season histories. The Yankees have won the World Series 26 times, including four of the past six years. To achieve a similar level of dominance, the Angels would have had to win 10 championships in their 41 years of existence. Instead, they enter the playoffs with the most meager post-season tradition of any Divisional Series participant, with three first-round exits in as many tries.

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    July 16, 2002 12:31 am

    The Daily Prospectus: Ten Days, One Column

    0

    Joe Sheehan

    Last Tuesday night around 9 p.m., my mother asked me how I was planning to write about the All-Star Game if I wasn't watching it. I told her that I wasn't writing my column while away, and that I wouldn't write about the All-Star Game when I returned because no one cared about the All-Star Game past about 10:30 a.m. the next day. You can't make this stuff up, folks.

    True story #1:

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    Quotes on taking swings, lineups, managing and more.

    TAKING SWINGS

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