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Articles Tagged Joe Morgan 

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02-12

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6

Wezen-Ball: The Night Pete Rose Broke the Record
by
Larry Granillo

07-09

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67

Baseball Therapy: Hire Joe Morgan
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-18

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51

The Platoon Advantage: All Done With All-Time Teams
by
Michael Bates

03-12

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15

Wezen-Ball: "Baseball for Dummies", by Joe Morgan
by
Larry Granillo

07-25

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12

Prospectus Hit and Run: Stuck in the Middle with You
by
Jay Jaffe

07-23

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Hallworthy Alomar and Blyleven
by
Jay Jaffe

05-25

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17

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders II: Did Ernie Banks Write the Book of Love?
by
Steven Goldman

04-22

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7

On the Beat: Nyjer Morgan, Enigma
by
John Perrotto

03-29

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17

Transaction Analysis: Trading Up from Dickerson to Morgan
by
Christina Kahrl

11-09

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4

Another Look: The Joe Morgan Trade
by
Bob Hertzel

09-28

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4

Overthinking It: Closing in on the Bases
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-21

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52

Prospectus Hit and Run: Alomar, the Crime Dog, the Big Cat and Big Mac
by
Jay Jaffe

07-28

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9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Return of the Rickeys
by
Jay Jaffe

02-22

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11

Prospectus Q&A: George Thorogood
by
David Laurila

01-27

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33

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Curious Case of Jeff Kent
by
Jay Jaffe

01-07

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Greg Rhodes
by
David Laurila

11-01

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: My First Full Season
by
Dan Fox

09-25

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0

Prospectus Toolbox: Doubled Up
by
Derek Jacques

09-01

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0

Crooked Numbers: In Reverse
by
James Click

08-08

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0

The Week in Quotes: August 1-7
by
John Erhardt

04-06

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0

Prospectus Game of the Week: New York Mets @ Cincinnati Reds, 4/4/05
by
Jonah Keri

01-16

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1

Trading a Superstar
by
Mark Armour

01-06

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0

The Class of 2004
by
Jay Jaffe

06-11

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0

Littleball
by
Mark Armour

03-11

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0

Breaking Balls: Changing the Rules
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-03

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0

Breaking Balls: The Griffeys
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-18

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The Daily Prospectus: On the Other Hand...
by
Joe Sheehan

03-24

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Transaction Analysis: March 14-22, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

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July 28, 2009 12:48 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: Return of the Rickeys

9

Jay Jaffe

The Rickey conversation takes new turns, answering who's least like the speedster among active players, and most like him historically.

Rickey Henderson's much-anticipated Hall of Fame induction speech may have disappointed those who yearned for a proclamation of all-time greatness, perhaps accompanied by a bronze plaque hoisted high overhead. Instead, Henderson took his place among the game's greats with a performance on Sunday that balanced humor and humility, with nary a third-person reference to be heard.

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February 22, 2009 1:01 pm

Prospectus Q&A: George Thorogood

11

David Laurila

A famous rocker talks about one of his other great loves beyond music: baseball.

There are baseball fans, and then there is George Thorogood. An icon in the music world, Thorogood is not only a passionate Mets fan, he is also a walking-and-shouting baseball historian. A former second baseman with the semi-pro Delaware Destroyers, Thorogood has multiple gold records to go with his baseball pedigree, not to mention a reputation as one of the best live performers on the blues-and-rock circuit. About to hit the road for yet another tour, Thorogood shared his thoughts on performance-enhancing drugs, the brilliance of Sandy Koufax, and what it was like to talk baseball with the legendary John Lee Hooker.

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January 27, 2009 11:43 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Curious Case of Jeff Kent

33

Jay Jaffe

The argument for Kent's election to the Hall of Fame has its merits, but also its mysteries.

There's no crying in baseball, which may or may not explain why Jeff Kent's stoic facade crumbled during the press conference in which he announced his retirement last week. A notoriously gruff and prickly personality, Kent had spent the better part of two decades distancing himself from his teammates and the media as much as possible. Thus the sight of him fighting back the tears was surprising, even shocking, given his apparent lack of emotional range. As the legendary sportswriter Frank Graham once wrote of Yankees outfielder Bob Meusel, "He's learning to say hello when it's time to say goodbye."

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January 7, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Greg Rhodes

0

David Laurila

The Reds official historian shares his knowledge of Cincinnati baseball and its key figures, including Fred Hutchinson and Bob Howsam.

Greg Rhodes is the official team historian of the Cincinnati Reds. Formerly the executive director of the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum, Rhodes is the co-author of six books on the Reds and a two-time winner of The Sporting News-SABR Baseball Research Award. David talked to Rhodes about some of the key figures, and events, in Reds history.

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November 1, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: My First Full Season

0

Dan Fox

Memories of this fan's rite of passage engender a look back at 1977 on the bases.

"This team, it all flows from me. I'm the straw that stirs the drink. Maybe I should say me and [Thurman] Munson, but he can only stir it bad."
-Attributed to Reggie Jackson in the May 1977 issue of Sport magazine.


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September 25, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Toolbox: Doubled Up

0

Derek Jacques

Who are the rally killers, and how many different ways do they kill rallies?

Welcome back to Prospectus Toolbox-our weekly look at the statistical tools we use to analyze baseball. This week, we're taking a quick look at an event that can completely change the outcome of an inning, wrecking rallies or bailing out the pitcher, depending on your point of view. It's the double play, also known as the twin killing, or the pitcher's best friend.

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September 1, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: In Reverse

0

James Click

Our view of the season would be very different if it had played out exactly in reverse to reality. James rewinds the year, and shows us how.

The length of the baseball season can easily obscure some important trends that are developing. Teams like the A's get noticed because their rise from the depths has been so dramatic that it breaks free of the mass of information built before its arrival. But there are may other trends that can easily escape our eyes because so much of the season has already passed.

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Gary Sheffield sounds off about leadership, Yogi Berra doesn't know what salsa is, Ken Griffey Jr. and the Reds bring joy in a time of sorrow, and Joe Morgan mourns the loss of a simpler game. Oh, and some guy named Palmeiro got busted for something.

"That's not for me to determine. I hope that people look at my whole career and appreciate that I have given everything I've got. I respect the game, I respect my opponents, I respect the players who have come before me."
--Orioles first baseman Rafael Palmeiro, on whether he still belongs in the Hall of Fame (Baltimore Sun)

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Game of the Week kicks off the regular season with a look at the traditional Opening Day game in Cincinnati, as the Reds battle the Mets.

Barely a minute into the broadcast, Morgan is in playoff form. First he takes the Reds to task for batting Ken Griffey Jr. second, saying he should be a middle-of-the-order hitter with his ability. OK, fine. And then: "Griffey's due for some good luck...I think you'll see Griffey hit 40 or 50 home runs this year." Uh, the same guy who tears his hamstrings if he so much as contemplates the works of Kant, the same Griffey who hit 41 homers...in the last three years combined? If you squint really hard, you can see a fruit basket by Morgan's side in the press box, with the inscription: "The check's in the mail, Your Old Pal, Ken Griffey, Sr."

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January 16, 2004 12:00 am

Trading a Superstar

1

Mark Armour

This past December, the Texas Rangers and Boston Red Sox almost pulled off a swap of Alex Rodriguez and Manny Ramirez, with assorted lesser players and suitcases of cash also reportedly involved. While this was going on, there were countless media references to this deal being "the biggest trade in baseball history." This is a pretty bold statement, obviously, but these are some pretty big names so you didn't hear a lot of protest or debate about the claim. Teams have been trading baseball players for 140 years or so, and many of these trades have involved 10 or more players changing sides. Of course, that is not what makes the A-Rod/Manny trade "big"; its bigness rests with its star power, with both principles being among the best players in the game and somewhere near mid-career. Setting aside Ramirez for a moment, how often is a player of the caliber of Alex Rodriguez traded at all? Not bloody often, obviously, since there have not been very many players as good as Rodriguez, traded or not. This article will attempt to identify these rare deals, where a team has a superstar talent and decides to trade it away. For our purposes a "trade" requires one or more players to move in each direction. Babe Ruth was not traded from the Red Sox to the Yankees, he was sold. Eddie Collins and Frank Baker were sold by the Athletics. What's more, we are not interested in deals where money was an overriding component of the transaction. In 1935, Jimmie Foxx was dealt from the Athletics to the Red Sox in a two-for-two trade, but a check for $150,000 came the other way. The players the A's received were of little import--Connie Mack wanted the 150 grand. This codicil similarly eliminates deals involving such superstars as Tris Speaker, Joe Jackson, Pete Alexander, Lefty Grove, and Johnny Mize.

Teams have been trading baseball players for 140 years or so, and many of these trades have involved 10 or more players changing sides. Of course, that is not what makes the A-Rod/Manny trade "big"; its bigness rests with its star power, with both principles being among the best players in the game and somewhere near mid-career. Setting aside Ramirez for a moment, how often is a player of the caliber of Alex Rodriguez traded at all? Not bloody often, obviously, since there have not been very many players as good as Rodriguez, traded or not.

This article will attempt to identify these rare deals, where a team has a superstar talent and decides to trade it away. For our purposes a "trade" requires one or more players to move in each direction. Babe Ruth was not traded from the Red Sox to the Yankees, he was sold. Eddie Collins and Frank Baker were sold by the Athletics. What's more, we are not interested in deals where money was an overriding component of the transaction. In 1935, Jimmie Foxx was dealt from the Athletics to the Red Sox in a two-for-two trade, but a check for $150,000 came the other way. The players the A's received were of little import--Connie Mack wanted the 150 grand. This codicil similarly eliminates deals involving such superstars as Tris Speaker, Joe Jackson, Pete Alexander, Lefty Grove, and Johnny Mize.

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January 6, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2004

0

Jay Jaffe

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, there are few topics more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?" And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise. With that being said, I thought it would interesting to see what some of Baseball Prospectus' newly updated measures of player evaluation had to say on the topic. For the uninitiated, BP's Davenport Translated Player Cards measure a player's value above replacement level for offense, defense, and pitching while adjusting for context--park effects, level of offense, era, length of season, and in Clay's own words, "the distortions caused by not having to face your own team's defense." The Davenport Cards offer the most sophisticated statistical summaries available; if you can adjust for it, it's in there. The basic currencies of the Davenport system, whether it's offense, defense, or pitching, are runs and wins, more specifically, runs above replacement level and wins above replacement level.

With the 2004 STATLG-L Hall of Fame balloting now in the books, and the results of the BBWAA voting slated to be released this afternoon, few topics are more prominent in baseball fans' minds than "Which players will make it to Cooperstown in 2004?"

And rightfully so. Enshrinement in the Baseball Hall of Fame is the highest honor a former-player can receive, and most fans are protective of that: a fact that has spurned countless heated debates over the years--rational, objective, and otherwise.

Read the full article...

June 11, 2003 12:00 am

Littleball

0

Mark Armour

As one might expect, the success of Michael Lewis's great new book, Moneyball, has led to a number criticisms of Oakland Athletics' GM Billy Beane, his staff, and their entire organizational philosophy. These criticisms should not have come as a surprise: Lewis presents Beane as a brilliant visionary operating in an antiquated system peopled, for the most part, with morons. There may be a great deal of truth to this, but the idea that some of Beane's competitors would be defensive is understandable. The most interesting criticism of the Athletics' success is that as impressive as their regular season results have been, their style of play cannot succeed in the playoffs against quality competition. Sure, the Athletics win 100 games every year with one of the lowest payrolls in the game, but if they can't win in the post-season, what good is it? This turns out to be a convenient critique since the A's have lost in the first round of the playoffs for the past three seasons. This criticism is not new, of course. Joe Morgan has been saying similar things for the last year or so: The A's offense, which has relied mainly on reaching base and hitting home runs, is not effective in the post-season facing quality pitching. A team needs to be able to "manufacture runs"--steal bases, bunt, hit behind the runner, etc. The A's do not, or cannot, do these things, so they are doomed to fall short in the playoffs. Or so the argument goes.

The most interesting criticism of the Athletics' success is that as impressive as their regular season results have been, their style of play cannot succeed in the playoffs against quality competition. Sure, the Athletics win 100 games every year with one of the lowest payrolls in the game, but if they can't win in the post-season, what good is it? This turns out to be a convenient critique since the A's have lost in the first round of the playoffs for the past three seasons.

This criticism is not new, of course. Joe Morgan has been saying similar things for the last year or so: The A's offense, which has relied mainly on reaching base and hitting home runs, is not effective in the post-season facing quality pitching. A team needs to be able to "manufacture runs"--steal bases, bunt, hit behind the runner, etc. The A's do not, or cannot, do these things, so they are doomed to fall short in the playoffs. Or so the argument goes.

Read the full article...

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