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Articles Tagged Jim Murray 

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05-02

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6

BP Unfiltered: Adam Dunn and the Infield Fly Rule
by
Sam Miller

11-02

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0

Wezen-Ball: Player Rankings for Type A/B Calculations, 1982-1984
by
Larry Granillo

07-22

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Cooperstown's Backhanded Compliment
by
Jay Jaffe

05-12

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2

Between The Numbers: Good Days for Debuts
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

09-08

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7

Prospectus Hit and Run: Cooperstown Bound
by
Jay Jaffe

03-17

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3

One-Hoppers: Willie Davis (1940-2010)
by
Jay Jaffe

12-29

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35

Prospectus Hit and Run: Throwing Rice
by
Jay Jaffe

02-14

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What We Learned
by
Will Carroll

08-07

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Prospectus Hit and Run: Home Cooking and the Combo Platter
by
Jay Jaffe

05-29

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0

Transaction Analysis: AL-brand Catsup
by
Christina Kahrl

02-08

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0

Prospectus Today: The Ordonez Deal
by
Joe Sheehan

01-05

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2004 Internet Hall of Fame
by
Neal Traven

10-23

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Prospectus Triple Play: Baltimore Orioles, Colorado Rockies, New York Mets
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-28

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Under The Knife: Achieving Immortality
by
Will Carroll

04-09

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Transaction Analysis: March 25-April 6, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

07-19

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Transaction Analysis: June 25-July 14, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

06-12

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Transaction Analysis: June 9-10, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

05-13

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Transaction Analysis: April 30-May 11, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

03-21

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Transaction Analysis: March 14-18, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

12-10

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HACKING MASS Results
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-06

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Transaction Analysis: August 31-September 4, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

06-14

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Transaction Analysis: June 8-11, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

05-16

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Transaction Analysis: May 11-14, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

03-24

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Transaction Analysis: March 14-22, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

09-25

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Transaction Analysis: September 14-22, 1999
by
Christina Kahrl

09-03

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Transaction Analysis: August 28-31, 1999
by
Christina Kahrl

08-30

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Transaction Analysis: August 24-27
by
Christina Kahrl

07-21

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Transaction Analysis: July 17-19, 1999
by
Christina Kahrl

06-27

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Transaction Analysis: June 22-25
by
Christina Kahrl

05-23

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Transaction Analysis: May 19-21
by
Christina Kahrl

04-03

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Transaction Analysis: March 22-April 1
by
Christina Kahrl

03-22

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Transaction Analysis: March 8-21
by
Christina Kahrl

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The Infield Fly Rule is easy to explain.

Cycling is, above all, a team sport, and the tactics involved are as complicated as those of baseball or basketball. "Ever try to explain the infield fly to somebody?" Armstrong asked me when we were in Texas, where he lives when he is not racing or training in Europe. --New Yorker, 2002

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How players were ranked in the free agent compensation procedure in its first years, from 1982-1984.

The free agency season is among us. Major League Baseball released the list of the 100+ free agents over the weekend and we've already seen some action, with C.C. Sabathia opting out of his contract with the Yankees only to re-sign with the Bombers less than twelve hours later. It's a crazy season.

It's also the season when everyone gets to discuss and argue about the less-than-useful Type A and Type B free agent rankings Major League Baseabll gives out each year. For those who follow MLB Trade Rumors, this week's release of free agent rankings wasn't all that surprising, as they have been running their own version of the calculations for years now. For the rest of the baseball-watching public, though, the free agent ranking process is about as clear as Bryce Harper's eye-black. It doesn't help that MLB makes it difficult - if not impossible - to find the formula anymore.

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The Hall of Fame has quietly removed the writers and broadcasters from the annual Sunday ceremonies.

Technically, they're not Hall of Famers. The broadcasters and writers honored by the National Baseball Hall of Fame are recipients of the Ford C. Frick and J.G. Taylor Spink Awards, the highest honors in their respective fields. Voted upon on an annual basis by a committee of previous award winners, historians, and columnists in the case of the former, and by the Baseball Writers Association of America in the case of the latter, they are recognized at the Cooperstown mecca not with the bronze plaques that players, managers, executives, and pioneers receive, the ones that hang in the hallowed Hall of Fame Gallery. Rather, a portrait of each recipient is included in the "Scribes & Mikemen" exhibit in the Hall's library. As the Class of 2011 is inducted this weekend, those honorees are being pushed even further from the limelight.

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When in the season do most valuable players tend to debut, and what can consecutive Opening Day starts reveal?

Armed with a WARP database, I trekked back to my debut article on MLB debuts. Here are the dates on which a group of players worth at least 100 career WARP debuted, as well as the names of the players who contributed the most to those totals:

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September 8, 2010 8:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Cooperstown Bound

7

Jay Jaffe

Jim Thome has never been considered among the game's elite players but his home run and walk totals make him worthy of the Hall of Fame.

One year ago, Jim Thome was almost a forgotten man. Traded by the White Sox to the Dodgers just prior to the August 31 waiver deadline, he was a fish out of water in the National League, instantly reduced to a pinch-hitting role by his inability to play the field and even further limited by a bout of plantar fasciitis. Including the postseason, Thome went just 5-for-20—all singles—with a walk and three RBI for the Dodgers. Since the team fell short of the World Series, he didn't get to serve as designated hitter in the Fall Classic, the primary job for which he was acquired. At 39 years old, he looked like he might be done.

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The longtime Dodger's accomplishments were often obscured by one terrible inning amid a prime spent in the most parched scoring environment on earth.

Willie Davis was before my time. Davis spent 18 seasons in the major leagues, from 1960 through 1976, with a brief comeback in 1979 after a foray to Japan, so unless he made a cameo appearance in an Angels game I was watching in that latter year — he wasn't in this Nolan Ryan near no-hitter, which I fondy recall — I never actually saw him play. I knew of him primarily because of one gruesome inning in the 1966 World Series in which Davis set a record for October futility, making three errors. The moment represented the fall of the Sandy Koufax-era Dodgers' mini-dynasty, as Davis lost one fly ball in the sun, dropped the next ball, and then overthrew third base on the same play, leading to a three-run inning in a 6-0 loss.

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December 29, 2008 1:07 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: Throwing Rice

35

Jay Jaffe

Fear and loathing on the Cooperstown trail.

In evaluating the Hall of Fame candidacies of Rickey Henderson and Tim Raines recently, I made a point of avoiding any discussion of Jim Rice for a simple reason: his candidacy doesn't merit being mentioned in the same breath. That's not to say that Rice wasn't an excellent ballplayer, but his relatively short career and the context surrounding it simply leave his case wanting. The BBWAA clearly feels otherwise, as Rice polled 72.2 percent of the vote last year, the ninth straight year he's received above 50 percent. Still, he fell 16 votes shy in his second-to-last year on the ballot. With his candidacy in its final year and surrounded by such controversy, we'll take a closer look at his case.

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February 14, 2008 12:00 am

What We Learned

0

Will Carroll

However much drama there was, yesterday's action on the Hill left most questions unanswered.

All documents referred to in this piece are available at this link. I will try to be as detailed as possible in referring to the documents when possible.

Ignore, if you can, the hearings themselves. For that, you could use the phrase that some Congressmen found so inexplicable: "It is what it is." There was what appeared to be a clear, partisan divide on the Oversight Committee, with the Democrats, led by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA) tending to side with Brian McNamee, and with the Republicans tending to side with Roger Clemens. While the questions tended to be focused on credibility rather than policy, about divining truth rather than evidence, the documents that the Oversight Committee collected between their last hearing and this one are stunning in their breadth and openness. In direct opposition to the Mitchell Report, the Congressional collection comes with such a degree of transparency that it's almost startling. At one point, C.J. Nitkowski is promised that they would attempt to keep his conversation confidential; it wasn't much of an attempt, because his statement in full is available without even the slightest redaction. Whether it was the relatively predictable and unenlightening statements, questions, and answers that are now part of the record, the documents published after the hearing are anything but.

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August 7, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Home Cooking and the Combo Platter

0

Jay Jaffe

Frying up some interesting splits on the all-time home run leaderboard and team pitching performances.

Home Cooking

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May 29, 2007 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: AL-brand Catsup

0

Christina Kahrl

Swinging over to the junior circuit, Christina tries to make some sense of some roster disasters and damage control.

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February 8, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The Ordonez Deal

0

Joe Sheehan

Even if Magglio Ordonez was completely healthy, his contract would be ridiculously out of line.

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January 5, 2004 12:00 am

2004 Internet Hall of Fame

0

Neal Traven

In this, our 13th year, the STATLG-L Internet Hall of Fame balloting demonstrates anew the uncertainties involved in trying to decide whether Player X or Player Y has the credentials to merit your vote for induction into the Hall. There were a number of intriguing questions to be answered this time around, dealing with both first-year eligibles and holdovers from last year. We recorded a total of 2363 ballots in this year's edition of the STATLG-L IHOF, appreciably less than last year's record total and even a bit lower than the number of ballots cast two years ago. I don't think we can blame this drop on the absence of a Veterans Committee ballot this year, and I won't speculate about other possible reasons for the decline. I must report, however, that I personally did less shilling for the event than I've done in previous seasons, so maybe some of the decrease can be laid at my own feet. The average number of names on a ballot was 5.83, very similar to last year's 5.96 and well above the 5.18 names per ballot a year earlier. Given the total number of ballots recorded this time, the 75% threshold was set at 1773 votes while the 5% gateway for retention on the ballot (if we, rather than the BBWAA, made that decision) came to 119 votes.

We recorded a total of 2363 ballots in this year's edition of the STATLG-L IHOF, appreciably less than last year's record total and even a bit lower than the number of ballots cast two years ago. I don't think we can blame this drop on the absence of a Veterans Committee ballot this year, and I won't speculate about other possible reasons for the decline. I must report, however, that I personally did less shilling for the event than I've done in previous seasons, so maybe some of the decrease can be laid at my own feet. The average number of names on a ballot was 5.83, very similar to last year's 5.96 and well above the 5.18 names per ballot a year earlier. Given the total number of ballots recorded this time, the 75% threshold was set at 1773 votes while the 5% gateway for retention on the ballot (if we, rather than the BBWAA, made that decision) came to 119 votes.

The most important question, as always, was whether any of the first-time candidates could garner enough votes for induction. The answer to that is a resounding yes. Heartiest congratulations to both leading vote-getter Dennis Eckersley (1940 votes, 82.1%) and Paul Molitor (1888 votes, 79.9%), who easily topped the required vote total and demonstrated that at least one kind of relief pitcher and one designated hitter belong in the STATLG-L Hall of Fame. No other first-timer got anywhere close to the goal. In fact, the only other newbie who finished ahead of any of the holdover candidates was @#$% Joe Carter (sorry, the Phillies fan in me surfaced for just a moment), whose 118 votes rounded to 5% even though it's actually a mere 4.994%.

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