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Articles Tagged Jered Weaver 

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06-07

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12

Fantasy Starting Pitcher Planner: Week 11
by
Paul Sporer

04-09

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1

BP Unfiltered: Angels Lose Weaver
by
R.J. Anderson

03-20

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7

Pebble Hunting: Watching Jered Weaver
by
Sam Miller

09-24

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0

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, September 24
by
Matthew Kory

09-18

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5

Out of Left Field: The Slowest Pitches Thrown This Year
by
Matthew Kory

08-13

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7

Pebble Hunting: The Zack Greinke Parlour Game
by
Sam Miller

08-10

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1

BP Unfiltered: A PITCHf/x Companion Piece on Jered Weaver
by
Dan Brooks

08-10

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4

Pebble Hunting: The Best Pitches Thrown This Week (By Jered Weaver)
by
Sam Miller

07-27

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18

Raising Aces: Violent Trends
by
Doug Thorburn

06-14

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9

Future Shock: Picking Pitchers
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-21

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26

Pebble Hunting: Baseball and the F Word
by
Sam Miller

05-07

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8

What You Need to Know: Monday, May 7
by
Daniel Rathman

05-03

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0

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, May 3
by
Matthew Kory

05-03

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0

What You Need to Know: Thursday, May 3
by
Daniel Rathman

04-04

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23

Raising Aces: Pitchology 101
by
Doug Thorburn

09-30

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89

Regular-Season Awards
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-25

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7

Divide and Conquer, AL West: The Jered Weaver Ripple Effect
by
Joey Matschulat

08-11

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6

Clubhouse Confidential: The King of Pop
by
Marc Carig

07-27

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9

Expanded Horizons: The Mystery of Jered Weaver
by
Tommy Bennett

07-01

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50

All-Star Selections
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-07

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9

Checking the Numbers: Weaver's Soaring Strikeout Rate
by
Eric Seidman

10-31

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0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-07

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0

Prospectus Notebook: Angels, Braves, Rangers
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-20

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Jered Weaver
by
Jason Grady

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June 7, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Starting Pitcher Planner: Week 11

12

Paul Sporer

Cole Hamels snapped a six-start losing streak, and he stays in the auto-start ranks as Paul looks ahead to next week.

Welcome to the Weekly Pitching Planner. Each week I will cover the pitchers are who slated to make two starts and help you decide who you should start and who you should sit. Sometimes guys will be in the “consider” where they might have one good start, but a second tough one and then your league settings might determine whether or not you should go forward with him. The pitchers will be split by league then by categories:

Auto-Starts – These are your surefire fantasy aces. You paid a handsome sum for them either with an early draft pick or high dollar auction bid so you’re starting them anywhere, anytime. Guys can emerge onto or fall off of this list as the season evolves. There won’t be many – if any – notes associated with these groupings each week. We are starting them automatically so why do I need to expound on how awesome they are and will be in the coming week?

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How will the Angels fare without their ace?

Angels ace Jered Weaver will miss at least the next four weeks after fracturing the elbow in his glove arm during his most recent start, Sunday night in Texas, according to ESPN.

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Jered Weaver's arm slot might be back to where it was several years ago. What would that mean?

One of my plans for the 2013 season is to try to watch baseball like a scout would. Buy a thousand index cards, jot down notes on each player in each game, throw some numbers on the tools, and file them away. I figure the practice will give me more discipline, help me focus on the process in each play, and leave stronger impressions on my mind about what I watched.

Of course, I don’t have nearly the knowledge or technique to actually scout, but ideally this will be a start toward picking up things that I'd like to pick up. For example, it might have been nice to have noticed this:

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September 24, 2012 10:22 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, September 24

0

Matthew Kory

Ten days to go, and 17 teams still have at least a thump in their playoff odds.

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Answering that question is not quite so simple as you'd think.

The last time I was at a Spring Training game, I tossed down a couple bucks for charity, threw dignity to the winds, and stepped into the radar gun tent.  I used the first two pitches to ramp it up before letting fly for reals on the third: 72 mph. I carried my beer left-handed for the rest of the day.

I bring that up because you should understand who is writing this, but mostly because speed is sexy. We all love to watch a 100 mph pitch because it’s amazing but also because it’s rare. Most major league pitchers, let alone internet writers, can’t throw that fast no matter how many times we embarrass ourselves in front of small children throws we make. When at a game, we count the number of pitches that break 100. For example, take a look at this Aroldis Chapman fastball:

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August 13, 2012 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Zack Greinke Parlour Game

7

Sam Miller

Zack Greinke is famous for experimenting on the mound. How extraordinary is the range of his repertoire?

In 2005, Baseball Prospectus ran perhaps the giddiest, glowingest comment in BP Annual history. It was more than 500 words, and it was about a pitcher who, according to PECOTA, had a 0 percent collapse rate and a 63 percent improve rate:

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Jered Weaver has turned himself into a lefty-killer. Dan looks at how he has changed his approach.

In an article today, Sam Miller explored some of Jered Weaver’s best pitches. Sam noted how Weaver’s results have changed vs. left-handed hitters, and then showed some of Weaver’s best two-seam fastballs and curveballs from his recent start.

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Jered Weaver is way better than he used to be, but all his improvement has come against left-handed hitters. This is how he's done it.

I remember this Angels-Yankees game from 2009 because MLB.tv decided to let me watch it. I was in the blacked out area for Angels games, which was unfortunate, because I had just convinced my boss to pay for my MLB.tv so I could watch Angels games. And then this game played with no restrictions. I thought maybe it was where I was sitting in the building, that I had found a 10-square-foot pocket of Southern California that was somehow outside the law, like a tiny baseball Reservation. I tried for a month but never found it again. That’s why I remember this game. 

The Yankees’ lineup that day had Derek Jeter, followed by eight hitters who batted left-handed or switch-hit. This mattered because Jered Weaver was pitching, and everybody knew that Jered Weaver was lethal against righties but vulnerable to lefties, who hit .276/.335/.477 against Weaver that year. Against lefties that year, Weaver was a below-average pitcher. Against righties, he was an ace. Overall, he was not an ace.

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Doug looks at what pitching experts mean when they call a delivery "violent," and why this violence can be inextricable from success.

Baseball is a funny sport. We live in an age when athletes are paid handsomely to challenge the physical boundaries of competition, and when pitcher velocity is paramount, yet the most damning label that a baseball hurler can earn is of having a “violent” delivery. Developing pitchers face a natural dichotomy where an increase of velocity essentially requires an associated uptick of kinetic energy, and the resulting mechanics run the risk of being perceived as violent, and as potential red flags for injury. The ingrained link between fastball velocity and injury risk was echoed in Dr. Glenn Fleisig's interview with Ben Lindbergh last month, and the time has come for the baseball-viewing public to appreciate this connection and to accept that the athletes with the most extreme skills will naturally run the greatest risk for injury, and are therefore dependent on mechanical efficiency for their survival.

Professional pitchers must endure some mixed messages as they adjust to the demands of playing ball across many levels, dealing with coaches whose advice can seem contradictory at times. One minute a pitcher is being told not to “rush” his delivery from the windup, and the next minute he is listening to the coach tell him to use a slide step from the stretch in order to hurry the motion with runners on base. Pitchers are being drafted, signed, and acquired with an increasing emphasis on fastball velocity, but teams are hesitant to sign off on a pitcher whose mechanics appear to require considerable effort to achieve that velocity.

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June 14, 2012 9:32 am

Future Shock: Picking Pitchers

9

Kevin Goldstein

If you had to pick a pitcher for a big game tomorrow, who would you take? How about a big game in 2015? Some MLB execs weigh in with their choices.

On the surface, the question seems like an easy one: if your team were playing in a championship game tomorrow, and you could have any starting pitcher to pitch that game for you, who would it be? Your choice is of any ace in the game, but for some it's not just about statistics, it's about comfort and mitigating risk. The question was posed to 12 industry insiders, ranging from pro scout to general manager, and those twelve generated five different responses.

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Thirteen reasons why the national pastime isn't always rated PG.

When I moved up from the 11-and-12 league to 13-and-14, there was a 14-year-old kid named Andrade who had grown himself a pretty good mustache. He caught, and whenever a pitch would get past him, he would yell “F***” as he turned to retrieve the pitch. The first time I heard this, I was shocked, and almost embarrassed. I’d used my share of swears, but never like this, in front of grown-ups. I had no idea that swearing was possible on a baseball field.

Of course, swearing is very possible on a baseball field. Perhaps going back to 1898, major-league baseball has been a place where profanity has thrived. On-field microphones rarely pick up the audio (except in Boston, I've found), but the cameras are careful to catch foul lips in high definition. “Well, if you can read lips,” the announcers sometimes will say. “Hey you can’t say that you’re outta here,” the umpires sometimes will say. Mostly, though, we just move on and don’t talk about it. Let’s talk about it. Why not? We might as well talk about it. What follows is a taxonomy of 13 major-league F-bombs. NSFW? I honestly don't know.

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Fans were treated to weird baseball in Boston when the O's and Sox resorted to using position players as pitchers.

The Weekend Takeaway
Everyone loves a good dose of weird baseball, and that’s precisely what fans at Fenway Park were treated to on Sunday afternoon. The Orioles capped off their first sweep of the Red Sox in Boston since 1994, but that does not even begin to describe what transpired on Yawkey Way.

In one of the most bizarre goat-to-hero stories you will ever see, designated hitter Chris Davis hit like a pitcher… and then pitched like one, too. Davis began the afternoon by collecting a platinum sombrero, added a double-play ball in his sixth at-bat, and wound up 0-for-8 by the time the 17-inning marathon was over. But with the media preparing to make Davis the butt of many a Monday joke, Davis put the joke on the hometown nine, hurling two shutout innings to earn the win.


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