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Articles Tagged Jamie Moyer 

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If you had to bet on Jamie Moyer, Mark Prior or Scott Kazmir to win more games from today until the end of the world, on which pitcher would you bet?

On Aug. 23, 2004, Scott Kazmir made his major-league debut. He was 20 and one of the dozen best prospects in baseball. Three days later, Mark Prior struck out eight and beat the Astros. He was 23 and one of the half-dozen best pitchers in baseball. The same day that Prior won his game, Jamie Moyer gave up six runs to the Royals and lost his seventh decision in a row, a streak that would eventually stretch to 10 losses and push his ERA over 5.00. He was 41 years old.

And here we are in 2012, and each is attempting his own comeback. Moyer is pitching well in the Cactus League; Kazmir threw for scouts last month; Prior’s audition for major-league teams could come in the next few weeks. Based on what we knew through 2004, it is a surprise that all three are still pitching. Based on what we knew through 2004, it is a surprise that none of the three is on a major-league roster. Based on what we knew through 2004, it is a surprise that the band Bush is still releasing new music. Life is surprising, man. But the question before us is this:

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Which winter moves impressed the Baseball Prospectus staff the most?



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January 19, 2012 3:00 am

Transaction Analysis: A Tale of Four Starters

23

Ben Lindbergh

The Rangers make it official with Yu Darvish, the A's hope for another surprising season out of Bartolo Colon, the Diamondbacks bring back Joe Saunders, and the Rockies allow us to hope for more Jamie Moyer.

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June 30, 2010 8:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Jacktastic!

9

Jay Jaffe

How Jamie Moyer learned to stop worrying and love the bomb.

On May 6, Hall of Fame pitcher Robin Roberts passed away. Many nice things were said upon his shuffling off this mortal coil—staff leader of the 1950 "Whiz Kids," active in the formation of the players' union, all-around stand-up guy. But the most distinctive number attached to his 19-year big-league career was his 505 home runs allowed, the all-time record. Those dingers didn't stop Roberts from racking up 286 wins with a 3.41 ERA, a 113 ERA+, and 82.0 WARP, good enough to earn him a bronze plaque in Cooperstown in relatively short order.

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August 14, 2009 12:52 pm

Checking the Numbers: Anatomy of a Good Problem

3

Eric Seidman

The Phillies' newfound depth in the rotation might give the club another springboard for post-season success.

The Boston Red Sox entered the season with a surplus of starting pitchers under contract, some of whom were considered to be locks in the rotation, with others serving as insurance policies, spot starters, or deadline chits. Jon Lester, Josh Beckett, and Daisuke Matsuzaka were considered locks, and the final two spots were to split up between Tim Wakefield, Brad Penny, Clay Buchholz, John Smoltz, and Justin Masterson. What a difference a few months make. Dice-K has disappointed and attributed issues to training regimens lost in translation. Wakefield landed on the disabled list with back issues after getting his invitation to the All-Star Game. Penny has shown signs of life but is in the midst of a flaky, up-and-down campaign. Smoltz performed poorly enough that the team actually felt it necessary to sign Paul Byrd, and Masterson joined the Tribe as the main attraction in their return on Victor Martinez. Suffice to say, best-laid plans as they pertain to starting pitching depth are in no way guaranteed to come to fruition, and an abundant supply can become scarce almost overnight.

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March 18, 2009 2:07 pm

Checking the Numbers: The Man Who Broke PECOTA?

21

Eric Seidman

Jamie Moyer is so unique that he often baffles and defies attempts at analysis as readily as he has opposing batters.

Every offseason, when baseball news hits a lull and even an Esteban German signing seems interesting, the release of the PECOTA projections comes to the rescue and rejuvenates fans. Hordes of readers flock to the pages of their respective teams in order to assess the forecasts, seeing how their current talent stacks up with the competition. This year, the most controversial projection belongs to Orioles catcher Matt Wieters, but up until a week ago, an even more surprising "forecast" existed for Jamie Moyer. It turns out that he didn't have a PECOTA card, and the space usually reserved for it delivered a message that the web address in question could not be found. His projection is now available following an update, but until recently his unique career path made it difficult to come up with an accurate forecast.

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Jamie Moyer is an acquired taste. His fastball couldn't catch a Ford Festiva at top speed; his curve is good, but it doesn't have jaw-droppingly sharp movement; he has a unremarkable mound presence, generally stoic and composed; and is listed--ever-so-generously--at six feet, 175 pounds. Watching Moyer face one batter, you're probably not going to be impressed at all. After two, though, you start to notice exactly how slow he's throwing, how the change-up hangs up for what seems like entire seconds. Through a game, you'll see him work location and speeds and most likely come out of the game having pitched well, and probably not notice that he racked up five, six, or maybe even eight strikeouts--each of them on a pitch that you'd expect to see hit in the minors.

Jamie Moyer is an acquired taste. His fastball couldn't catch a Ford Festiva at top speed; his curve is good, but it doesn't have jaw-droppingly sharp movement; he has a unremarkable mound presence, generally stoic and composed; and is listed--ever-so-generously--at six feet, 175 pounds. Watching Moyer face one batter, you're probably not going to be impressed at all. After two, though, you start to notice exactly how slow he's throwing, how the change-up hangs up for what seems like entire seconds. Through a game, you'll see him work location and speeds and most likely come out of the game having pitched well, and probably not notice that he racked up five, six, or maybe even eight strikeouts--each of them on a pitch that you'd expect to see hit in the minors.

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