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Articles Tagged Jamie Moyer 

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December 13, 2012 9:16 am

In A Pickle: Winners and Losers of Winning and Losing

5

Jason Wojciechowski

Jason looks at a particular class of outliers among this year's pitchers.

Psst. I've got charts. You want charts? C'mere. Look. Look at this chart.

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Sam checks in on several of his articles from earlier this season to see whether what he wrote made sense.

July 18 is as good a time as any to go back and read old pieces to see whether they make a lick of sense in hindsight. It is as good a time as any because there is, from the writer’s perspective, no good time to do this without wondering why that thing was written in the first place. Baseball is really just a lifelong project to break down any sense of certainty you might have about cause and effect.

Nonetheless, let’s review a few of the conclusions I made in March, April, and May to see what new information tells us.

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July 3, 2012 5:00 am

Western Front: Ready, Set, No!

5

Geoff Young

Geoff compares members of the Tacoma Rainiers to Twilight characters using the 20-80 scale. Or maybe he would have, if he'd been able to see the team play.

“Who said that?”

“Nobody, I was just trying to make you feel better.”

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June 26, 2012 9:44 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Tuesday, June 26

1

Matthew Kory

The Jamie Moyer revenge tour rolls on, adds new target for revenge.

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Two quad-A sluggers are designated for assignment, and Jamie Moyer finds a new host city.

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The Rangers sign an aging pitcher while the Rockies let an ancient one go.

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May 8, 2012 8:56 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Tuesday, May 8

9

Matthew Kory

The Brewers are bad.

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The Rockies use one word to describe Jamie Moyer's return to the major leagues, and a conversation with Mike Matheny.

Jim Tracy is a man of many words. The Rockies manager can wax poetic about many of his players, both past and present, and is more than willing to give long and thoughtful answers to all baseball-related questions. However, when it comes to describing his number-two starter, Tracy keeps coming back to one word.

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April 25, 2012 8:45 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Wednesday, April 25.

0

Matthew Kory

Good teams, bad teams, Texas beats 'em all.

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April 23, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Bartolo Colon and the Comeback Kids

1

Jay Jaffe

Though recent trends might indicate otherwise, aged pitchers rarely return to form after year-long layoffs.

Sure, it came against an Angels lineup whose centerpiece, Albert Pujols, has yet to get untracked, but it was difficult not to be impressed with Bartolo Colon's eight shutout innings last Wednesday. For one thing, it marked the 38-year-old Oakland righty's second consecutive scoreless start; he had tossed seven scoreless against the Mariners on April 13. For another, he reeled off a streak of 38 consecutive strikes, running from the second pitch of the fifth inning through the seventh pitch of the eighth inning, a span that included balls in play; he allowed only a single and a double during that time. Pitch-by-pitch records only go back to 1988, so there's no definitive account of whether Colon set a record, but via the San Francisco Chronicle's Susan Slusser, the next-highest known total was 30 in a row by Tim Wakefield in 1998.

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Celebrating Jamie Moyer at the end of a week in which he became the oldest pitcher ever to win a major-league game.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

The 49-year-old Jamie Moyer won his first game since 2010 this week, becoming the oldest major-league pitcher ever to do so. We've been paying tribute to the ancient southpaw for years in articles like the one reproduced below, which originally ran as a "Breaking Balls" column on July 8, 2003, when Moyer was a mere 40 years old.
 


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Looking ahead to baseball's most significant personal achievements.

Something peculiar happened during the most recent National Football League season: four quarterbacks threw for more than 4,900 yards. An unprecedented event given that two quarterbacks had accomplished the feat in 30 years theretofore. The increased reliance on, and perfection of, the forward pass has led to an assault on the record books, akin to the earlier offensive explosion in baseball. There are no rumblings of wrongdoing in football—at least, around these new levels of performance—but then again, there weren’t during the early phases of baseball’s offensive breakout, either. Even heading forward, don’t expect a congressional hearing, or columnists pontificating about lost innocence while urging a nation to grieve and revolt. Because, as one intrepid—and sadly, unremembered—soul put it: nobody cares about football stats.

The inverse is true of baseball statistics. Anyone reading Prospectus is no stranger to numbers, or to the countless reasons why people are attracted to baseball’s numbers. At some point the large, round numbers became in-built measuring sticks. If a player hit 500 home runs over his career he must have been one of the best sluggers in history. A player with 3,000 hits or 300 wins demonstrated the perfect equilibrium between longevity and quality throughout his career. Exceptions existed before science entered the picture, but these rules were simple—and simple sells.

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