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Articles Tagged James Shields 

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03-26

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1

My Model Portfolio: Clayton Kershaw Leads the Way
by
Craig Goldstein

11-25

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2

Fantasy Team Preview: Kansas City Royals
by
Craig Goldstein and Paul Sporer

06-26

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10

Overthinking It: The Rays' Changeup Revolution
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-19

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28

Fantasy Freestyle: Time for a Change
by
Jason Collette

04-02

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3

Painting the Black: The First 24 Hours
by
R.J. Anderson

02-26

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2

Painting the Black: The Other Pitcher the Royals Got
by
R.J. Anderson

12-14

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21

BP Unfiltered: Which WAR(P) Are You?
by
Sam Miller

12-14

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17

Overthinking It: The Prospects Who Get Traded
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-11

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47

Overthinking It: The Royals, the Rays, and the Problem with Windows
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-11

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 99: Two More Reactions to the Rays-Royals Trade
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-24

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7

Overthinking It: The A's, the Rays, and Two Different Ways to Ball on a Budget
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-10

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2

Fantasy Beat: Shields' Plummeting Groundball Rate
by
Jason Collette

06-11

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1

Painting the Black: Going Backward to Move Forward
by
R.J. Anderson

05-01

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6

The Process: Post-Draft Rankings: You're Doing it Wrong
by
Bradley Ankrom

04-06

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9

What You Need to Know: Friday, April 6
by
Daniel Rathman

03-08

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24

The Lineup Card: 10 Choices for 2012 Declines
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-24

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14

Resident Fantasy Genius: Fantasy Rumor Mill for 10/24/11
by
Derek Carty

06-06

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12

Resident Fantasy Genius: HR/FB, SIERA, and Luck
by
Derek Carty

01-14

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14

Fantasy Beat: Starting Pitcher Underachievers
by
Jason Collette

09-24

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0

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Starting Pitchers
by
Bill Baer

06-30

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17

Fantasy Beat: SIERA Darlings
by
Marc Normandin

05-19

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8

On the Beat: Wednesday Update
by
John Perrotto

04-21

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0

Prospectus Q&A: James Shields
by
David Laurila

10-24

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5

On the Beat: Big Game James and Coming Up Big
by
John Perrotto

10-10

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Red Sox versus Rays
by
Christina Kahrl

01-30

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Player Profile: James Shields
by
Marc Normandin and Dan Fox

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March 26, 2014 6:00 am

My Model Portfolio: Clayton Kershaw Leads the Way

1

Craig Goldstein

The Dodgers' ace is the priciest player on Craig's Roto dream team.

On Friday, Mike Gianella released his latest mixed league Bid Limits, which spurred an idea from Bret Sayre called Model Portfolios, wherein the fantasy staff (and anyone else on the BP roster who wants to participate) will create their own team within the confines of a standard 23-man, $260 budget. The roster being constructed includes: C, 1B, 2B, 3B, SS, CI, MI, OFx5, UTx2, and Px9 along with the following standards issued by Sayre:

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November 25, 2013 6:07 am

Fantasy Team Preview: Kansas City Royals

2

Craig Goldstein and Paul Sporer

Newcomer Jason Vargas is just "a guy" in fantasy leagues, but the Royals boast several returning players who are worthy of your attention.

One of the songs of summer, if not the song of summer was Daft Punk’s Get Lucky. The electronic music duo’s smash hit also serves as the overriding factor of what determines fantasy champions over the course of a grueling baseball season. Call it chance, call it fortune, call it what you want to call it (wait, that’s a different song), luck is unavoidable. Either good or bad rolls of the dice affect all of us as we try to navigate our way through the labyrinth that is living vicariously through the accomplishment of others. But, as summer gave way to fall and fantasy playoffs ended, Get Lucky has given way to another pop hit… Royals by Lorde.

And baby I'll rule, I'll rule, I'll rule, I'll rule / Let me live that fantasy.

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There are certain rules about changeup usage. The Rays, unsurprisingly, aren't beholden to those rules.

“The game evolves constantly,” Tampa Bay Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey tells me on a Saturday afternoon at Yankee Stadium, after wrapping up a bullpen session an hour before first pitch. Evolution in baseball works a lot like it does in real life: traits that confer a competitive advantage tend to be passed on. But before a new approach is adopted around the league, Hickey says, “someone’s going to have to be successful doing it.”

The Rays are often that someone. If the Rays have an identity—aside from their status as a team that doesn’t draw, locked into a lease that never expires—it’s that they do things differently. Driven by their need to make the most of their limited resources and the creativity of their front office and field staff, the Rays under General Manager Andrew Friedman and manager Joe Maddon have authored a long list of innovations. Shifting more aggressively than almost any other team. Giving defensive specialist Jose Molina a starting job for the first time at age 37. Opening an academy in Brazil. Refusing to sign free agent starters (before Roberto Hernandez). And so on.

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June 19, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Time for a Change

28

Jason Collette

Jason looks at the pitchers who benefit most in leagues that count quality starts instead of wins and calls for commissioners to make the switch.

Earlier this season, Brian Kenny and Harold Reynolds infamously debated the value of pitcher wins.

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April 2, 2013 5:00 am

Painting the Black: The First 24 Hours

3

R.J. Anderson

Opening Day observations about James Shields, Jon Lester, Mike Moustakas and others.

Like many fans with MLB.tv access, I spent the first 24 hours of the new season binging on baseball. That meant taking in the Rangers-Astros, Red Sox-Yankees, and Royals-White Sox games. Along the way I wrote down some observations about a few players.

Jason Castro
PECOTA and I disagree on Castro's offensive outlook. The algorithm sees Castro hitting .238/.319/.351 with eight home runs this season in a hair fewer than 500 plate appearances. I'm more optimistic about the Stanford product and former first-round pick's chances of being an offensive asset independent of his position. Castro's problem to date has been an inability to hit same-handed pitching. He boasts a career True Average of .286 against righties and .113 against lefties—that's the difference between Jason Kubel and Lucas Harrell's 2012 offensive production. Castro did me no favors on Sunday night, going 0-for-4 against southpaws Matt Harrison and Joseph Ortiz. Still, I came away pleased with Castro's efforts behind the plate. 


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February 26, 2013 5:00 am

Painting the Black: The Other Pitcher the Royals Got

2

R.J. Anderson

What sort of arm can Kansas City expect in Wade Davis?

Not long ago Wade Davis placed near the top of prospect lists. At 6-foot-5 with a simple delivery and easy arm action Davis was the textbook power pitcher. He had a lively fastball that ranged into the mid-90s and could touch higher, a knee-buckling curveball, a solid slider, and a developing changeup. You weren't alone if you thought Davis could turn into a frontline pitcher. The Rays showed confidence in their young arm by refusing to trade him for Jason Bay or others, and by signing him to an extension after just 35 big-league starts. Success seemed like a birthright to Davis back then.

Davis reached the majors as a 23-year-old. In his first start in the majors he struck out nine batters, including three in a row to start the game—his first six outs were recorded via strikeout. After six starts Davis had a 118 ERA+ and a 2.77 strikeout-to-walk ratio. But that early success turned out to be a tease, a figment of small-sample magic, and not an omen. Davis would spend the next two seasons in the rotation looking average. He made 58 starts, posted a 90 ERA+, and struck out 1.74 batters per walk. Faced with an overcrowded rotation the Rays opted for Jeff Niemann over Davis last spring, then Alex Cobb over Davis when Niemann suffered an early-season injury. 

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Sometimes, the player-value models disagree, and you get to make a choice. Make that choice.

Much, perhaps too much, is made of the multiple models existent that attempt to characterize a player's value relative to replacement level. "A man with one watch always knows the time, while a man with two watches can never be sure," is an expression. Most of the time, though, WAR, WARP, and WAR are close allies. How good is Joey Votto? you might ask. And the answers you get: 

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December 14, 2012 12:00 am

Overthinking It: The Prospects Who Get Traded

17

Ben Lindbergh

Teams know their own prospects best, so should it be a red flag if they're willing to trade a top one? History suggests it is so.

Winning baseball teams—at least the ones without exorbitant payrolls—are usually powered by young, cost-controlled talent. And in the land of cost-controlled talent, the top prospect is king. Not only do elite prospects stand a good chance to be stars, but they promise to provide that production—which would cost a fortune to obtain from a free agent—for the league-minimum salary or something close to it.

Since top prospects are such valuable commodities, teams are reluctant to trade them without receiving huge hauls in return, so we rarely see them change organizations before they’ve had a chance to sink or swim in the majors. That’s why it was so strange to see two top prospects—Wil Myers and Trevor Bauer, each of whom either is now or has recently been a top-10 prospect in baseball—on the move this week.

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Was the Royals' strategy in their swap of Wil Myers and more prospects for James Shields and Wade Davis based on a broken windows theory?

Note: If you've already listened to today's episode of Effectively Wild, some of this may sound familiar.

If you think about it, the Royals and Rays, the two teams that completed a massive prospects-for-pitchers trade on Sunday, are a lot alike. Both teams are among the have-nots of the American League, competing with payrolls in the mid-60-millions (last season). Neither one draws well—in the Royals’ case, because of all the losing and because Kansas City is small, and in the Rays’ case, because of all the past losing, the newness of the franchise, and the ugliness and location of the ballpark, where it’s almost impossible to catch a foul ball without some painful and/or embarrassing consequence. To compensate for the lack of revenue, both teams try to draft, develop, and extend homegrown players as an alternative to paying for wins from free agents, and both have had among the finest farm systems in baseball for the past few seasons.

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Ben and Sam weigh in on the Rays-Royals trade involving James Shields and Wil Myers a day after the dust settles.

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Oakland's success this year is all the more surprising considering they have departed from the small-market blueprint perfected by Tampa Bay.

The Oakland A’s and Tampa Bay Rays, two AL Wild Card contenders who looked like long shots at the All-Star break, are one game into a strangely scheduled Thursday-Saturday series. The two teams have a few things in common, in addition to both being AL Wild Card contenders who’ll be playing tonight in Tampa Bay. In fact, they might have more in common than any other two teams in baseball. This article isn’t actually about the ways in which they’re the same. It’s about one way in which they’re different. But I’m going to start with the similar stuff just to make the different thing more meaningful, which is pretty manipulative of me.

The first thing the A’s and Rays have in common is success in the second half. The A’s were the hot team in July, when they went 19-5. They’ve cooled off lately, but they’re 24-14 in the second half, and their playoff odds have risen by roughly 25 percentage points over that period. The Rays are the hot team in August. They’re 16-5 this month and 25-14 in the second half, which has raised their playoff odds by roughly 50 percentage points.

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July 10, 2012 5:00 am

Fantasy Beat: Shields' Plummeting Groundball Rate

2

Jason Collette

A look at how the changing defense behind James Shields may be affecting the way he's approaching hitters and the success he's achieving.

James Shields picked up in 2012 where he left off in 2011, winning five of his first six decisions while posting an ERA of 3.05.  The first month of the season even saw Shields do something better than he had ever done in the past: generate groundballs.

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