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Articles Tagged Intimidation 

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August 22, 2012 5:00 am

Sobsequy: The Hidden Complexities of Baseball's Unwritten Rules

20

Adam Sobsey

In some cases, baseball's on-field etiquette seems clear, but there is often more to the story than either we or the players know.

On August 11 in Toledo, the Durham Bulls’ Will Rhymes hit a second-inning, two-run home run off of Toledo Mud Hens starter Drew Smyly. (If you watch the video above, you’ll see a replay of Rhymes’ homer partway through.)

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Revisiting historical HBP rates in the wake of Alex Avila's plunking by Jered Weaver's hand.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

As Jered Weaver prepares to serve his six-game suspension, take in some trends in HBP rates over time, which originally ran as a "Schrodinger's Bat" column on May 4, 2006.

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July 2, 2007 12:00 am

Watching the Detectives

0

Mike Carminati

Mike looks at how home teams and visiting teams are impacted by different umpires.

Mother, may I slug the umpire
May I slug him right away?
So he cannot be here, Mother
When the clubs begin to play?

Let me clasp his throat, dear mother,
In a dear delightful grip
With one hand and with the other
Bat him several in the lip.







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May 11, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Strike Zones, Trilobites, and a Vicious Cycle

0

Dan Fox

To stick with the theme, you might say that Dan's column on historic HBP rates engendered a massive retaliatory response from readers.

"If they knocked two of our guys down, I'd get four. You have to protect your hitters."
--

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May 4, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Beautiful Theories and Ugly Facts

0

Dan Fox

Dan takes a look at historical HBP rates.

“The great tragedy of Science--the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact.”
--British biologist Thomas H. Huxley (1825-1895)


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Steven chimes in on the Delmon Young fiasco, looking to history for a bit of guidance.

That Labor Day at Toledo, Derr was calling the plays at first base. The Mudhens had been leading the pennant race, but were in the midst of a losing streak that had dropped them out of first place; tempers were running short. When Derr called a Mudhen out on a close play at first base, Stengel came running out to argue. Whatever he said--use your imagination--it got him thumbed from the game. That was standard operating procedure. What happened next was new. Stengel didn't leave the field. He turned towards the stands and began conducting them like a band leader, exhorting them. Writing about it a few days later, John Kieran of the New York Times said,

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