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Articles Tagged Internet Hall Of Fame 

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01-17

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28

Overthinking It: Jorge Posada, the Hall of Fame, and the Fog of WARP
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-30

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: To Live and Die in Three Rivers Stadium, Or: The Face of Michael Cimino
by
David Raposa and David Roth

12-30

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Morris on the Ballot, Smith to Close
by
Jay Jaffe

07-23

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Hallworthy Alomar and Blyleven
by
Jay Jaffe

07-22

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Cooperstown's Backhanded Compliment
by
Jay Jaffe

07-12

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19

The BP Broadside: Memento Mori, Clarence Budington Kelland and Joe Crede
by
Steven Goldman

01-21

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-20

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13

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part I
by
David Laurila

01-06

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28

Prospectus Hit and Run: Blyleven in '11 and Other Tales from the Ballot
by
Jay Jaffe

12-20

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Starting Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

09-10

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Niehaus and Rick Rizzs
by
David Laurila

01-06

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

01-22

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28

Prospectus Hit and Run: Protracting the Process
by
Jay Jaffe

01-12

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

01-09

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0

Prospectus Today: Goose, Rice, and Confetti
by
Joe Sheehan

01-09

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0

Prospectus Hit and Run: Dissecting the 2008 Hall of Fame Vote
by
Jay Jaffe

01-03

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0

The Class of 2008
by
Jay Jaffe

12-16

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0

Every Given Sunday: The Official Response
by
John Perrotto

01-09

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0

The Class of 2007
by
Jay Jaffe

10-09

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 1-8
by
Alex Carnevale

12-12

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0

The Class of 2006
by
Jay Jaffe

08-22

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The Week in Quotes: August 15-21
by
John Erhardt

10-28

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0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Greg Spira

01-05

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2004 Internet Hall of Fame
by
Neal Traven

06-24

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Breaking Balls: Precedents
by
Derek Zumsteg

02-26

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Prospectus Feature: 2003 IHOF Veterans Committee Results
by
Neal Traven

02-26

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2003 IHOF Veterans Committee Results
by
Neal Traven

01-08

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2002 Internet Hall Of Fame Results
by
Neal Traven

01-07

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The Daily Prospectus: My Ballot
by
Joe Sheehan

02-16

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The Daily Prospectus: Measuring a Big Johnson
by
Joe Sheehan

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January 22, 2009 12:05 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: Protracting the Process

28

Jay Jaffe

Digging through what the outcome of this year's Hall of Fame voting means for those elected, and those still waiting to be.

We've reached the dog days of January, the deadest of dead spots on the baseball calendar. Free-agent signings are few and far between, trade activity is nearly non-existent, and a vast, bleak expanse of winter weeks still separates today from the renewal brought by pitchers and catchers reporting to camp. And it's also the time of year for one particular ritual, because no matter how long I prolong my post-BP annual, post-JAWS series hiatus, inevitably I'm left to pick through the Hall of Fame voting results before moving on to other topics.

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January 12, 2009 10:23 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Pitchers

10

Jay Jaffe

Wrapping up the JAWS rankings for this year's Hall of Fame eligibles.

Finally, we come to the pitchers on the BBWAA ballot for the Hall of Fame, a mercifully short list this time around, featuring four holdovers and three newcomers. Among this group, Bert Blyleven is the standout, and while he's certainly no lock to gain election this time around, he jumped to nearly 62 percent in last year's vote, suggesting that the work done by statheads here and elsewhere to boost his candidacy is finally getting through to the voters.

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The arguments for the second-place finisher on this year's BBWAA ballot have a few holes in them.

To no one's surprise, it was announced yesterday that Rich Gossage had been elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. One of the five best relief pitchers in history by any standard, Gossage picked up 85.8 percent of the vote (with "only" 75 percent required for election) in his ninth year on the ballot. Goose's omission from the Hall has stuck in his craw for some time, and he had been perhaps the player most vocal about his own status. With Bruce Sutter's induction in '06, however, Gossage's eventual ascension to immortality was assured. There's no better way to become a Hall of Famer than to have an inferior peer let into the room ahead of you.

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January 9, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Dissecting the 2008 Hall of Fame Vote

0

Jay Jaffe

What does the rising tide for Rice and the appalling lack of support for Rock Raines mean for the future?

The Goose is loose! The Hall of Fame voting results were announced on Tuesday afternoon, and as expected, Rich Gossage was the sole candidate to gain election, garnering 85.8 percent of the vote in his ninth year on the ballot. Jim Rice fell just 16 votes shy at 72.2 percent, followed by Andre Dawson (65.9 percent) and Bert Blyleven (61.9 percent).

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January 3, 2008 12:00 am

The Class of 2008

0

Jay Jaffe

A look at the starting pitchers on this year's Hall of Fame ballot.

Once again, Ye Olde Winter Workload kept me from reaching the pitchers' portion of the Hall of Fame ballot before the arrival of the New Year, not to mention the December 31 deadline for postmarking ballots. Nonetheless, with the election results not due to drop until January 8, there's still plenty of time for readers to play along at home.

The basics of JAWS remain the same for the pitchers as for the hitters: we consider a player's career and peak WARP totals--the latter defined as his seven best seasons--using the all-time version of our WARP3 metric. Just as the worst elected Hall of Famer at each position was eliminated in the process of determining the JAWS benchmarks, we'll exclude a similar percentage of pitchers--four out of 60, in this case. Four more (Dennis Eckersley, Hoyt Wilhelm, Rollie Fingers, and Bruce Sutter) are excluded for use in creating the reliever benchmark, known as RAJAWS (Reliever Adjusted JAWS); while Eckersley had a significant career as a starter, his overall numbers are so close to the JAWS benchmark for starters that including or excluding him doesn't move any measure more than a few runs. In examining these pitchers, we'll also use Pitching Runs Above Average (PRAA) as a secondary measure for "peak" in conjunction with PRAR's "career" proxy. A pitcher with many PRAA but fewer PRAR likely had a high peak and a short career, while one with the same number of PRAA but more PRAR likely had a longer career. Although durability should not be confused with excellence, league-average performance has value, as anybody who's ever suffered through a fifth starter's pummeling knows.

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December 16, 2007 12:00 am

Every Given Sunday: The Official Response

0

John Perrotto

Bud Selig and Don Fehr address what action will be taken, if any, in the wake of the Mitchell Report, while BBWAA members assess Clemens' Hall of Fame candidacy.

It has been three days since every serious baseball fan with an internet connection downloaded the 409-page Mitchell Report. Though the report certainly isn't light reading, enough time has passed to at least digest what was in the document, sort through the list of 89 current or former players linked to performance-enhancing drugs, and try to figure out what it all means. As George Mitchell, the former Senate Majority Leader who spearheaded the investigation into the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball, said, the game should use his report to look forward rather than retroactively punish players accused of cheating.

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January 9, 2007 12:00 am

The Class of 2007

0

Jay Jaffe

With the Hall of Fame announcement coming later today, Jay concludes JAWS' take on who should make it in by sizing up the pitchers.

We'll dispense with the introductory formalities (you can read last year's pieces here and here) and cut to the chase. As with the hitters, we'll consider career WARP and peak WARP--the adjusted for all time flavor, WARP3--with the latter defined as a pitcher's best seven years. Just as we eliminated the worst elected Hall of Famer at each position in determining the JAWS standards, we'll exclude a similar percentage of pitchers--four out of the 60, in this case. In examining these pitchers, we'll also use Pitching Runs Above Average (PRAA) because it forms a reasonable secondary measure for "peak" in conjunction with PRAR's "career" proxy. A pitcher with many PRAA but fewer PRAR likely had a high peak and a short career, while one with the same number of PRAA but more PRAR likely had a longer career. Although durability should not be confused with excellence, league average has value, as anybody who's ever suffered through a fifth starter's pummeling knows.

This year's pitching segment has one more wrinkle. On the advice of WARP creator Clay Davenport, the pitching portion of this year's edition of JAWS includes a downward adjustment for pitchers in the AL after 1973 to counteract the negative hitting contributions of their non-DH brethren. This prevents the system from overly favoring recent AL pitchers, but the consequence is that the career and peak JAWS scores won't match what you can pull from the DT pages on our site. I'd prefer the transparency, but in terms of evaluating the cases on the current ballot, the need for this "tax" wins out.

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Everybody's chatty in the Big Apple, Eric Chavez isn't quite sure what he's saying or how he feels, and much more.

HALL OF FAMER

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December 12, 2005 12:00 am

The Class of 2006

0

Jay Jaffe

Jay Jaffe uses JAWS to look at the newly eligible hitters on this year's Hall of Fame ballot.

Clay Davenport's Wins Above Replacement Player (WARP) figures make an ideal tool for this endeavor because they normalize all performance records in major-league history to the same scoring environment, adjusting for park effects, quality of competition and length of schedule. All pitchers, hitters and fielders are thus rated above or below one consistent replacement level, making cross-era comparisons a breeze. Though non-statistical considerations--awards, championships, postseason performance--shouldn't be left by the wayside in weighing a player's Hall of Fame case, they're not the focus here.

Election to the Hall of Fame requires a player to perform both at a very high level and for a long time, so it's inappropriate to rely simply on career WARP (which for this exercise refers exclusively to the adjusted-for-all-time version, WARP3). In past years I identified each player's peak value by his best five consecutive seasons, with allowances made for seasons lost to war or injury. That choice was an admittedly arbitrary one, and for the 2006 ballot I've revised the methodology to instead use each player's best seven seasons without concern as to whether they're consecutive or not. It's a subtle change that doesn't have a huge impact, but it does require less manual labor to determine the injury and war exceptions, a welcome development from where I sit. Effectively, we're double-counting more of a player's best seasons, but given what we know about pennants added and the premium value of star talent, individual greatness can have a nonlinear effect on a team's results both in the standings and on the bottom line.

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Another weeek, another round of steroid rumors. Also, former commissioner Fay Vincent checks in with his views on the game, Ron Gardenhire knows a thing or two about Pythagorean records, and an unlikely suspect resorts to bunting.

"No way. If I tested something positive for anything, then someone threw something in the (sample). I think it's because of the way I'm built. I've had people thinking that since I was in high school."
--Boston centerfielder Johnny Damon, responding to the rumor that he has tested positive for steroids (Boston Herald)

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October 28, 2004 12:00 am

Internet Baseball Awards

0

Greg Spira

We've got the results in online voting for honors in the Senior Circuit, including an unsurprising Player of the Year winner.

For the American League wrapup, click here. For complete results, click here.

It's time to announce the winners of the 13th annual Internet Baseball Awards. More than 1,500 cyberspace baseball fans participated in this effort to honor those players and managers whose performance in 2004 were most deserving of honors.

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January 5, 2004 12:00 am

2004 Internet Hall of Fame

0

Neal Traven

In this, our 13th year, the STATLG-L Internet Hall of Fame balloting demonstrates anew the uncertainties involved in trying to decide whether Player X or Player Y has the credentials to merit your vote for induction into the Hall. There were a number of intriguing questions to be answered this time around, dealing with both first-year eligibles and holdovers from last year. We recorded a total of 2363 ballots in this year's edition of the STATLG-L IHOF, appreciably less than last year's record total and even a bit lower than the number of ballots cast two years ago. I don't think we can blame this drop on the absence of a Veterans Committee ballot this year, and I won't speculate about other possible reasons for the decline. I must report, however, that I personally did less shilling for the event than I've done in previous seasons, so maybe some of the decrease can be laid at my own feet. The average number of names on a ballot was 5.83, very similar to last year's 5.96 and well above the 5.18 names per ballot a year earlier. Given the total number of ballots recorded this time, the 75% threshold was set at 1773 votes while the 5% gateway for retention on the ballot (if we, rather than the BBWAA, made that decision) came to 119 votes.

We recorded a total of 2363 ballots in this year's edition of the STATLG-L IHOF, appreciably less than last year's record total and even a bit lower than the number of ballots cast two years ago. I don't think we can blame this drop on the absence of a Veterans Committee ballot this year, and I won't speculate about other possible reasons for the decline. I must report, however, that I personally did less shilling for the event than I've done in previous seasons, so maybe some of the decrease can be laid at my own feet. The average number of names on a ballot was 5.83, very similar to last year's 5.96 and well above the 5.18 names per ballot a year earlier. Given the total number of ballots recorded this time, the 75% threshold was set at 1773 votes while the 5% gateway for retention on the ballot (if we, rather than the BBWAA, made that decision) came to 119 votes.

The most important question, as always, was whether any of the first-time candidates could garner enough votes for induction. The answer to that is a resounding yes. Heartiest congratulations to both leading vote-getter Dennis Eckersley (1940 votes, 82.1%) and Paul Molitor (1888 votes, 79.9%), who easily topped the required vote total and demonstrated that at least one kind of relief pitcher and one designated hitter belong in the STATLG-L Hall of Fame. No other first-timer got anywhere close to the goal. In fact, the only other newbie who finished ahead of any of the holdover candidates was @#$% Joe Carter (sorry, the Phillies fan in me surfaced for just a moment), whose 118 votes rounded to 5% even though it's actually a mere 4.994%.

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