CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Increased Strikeouts 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

03-16

comment icon

26

Extra Innings Excerpt
by
Christina Kahrl

07-07

comment icon

14

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports
by
Michael Street

06-23

comment icon

17

Spitballing: Checks and Balances
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

04-27

comment icon

4

Fantasy Beat: Running In Opposite Directions
by
Michael Jong

01-17

comment icon

0

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching
by
Matt Swartz

09-24

comment icon

12

Ahead in the Count: Predicting Strikeouts with Whiff and Swing Rates
by
Matt Swartz

07-07

comment icon

9

Checking the Numbers: Weaver's Soaring Strikeout Rate
by
Eric Seidman

09-17

comment icon

7

Changing Speeds: A Situational Pitching Hotfix
by
Ken Funck

09-10

comment icon

12

Changing Speeds: Situational Pitching
by
Ken Funck

11-21

comment icon

8

Player Profile: Aubrey Huff
by
Marc Normandin and Eric Seidman

10-13

comment icon

7

Player Profile: Jon Lester
by
Marc Normandin and Eric Seidman

10-01

comment icon

0

Player Profile: Francisco Rodriguez
by
Marc Normandin, Eric Seidman and Will Carroll

10-01

comment icon

4

Player Profile: Ryan Dempster
by
Marc Normandin, Eric Seidman and Will Carroll

06-12

comment icon

0

Fantasy Beat: More on QuikERA
by
Marc Normandin

06-07

comment icon

0

Nippon Prospectus
by
Mike Plugh

03-08

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Systems Retrospective, National League
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

comment icon

0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

comment icon

0

Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

08-30

comment icon

0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

05-23

comment icon

0

Future Shock: AL Central Roundup
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-11

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Strike Zones, Trilobites, and a Vicious Cycle
by
Dan Fox

09-05

comment icon

0

Swinging for the Fences
by
Will Carroll and Mike Carminati

03-22

comment icon

0

Prospectus Triple Play: Houston Astros, Milwaukee Brewers, Oakland Athletics
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-23

comment icon

0

Lies, Damned Lies: Estimating Pitch Counts
by
Nate Silver

07-16

comment icon

0

Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

06-20

comment icon

0

Doctoring The Numbers: The Windy City
by
Rany Jazayerli

10-12

comment icon

0

Call It In The Air!
by
Dave Pease

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

An examination of how baseball's increasing strikeout rate has impacted the game, torn from the pages of BP's next book.

Extra Innings: More Baseball Between the Numbers, edited by Steven Goldman, is the sequel to Baseball Prospectus’s 2006 landmark Baseball Between the Numbers, a book that gave many their first taste of state of the art sabermetric thinking in the years after Bill James and Moneyball. BP now returns with a sequel that delves into new areas of the game, such as how to evaluate managers and general managers, the true effects of performance-enhancing drugs, how prospects are recruited and developed in Latin America, and more. The book is now available for pre-order from Amazon and Barnes & Noble and should ship ahead of its official release date of April 3, 2012. Today, we present the first of two excerpts from the book.

***

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 7, 2011 9:00 am

The Asian Equation: The Decline of NPB Pitching Imports

14

Michael Street

In his fourth column in the Asian Equation series, Michael looks at the starting pitchers who have crossed the Pacific, in which many failures are punctuated with a few very notable successes.

In the flood of players coming from Japan, the majority (34 of 43) have been pitchers. Unlike the pursuit of the next Ichiro I described in my previous column, this has less to do with the success of Hideo Nomo than it does with the pitching market–pitching is a difficult commodity to find in any league. What has doomed many NPB starters in MLB, however, has been both talent and adjustment to a different pitching philosophy. To understand and explain the differences between the two, I’ve drawn not only on my own expertise, but relied on Japanese pitching expert Patrick Newman at NPB Tracker for additional insight.

Pitching differences reflect a deeper philosophical difference between Japanese and American baseball. As I discussed in my first Asian Equation column, Japanese culture appreciates baseball’s emphasis on discipline, sacrifice, and the dramatic showdown between pitcher and batter. Instead of putting a batter away quickly, NPB pitchers build tension by indiscriminately filling counts before a perfectly placed strike three resolves the battle. These aren’t seen as “wasted” pitches, instead reflecting the samurai-like virtues of endurance and dramatic battles.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

Enlisting a new type of analysis to reveal who's winning the eternal battle between batters and pitchers, and why.

Background: You’ve got to admit they’re getting better

“When the 100-meter freestyle is held today in high school girls’ regional swimming meets, it is generally won by a girl who swims the distance in just under 60 seconds. That time would have won the men’s Olympic competition in 1920, or any year before it.”—Baseball Between The Numbers

Read the full article...

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

April 27, 2011 9:34 am

Fantasy Beat: Running In Opposite Directions

4

Michael Jong

Michael Bourn and Brett Gardner are two speedsters running in different directions, but is that recent trend the future for either?

Fantasy players all know about the “steal specialist” player type, the guy who is selected primarily for a high steals count and pretty much nothing else. Two names among that hated group that are having interesting seasons (for different reasons) are Michael Bourn and Brett Gardner—they are clearly going in opposite directions to begin the 2011 campaign. Bourn is hitting .304/.375/.418 with 17 runs scored and a league-leading nine steals in nine attempts. Gardner is on the complete opposite end of the spectrum, hitting a paltry .136/.190/.254 with just three steals in six attempts to his name.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 17, 2011 10:00 am

Ahead in the Count: Situational Pitching

0

Matt Swartz

Are pitchers able to apply certain skills when a game calls for it?

One of the pitchers I enjoyed watching the most while I was growing up was Tom Glavine. Even though I was a Phillies fan and frequently saw him victimize my favorite team, I was impressed by the expertise he demonstrated on the mound, and how he perfected his craft. Glavine remains the premier example of a pitcher who out-pitched his peripheral statistics; he was greater than the sum of his parts. For the amount of strikeouts, walks, and ground balls that Glavine got in his career, he should never have been able to keep runs off the scoreboard as well as he did.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Pitch data shows that the amount of swinging strikes is not predictive of strikeout rates.

When I wrote about pitchers with major divides between their ERAs and SIERAs two weeks ago, a reader inquired why Clay Buchholz had such a pedestrian strikeout rate while having an above average swinging-strike rate. Buchholz has mustered just 6.2 K/9, nearly a full strikeout below the 7.1 league average, but has induced batters to swing and miss on 9.5 percent of his pitches according to FanGraphs, a full percentage point above the 8.5 percent league average. The question was apparent: Do pitchers who get a lot of whiffs increase their strikeout rates over time?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 7, 2010 8:00 am

Checking the Numbers: Weaver's Soaring Strikeout Rate

9

Eric Seidman

It appears Jered Weaver's mastery of a relatively new pitch has allowed him to punch out hitters like never before.

When Jered Weaver made his major-league debut on May 27, 2006, the Angels were 20-28, in last place in the American League West, and five games behind the division-leading Rangers. After the mega-prospect blanked the Orioles over seven strong innings to the tune of a 75 game score, Angels fans were more than enthused that their rotation had been vastly improved by his addition. Weaver would finish the season with a 2.56 ERA in 123 innings with an impressive 3.18 K/BB ratio and 1.03 WHIP. He walked few, proved stingy with allowing hits, and recorded his fair share of strikeouts. Though his rookie numbers were impressive, many would agree that Weaver’s lack of progress since then has been disheartening.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 17, 2009 3:11 pm

Changing Speeds: A Situational Pitching Hotfix

7

Ken Funck

Building on last week's work and reader feedback, an expansion on the subject of pitcher performance in double-play situations.

In last week's column, I took an initial look at the question of whether pitchers in general-or specific pitchers-are able to successfully tailor their approach to be more effective in certain game situations, or to be exact, during double-play (DP) situations and situations with a runner on third and fewer than two outs (R3). To do this, I performed some cursory analysis of pitching data for the 2005-09 seasons to see whether ground-ball, walk, and strikeout rates differ in these situations compared to the norm. The numbers I ran for the DP situation showed an increase in ground balls (which are often, but not always, good for the pitcher in double-play situations), a decrease in strikeouts (which are always good for the pitcher in any situation) and a decrease in walk rate. Lastly, I looked at individual pitchers to get some idea of which ones improved the most during the DP situation, based on a quick and dirty measure I called PRIDE, which summed the changes in ground-ball and K rates and subtracted the change in walk rate.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

September 10, 2009 12:44 pm

Changing Speeds: Situational Pitching

12

Ken Funck

Determining who's successful at pitching with a purpose when it comes to enlisting the pitcher's best friend.

Baseball can often be boiled down to a simple struggle between the wills and skills of one batter and one pitcher. At its base, reptilian core, this conflict is straightforward and Darwinian: pitchers want to record outs, while batters want to avoid making outs. But depending on the game situation, not all outs (or all non-outs) are the same. With the bases empty, any out will do-but with a runner on third and fewer than two outs, many fly balls and some ground balls can result in a run, while strikeouts and popups almost never do let anyone cross home. On the other hand, with a runner on first and fewer than two outs, a ground ball that results in a double play is usually better for the pitcher than a strikeout or popup.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 21, 2008 12:48 pm

Player Profile: Aubrey Huff

8

Marc Normandin and Eric Seidman

The former Devil Ray slugger returned to relevance with a bounceback campaign that deserved a lot more attention.

Saying that Aubrey Huff's performance this season was surprising is a significant understatement; he outperformed all of his recent campaigns by a country mile, and wound up looking like the Huff who was once considered to be the greatest Devil Ray ever in their (short) history. Since he has performed at this level in the past, the question we will look at today is whether or not he will be able to replicate this production in the future.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 13, 2008 2:10 pm

Player Profile: Jon Lester

7

Marc Normandin and Eric Seidman

The lefty's story only keeps improving with every turn, but will last season's hero build on this year's ALDS dominance?

Jon Lester has made headlines each of the past few seasons, but this is the first year that he's garnered attention due to his performance as a major league starting pitcher. Prior to the end of the regular season, Red Sox announcer Jerry Remy stated that Jon Lester was the best pitcher in the Red Sox rotation, and based on his performance both this season and in the playoffs, it's a tough position to argue against. How did he get to this point, and will he able to keep it up in the future?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 1, 2008 5:47 pm

Player Profile: Francisco Rodriguez

0

Marc Normandin, Eric Seidman and Will Carroll

With the saves record set, will he repeat his 2002 heroics in the postseason? And will his arm eventually fall off, or won't it?

Francisco Rodriguez has easily been one of the top closers in baseball since he was handed the full-time job back in 2005, and before that he was one of the game's top relievers, period. This is why it's no surprise that he's at the center of the discussions as to why the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim were able to win 100 games this year-but was 2008, the year he set the record for most saves in a season, the best year of his career, or should we be worried that this isn't the same K-Rod we watched grow up in front of us on national television?

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries