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Articles Tagged Humidor 

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August 24, 2012 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Rockies and Real Home Run Hitters

5

Sam Miller

Giancarlo Stanton's recent rampage against the Rockies inspires two questions: Have the Rockies ever had a "real" power hitter? And if not, why the heck haven't they?

We'll start as soon as Giancarlo Stanton's home run in Coors Field from last Friday night lands.

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Our latest guest contributor returns from the lab with exciting findings about home runs.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Alan Nathan is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His principal area of research is the physics of baseball. He maintains a web site devoted to this topic at go.illinois.edu/physicsofbaseball. His younger colleagues at Complete Game Consulting have bestowed upon him the exalted title of Chief Scientist.

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October 30, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Toolbox: Mailbag at Altitude

0

Derek Jacques

The puzzle of park effects led to a flurry of reader emails.

I received a decent number of questions about my park effects piece from last week, so I think it's worthwhile to spend one more column rooting through the mailbag and discussing a few loose ends. The extremely short World Series-indeed, the extremely short postseason, with seven series played in just four games over the minimum-has taken some of the urgency out of the long-delayed umpire discussion.

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Jeff Cirillo's comments about the baseballs used at Coors Field were right on the money.

The Associated Press reported a story yesterday that pushed me to do research I'd been wanting to do for a while. Tuesday afternoon, Brewers utility infielder Jeff Cirillo pointed out what should have been obvious for some time: that the Rockies' use of a humidor for storing game balls has gone past the point of a minor correction for atmospheric conditions and become a means to creating a pitchers' park. Cirillo cited little more than the way a ball felt in his hand and second-hand comments by his teammates, but he did add this:

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June 22, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: More Humidity

0

Dan Fox

As Dan explains, it's not the heat that gets you...

Two weeks ago I offered a few theories on why run scoring at Coors Field is down this year in response to a rash of articles on the "humidor effect" last month. Through games of June 15, some back of the envelope calculations show that run scoring is about 5% higher at Coors while home runs are up about 16%, whereas historically those numbers would be around the 25% and 50% range respectively. Obviously small sample-size caveats apply, but in that article we found that through the first two months of the season, run scoring and home runs have never been this low in Coors, a fact that verified Hurdle's statements and justified all the talk around the league.

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