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Articles Tagged Home Run Distance 

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June 22, 2013 6:58 am

Daily Roundup: Around the League: June 22, 2013

0

Clint Chisam

News and notes from around the league for June 22, 2013.

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May 1, 2013 6:32 am

Daily Roundup: Around the League: May 1, 2013

0

Clint Chisam

News and notes from around the league for May 1, 2013.

Thanks to Jason Martinez and Clint Chisam of MLB Depth Charts, we'll now be bringing you daily news, notes, transactions, injury updates, and notable performances from the previous day's games...throughout the entire season! And if you like what you see here, don't forget to check out MLBDC's Insider subscription, which also includes starting pitcher rankings and matchups, top 25 batter vs. pitcher stat rankings, lineup tracker (includes lineups from past seven games), rotation report, stat tracker, and more! 

Probable Pitchers for May 1, 2013

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Which of these three home runs by Justin Upton was hit the farthest?

Pop quiz: Which of these three home runs hit by Justin Upton over the last three years had the longest true distance?

A) July 27, 2011, at Petco Park vs. Cory Luebke

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A very bizarre thing happened in St. Louis on Saturday.

In St. Louis Saturday, Washington's Michael Morse hit a grand slam early in the game. It was an interesting experience. Watch it yourself:

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July 11, 2012 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: How Pitchers React to Home Runs

13

Sam Miller

What do pitchers look like just after allowing one of the longest home runs of the season?

If we learned anything from the Home Run Derby, it's that people enjoy watching home runs go far. We didn't actually learn that from the Home Run Derby. We knew that all along! It is a pretty well-established thing about baseball. I suppose we could just as easily say if we learned anything from the Home Run Derby, it's that large physical bodies such as the earth create an attractive pull whereby things that are flung up in the air will be drawn back down, the distance of flight correlating to the force exerted on the object. If you knew nothing before the Home Run Derby, you learned about gravity, and you learned that people enjoy watching big home runs. This is an introductory paragraph, and it is complete.

There is one small subset of the population we might not expect would enjoy watching big home runs: the pitchers who allow those home runs. We might not expect them to enjoy watching big home runs, but maybe they do. Maybe they have perspective on the thing. Maybe they appreciate the aesthetics of a baseball soaring impossibly deep into the sky. Maybe they're fans, just like you. Maybe not. I honestly don't know. 

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To what extent can changes in scoring be traced to temperature?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Alan Nathan is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. After a long career doing collisions of subatomic particles, he now spends his time studying the collision of ash with cowhide. He maintains an oft-visited website devoted to all things related to the physics of baseball: go.illinois.edu/physicsofbaseball.
 


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August 15, 2011 11:54 pm

Fantasy Beat: Victor's Missing Power

2

Jason Collette

A look at Victor Martinez's strong 2011 season... aside from a perplexing lack of power.

Victor Martinez went 2-for-4 yesterday, which makes him 27 for his last 72—good for a robust .375 batting average during that time from the fantasy wasteland known as the catching position. Thankfully, Jim Leyland has made sure Martinez has caught at least 20 games this season, giving fantasy owners another season of Martinez behind the plate, but all is not well in Motown. 

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We're retiring SIERA. Here's why.

Recently, there has been a lot of digital ink spilled about ERA estimators—statistics that take a variety of inputs and come up with a pitcher’s expected ERA given those inputs. Swing a cat around a room, and you’ll find yourself with a dozen of the things, as well as a very agitated cat. Among those is SIERA, which has lately migrated from here to Fangraphs.com in a new form, one more complex but not necessarily more accurate. We have offered SIERA for roughly 18 months, but have had a difficult time convincing anyone, be they our readers, other practitioners of sabermetrics, or our own authors, that SIERA was a significant improvement on other ERA estimators.

The logical question was whether or not we were failing to do the job of explaining why SIERA was more useful than other stats, or if we were simply being stubborn in continuing to offer it instead of simpler, more widely adopted stats. The answer depends on knowing what the purpose of an ERA estimator is. When evaluating a pitcher’s performance, there are three questions we can ask that can be addressed by statistics: How well he has pitched, how he accomplished what he’s done, and how he will do in the future. The first can be answered by Fair RA (FRA), the third by rest-of-season PECOTA. The second can be addressed by an ERA estimator like SIERA, but not necessarily SIERA itself, which boasts greater complexity than more established ERA estimators such as FIP but can only claim incremental gains in accuracy.

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Our latest guest contributor returns from the lab with exciting findings about home runs.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Alan Nathan is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His principal area of research is the physics of baseball. He maintains a web site devoted to this topic at go.illinois.edu/physicsofbaseball. His younger colleagues at Complete Game Consulting have bestowed upon him the exalted title of Chief Scientist.

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November 13, 2009 12:30 pm

Prospectus Hit and Run: Digging the Long Ball

8

Jay Jaffe

Homer rates increased around the league in 2009, but was this because of new ballparks, or other factors?

One of the six or seven factoids about the World Series which somehow escaped my notice when writing this site's epic preview was that the matchup between the Yankees and Phillies marked the first time since 1926 (Yankees vs. Cardinals) that the two teams who led their respective leagues in home runs faced off in the Fall Classic. The Phillies hit 224 homers and featured a quartet of hitters-Ryan Howard, Chase Utley, Jayson Werth, and Raul Ibaez-who each hit at least 30, the 12th such combo in history. The Yankees swatted 244 homers and had seven players with at least 20 homers, the fourth team with such a widespread distribution of dingers.

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September 22, 2009 12:22 pm

Checking the Numbers: Perceived Velocity

35

Eric Seidman

Sometimes it's not just a matter of how fast you throw, but from how close to the plate you're throwing it.

Few pitchers utilize their fastballs more frequently than J.A. Happ of the Phillies does, as he throws his four-seamed heater 71 percent of the time. Unlike Max Scherzer, who throws his fastball at a similar rate but routinely registers 95+ miles per hour on the gun, Happ averages a relatively modest 89.7 mph with rather pedestrian movement. Despite these facts pointing towards the idea that Happ's chief pitch is thus somewhat average or below, his plate discipline data has trended in the opposite direction: Happ ranks amongst the leaders in zone percentage yet has very low rates of both swings induced and contact made on pitches in the zone, performance characteristics that portend an ability to deceive hitters when coupled with his velocity and movement marks. Unless we accept that Happ's numbers are fluky, something about his delivery is preventing hitters from picking the ball up and reacting in appropriate fashion, whether that's a question of his hiding the ball well, or having a release that's closer to home plate than hitters are accustomed to seeing.

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September 7, 2009 12:43 pm

Ahead in the Count: Home-Field Advantage, Part Five

3

Matt Swartz

Wrapping up the review of home-field advantages to see if there's anything extra we might be missing.

This is the fifth and final article in this series on home-field advantage. The first four parts of this series have revealed many things. In the first article of this series, we studied what home teams are able to do more frequently than road teams; we learned that they pretty much do everything better, hitting more home runs, reaching base more frequently on balls in play, walking more often, striking out less often, stealing more bases, making fewer errors, and recording more complete-game shutouts. In the second article, we learned that nearly all home teams enjoy relatively similar home-field advantages over time, with the exception of the Rockies, and that the vast majority of year-to-year fluctuations in teams' home-field advantages are random fluctuation. The third time around demonstrated the important role of distance and familiarity in determining home-field advantage, and noted that home-field advantage was much larger in interdivision games than intradivision games, and was especially large in interleague games. We discovered something quirky in the fourth article of this series, that not only was the first game of the series not any more likely to exhibit home-field advantage, but the penultimate game was. More peculiarly, it was statistically significant, indicating that it is not all that likely to be merely noise. I received many e-mails and comments suggesting reasons that this peculiar effect may be real, or expressing skepticism that it is more than merely noise. This indicates that there is probably more to be learned about home-field advantage, and more that is not immediately obvious.

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