CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Hit By Pitch 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

06-13

comment icon

10

Skewed Left: Bayes and the Hit By Pitch
by
Zachary Levine

03-15

comment icon

1

Pebble Hunting: Retaliation, and Pitchers Hitting Pitchers
by
Sam Miller

05-07

comment icon

39

Overthinking It: Bryce Harper Takes the High Road
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-10

comment icon

29

Overthinking It: Seven Things You Didn't See Last Season
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-02

comment icon

11

The BP First Take: Monday, April 2
by
Daniel Rathman

01-09

comment icon

9

Pebble Hunting: The Battered Batter
by
Sam Miller

12-21

comment icon

36

Spinning Yarn: Hit-and-Run Success is No Accident
by
Mike Fast

11-22

comment icon

30

Spinning Yarn: How Does Quality of Contact Relate to BABIP?
by
Mike Fast

11-18

comment icon

15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Why Having a Quick Hook Helps
by
Mitchel Lichtman

10-28

comment icon

54

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling
by
Jay Jaffe

10-25

comment icon

35

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion
by
Jay Jaffe

10-19

comment icon

23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-17

comment icon

11

Spinning Yarn: Why are Batters Hit by Pitches?
by
Mike Fast

08-04

comment icon

6

Spinning Yarn: Counsell for the Defense
by
Mike Fast

08-04

comment icon

8

The BP Wayback Machine: Beautiful Theories and Ugly Facts
by
Dan Fox

07-20

comment icon

14

Spinning Yarn: A Zone of Their Own
by
Mike Fast

02-16

comment icon

59

Spinning Yarn: The Real Strike Zone
by
Mike Fast

08-29

comment icon

2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-07

comment icon

7

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Baldwin
by
David Laurila

03-07

comment icon

3

Prospectus Q&A: Chaz Scoggins
by
David Laurila

10-05

comment icon

9

Checking the Numbers: Location and Perception
by
Eric Seidman

05-17

comment icon

12

Prospectus Q&A: Jim Palmer
by
David Laurila

10-23

comment icon

0

World Series Prospectus: The I [Heart] New York Matchup
by
Jay Jaffe

10-16

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

comment icon

0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

comment icon

0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

comment icon

0

Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

comment icon

0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

05-18

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Moral Hazards of the Hit Batsmen
by
Dan Fox

05-11

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Strike Zones, Trilobites, and a Vicious Cycle
by
Dan Fox

05-04

comment icon

0

Schrodinger's Bat: Beautiful Theories and Ugly Facts
by
Dan Fox

01-26

comment icon

0

A Study in (Near) Perfection
by
Blake Kirkman

10-16

comment icon

0

Prospectus Today: The Greatest Show on Earth
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

comment icon

0

Call It In The Air!
by
Dave Pease

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 13, 2013 5:00 am

Skewed Left: Bayes and the Hit By Pitch

10

Zachary Levine

Ian Kennedy, Zack Greinke, and the probabilistic approach to determining intention.

When home plate umpire Clint Fagan made the decision not to eject Zack Greinke for hitting Miguel Montero with a pitch, and a subsequent decision to eject Ian Kennedy for hitting Greinke with a pitch, he was answering a couple of probability questions that umpires and eventually Major League Baseball will have to face.

It’s not a question of whether the hit by pitch was intentional or not. You’re never able to answer that question. The probability that the act was intentional from the point of view of the umpire/disciplinarian is never 0, even on the most innocuous-looking play, and it’s pretty much never unless Cole Hamels is just begging for a suspension.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 15, 2013 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: Retaliation, and Pitchers Hitting Pitchers

1

Sam Miller

Do pitchers have reason to fear stepping into the box after hitting a batter?

An accepted piece of baseball wisdom that I understood growing up is that a pitcher is less likely to go headhunting if he has to step into the box himself. As J.C. Bradbury and Douglas J. Drinen wrote in the 2007 article “Crime and punishment in Major League Baseball: the case of the designated hitter and hit batters,”

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Bryce Harper has already impressed with his play, but on Sunday, he made a similarly strong statement about his much-maligned makeup.

We thought we knew Bryce Harper pretty well even before he arrived in the big leagues. We saw him on the cover of Sports Illustrated when he was 16. We watched him dominate against older amateur competition, get drafted first overall, and hold his own against professional players several years his senior. Presented with Harper’s on-field exploits and the testimony of talent evaluators, we never questioned his skills, except to wonder whether he was merely great or the most promising prospect ever.

Our only serious questions concerned his makeup, and Baseball Prospectus was the source of some of the most concerning quotes. Two years ago, Kevin Goldstein wrote, “It’s impossible to find any talent evaluator who isn’t blown away by Harper’s ability on the field, but it’s equally difficult to find one who doesn’t genuinely dislike the kid.” Kevin repeated a scout’s assessment that Harper had “top-of-the-scale arrogance, a disturbingly large sense of entitlement, and on-field behavior that includes taunting opponents.” He quoted one front-office official who said, “He’s just a bad, bad guy. He’s basically the anti-Joe Mauer.”

Read the full article...

Events that have happened already this season after not happening for all of 2011 help explain why we're still hooked on baseball.

There were 2429 major-league games played last season.* Most of the things that can happen in a baseball game happened in one of those. With a few exceptions, teams and players will do all of the same things in 2012 that they did in 2011—they’ll just do them in a difference sequence and more, or less, frequently than they did before. When and how often they do those nearly identical things will determine which teams win divisions and which players win awards. We’re suckers for those things, so another season of the same, reshuffled, is enough to suck us in. But we're not completely content with repetition. We also watch in hopes of seeing something we didn’t see the season before.

*There would have been 2430, but no one felt like seeing another Dodgers-Nationals game in September. That missed game may have deprived us of history: Matt Kemp finished the season one home run away from 40 home runs, and Dee Gordon finished the season one home run away from one home run. For the alternate-history buffs: the man who would have started that game against the Dodgers, had it been played, was Tom Milone. Milone had the fifth-lowest home run rate among Triple-A starters last season, so that extra game might not have made Matt Kemp baseball’s fifth 40-40 man. Then again, that home run rate might not have meant much, since there weren’t many Matt Kemps in the International League. More on Milone a little later.

Read the full article...

There is too little evidence in the Troy Tulowitzki-Ubaldo Jimenez spat to draw definitive conclusions.

A little over a week ago, Ubaldo Jimenez and Troy Tulowitzki exchanged words in a Denver Post column. Yesterday, they exchanged them during the bottom of the first inning at Salt River Fields.

There’s more to the story, of course.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 9, 2012 9:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Battered Batter

9

Sam Miller

A visual and statistical look at Carlos Quentin's track record of taking one for the team.

It’s 5:53 a.m. I have three hours, and one factoid for inspiration: Carlos Quentin has been hit in 4.0 percent of his plate appearances. Yuniesky Betancourt has walked in 3.3 percent of his. Let’s just see where this takes us.

***

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

The hit-and-run is much maligned as a small-ball tactic, but it's a surprisingly successful strategy.

In this game you never know enough.”—Dale Mitchell

Read the full article...

Mike continues his investigation of HITf/x data to glean more insights into whether pitchers can prevent hits on balls in play.

In the first part of this study, I used detailed batted ball speed information from HITf/x to examine the degree of skill that batters and pitchers had in quality of contact made or allowed. Here, I will look deeper into the question of why some batted balls fall for hits and others do not.

Read the full article...

You might not know it from watching the World Series, but it often makes sense for a manager to pinch hit for his starter before the late innings.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Mitchel Lichtman, or MGL, has been doing sabermetric research and writing for over 20 years. He is one of the authors of The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball, and co-hosts The Book blog, www.insidethebook.com. He consulted for the St. Louis Cardinals from 2004 to 2006, as well as other major-league teams. He holds a B.A. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of Nevada Boyd School of Law. Most of the time these days you can find him on the golf course.


Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 28, 2011 10:37 am

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling

54

Jay Jaffe

If you tuned out when the Rangers led 7-5 in the ninth, you missed quite a finish

It was the best worst World Series game—or perhaps the worst best World Series game—I've ever seen. Four and a half hours, 11 innings, 42 players, 19 runs, 23 men left on base, six home runs, five errors, two final-strike comebacks, a handful of bad relief performances, some managerial howlers including a cardinal (not Cardinal) sin… and it all ended with the much-maligned Joe Buck giving a fitting nod to history by emulating one of his father's most famous calls. As David Freese's game-winning blast landed in the grass beyond the center field wall of Busch Stadium, Buck exclaimed, "We'll see you tomorrow night!" Game Six of the 2011 World Series will be remembered as a classic—a Game Six that can sit alongside those of 1975, 1986, and 1991, among maybe a couple others—as the Cardinals staved off elimination to beat the Rangers 10-9, forcing a Game Seven.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 25, 2011 5:15 am

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion

35

Jay Jaffe

A series of questionable moves, bloopers, and blown calls to the bullpen were pertinent in the outcome of Game Five.

Given not only his history but the clinic in bullpen management that Tony La Russa put on in the NLCS, it’s difficult to believe that he could wind up botching a situation as badly as he did in the eighth inning of Monday's Game Five of the World Series. But thanks to a miscommunication between the Cardinals' dugout and their bullpen, a manager who has spent his career chasing the platoon advantage ad nauseam was left with lefty Marc Rzepczynski facing righty Mike Napoli with the bases loaded and one out. Meanwhile, the pitcher he wanted to face the Rangers' best hitter at the game’s pivotal moment wasn't even warmed up. Napoli, whose three-run homer had broken the game open the night before, pounded a double off the right-center field wall, breaking a 2-2 tie and helping the Rangers take a 3-2 lead in the Series.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries