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Articles Tagged Hisashi Iwakuma 

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July 12, 2013 7:06 am

Raising Aces: How the Mighty Have Fallen

5

Doug Thorburn

Can mechanics help explain why Shelby Miller and Hisashi Iwakuma haven't maintained their early-season performance?

A couple of pitchers enjoyed breakout performances during the first two months of the season, only to wake up from the dream once the calendar flipped to June. Our inner statistician can easily wave these trends aside as the inevitable magnetism of regression to the mean, but I’ve found that reality often follows a more intricate path, with much to be learned through the analysis of outlier performances and small sample size.

Let's examine a couple of players who have fallen off from their early-season dominance in search of explanations that go beyond luck. In these cases, the “before” and “after” stats are split based on the arbitrary calendar date of June 1st.

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Coco vs. 'Kuma.

Longest Plate Appearance of the Week, 6/20-6/26
June 21, Athletics at Mariners
Hisashi Iwakuma vs. Coco Crisp, 13 pitches (two short of 2013 record)



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June 7, 2013 5:00 am

Fantasy Starting Pitcher Planner: Week 11

12

Paul Sporer

Cole Hamels snapped a six-start losing streak, and he stays in the auto-start ranks as Paul looks ahead to next week.

Welcome to the Weekly Pitching Planner. Each week I will cover the pitchers are who slated to make two starts and help you decide who you should start and who you should sit. Sometimes guys will be in the “consider” where they might have one good start, but a second tough one and then your league settings might determine whether or not you should go forward with him. The pitchers will be split by league then by categories:

Auto-Starts – These are your surefire fantasy aces. You paid a handsome sum for them either with an early draft pick or high dollar auction bid so you’re starting them anywhere, anytime. Guys can emerge onto or fall off of this list as the season evolves. There won’t be many – if any – notes associated with these groupings each week. We are starting them automatically so why do I need to expound on how awesome they are and will be in the coming week?

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April 29, 2013 7:36 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Monday, April 29

3

Matt Sussman

Just another manic Hit List.

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What can Hisashi Iwakuma's early season work teach us about using the most effective stats available?

Hisashi Iwakuma had the odd occurrence in his 2012 season where he was actually better as a starter. Most pitchers are not only better in short bursts out of the bullpen, but markedly so. Iwakuma spent 30 1/3 in the bullpen pitching to a 4.75 ERA and 1.42 WHIP with an 18 percent strikeout rate and 12 percent walk rate. He took off once he become a starter, posting a 2.65 ERA and 1.23 WHIP in 95 innings with a 20 percent strikeout rate and seven percent walk rate.

His 2013 season is off to an even better start as he has managed a 1.69 ERA and 0.53 WHIP in 26 2/3 innings through his first four starts. The only impediment to his success so far has been a blister issue, though something tells me his 100 percent left on base rate and .119 BABIP are set to rise. I have noticed that his batted ball mix is different from 2012 as his flyball rate climbed dramatically from 27 percent to 42 percent, including a 13 percent infield flyball rate.

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November 5, 2012 5:00 am

Transaction Analysis: C-Notes By the Layers for Big Papi

1

R.J. Anderson

The Red Sox re-sign Ortiz, the Brewers snatch up a buzzed-about reliever, Iwakuma gets a raise and the Indians trade for Aviles.

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May 31, 2012 9:58 am

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, May 31

2

Matthew Kory

Josh Hamilton is nearly twice as likely to hit a home run as he is to draw an unintentional walk.

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Hisashi Iwakuma did something weird Wednesday night, but that's not the weirdest part of this.

On Wednesday, Hisashi Iwakuma got his first save in the majors. It doesn't really call for an analysis of his post-save celebration, because it was one of those bastard saves where the pitcher protects a (in this case) 12-run lead by pitching at least the final three innings. Iwakuma's win probability added: 0.02, as he allowed three runs. 

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January 6, 2012 4:55 am

Transaction Analysis: See You in Seattle

6

R.J. Anderson

The Mariners go fishing across the pond for a couple of new Japanese imports.

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September 20, 2011 10:41 pm

The Asian Equation: The Future of the NPB Import Market

13

Michael Street

Michael ends his look at Japanese imports with some conclusions and a look at the future of the transpacific player market.

In the Asian Equation series, I’ve traced the history of the current posting system that imports players from NPB (Nippon Professional Baseball, the Japanese major leagues) and how the success of Ichiro Suzuki has affected it, from the position players who arrived in his wake to the pricey disappointments among starting pitchers and the marginally successful relievers. In this final column, I’ll take a look back to draw conclusions from this history and see what we can expect from the NPB market in the future. As with my previous columns, Patrick Newman’s advice and ideas were very helpful, as is his website, NPB Tracker.

The simplest, broadest conclusion concerns the players themselves, where we must draw an important distinction between talent and skills. As Craig Brown wrote in the comments section of his article on Tsuyoshi Nishioka, “. . . comparing two middle infielders just because they come from Japan is like comparing two middle infielders just because they come from Delaware.” Just because they’re from Japan doesn’t mean we can draw specific conclusions about individual ballplayers, their talents, or their ability to succeed in Major League Baseball. This goes double for Ichiro, whose skills are idiosyncratic on either side of the Pacific. Throwing money at Japanese players expecting them to be slap hitters with weird batting stances and an uncanny ability to find defensive holes is as foolish as thinking every Venezuelan shortstop will field (and endure) like Omar Vizquel. We can’t expect specific players to have certain inherent talents just because they were born in Japan.

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November 12, 2010 12:07 am

Analyze This: Hisashi Iwakuma

9

Jesse Behr

Taking a look at the Athletics new Japanese import

After being the highest bidder at nearly $17 million, the Athletics now have 30 days to negotiate a contract with Japanese right-hander Hisashi Iwakuma. This will be Billy Beane’s first attempt at signing a Japanese player through the posting process. Oakland, the team notoriously known for its Moneyball managerial style, has never dished out this kind of money on an international player. Does he deserve the dough? Here’s what the righty did while pitching in Japan:

Hisashi Iwakuma Age 29 Year Team G GS IP H ER HR BB K DERA W L H/9 BB/9 K/9 STF RAR 2001 Osaka Kintet 9 8 43.3 48 31 4 12 20 6.44 2 3 10.0 2.5 4.2 20 3 2002 Osaka Kintet 23 1 136.0 139 80 13 50 96 5.29 6 9 9.2 3.3 6.4 28 19 2003 Osaka Kintet 27 0 193.0 205 91 23 50 118 4.24 11 10 9.6 2.3 5.5 19 37 2004 Osaka Kintet 21 0 162.0 151 62 16 31 103 3.44 11 7 8.4 1.7 5.7 25 40 2005 Rakuten 27 27 186.7 205 127 23 48 100 6.12 7 14 9.9 2.3 4.8 0 15 2006 Rakuten 6 6 39.7 43 23 6 15 12 5.22 2 2 9.8 3.4 2.7 -16 2 2007 Rakuten 16 16 93.7 94 62 10 29 70 5.96 4 6 9.0 2.8 6.7 14 11 2008 Rakuten 28 28 206.3 161 65 6 45 129 2.84 16 7 7.0 2.0 5.6 42 63 2009 Rakuten 24 24 168.3 187 73 20 47 96 3.90 11 8 10.0 2.5 5.1 4 32 2010 Rakuten 28 0 206.7 191 84 17 42 119 3.66 14 9 8.3 1.8 5.2 22 49 Totals 20 10 140.8 139 68 13 36 84 4.38 8 7 8.9 2.3 5.4 19 26

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A brief scouting report on Japanese pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma from PITCHf/x data from the 2009 World Baseball Classic

According to Patrick Newman of NPB Tracker and Larry Stone of the Seattle Times, the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles will make their pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma available to American major league teams through the posting process this month.

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